13 Winter Homesteading Activities for Modern Homesteaders


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Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.When we think of homesteading, visions of backyard chickens, bountiful veggie gardens and jars of home-canned foods lining pantry shelves are usually the first things that come to mind. 

We think of pulling weeds and planting seeds; Of long, hot days gardening and farming livestock; Of evenings spent steaming up the kitchen windows while the canner runs steadily. 

We think of collecting fresh eggs on a dewy summer morning and snapping green beans on the front porch on a warm summer night. And of course we think of eating fresh food, made from scratch with ingredients grown and plucked from our own land.

Indeed, these are all noble homesteading activities in the fair-weather months, but what about when winter sets in?

What happens once the first hard frost comes to claim any life that remains out in the garden? What do we do when the snow starts falling and the hens stop laying? How do we fill our days and nights after the canner gets put away?

 

Homesteading is a Year-Round Lifestyle

For whatever reason, homesteading is most often thought of as a three-season “activity.” Planting season begins in the spring, gardening and farming season runs from spring through the summer and canning and preserving season takes us from summer into fall. Winter often only gets mention when we talk about how best to use the other three seasons to prepare for it. So much of homesteading centres around preparing for winter. But what happens when winter finally arrives?

Sure, we could just hunker down and relax, enjoy the fruits of our labour and rest until spring returns and the really busy seasons begin again. But the very nature of most homesteaders is that we tend to enjoy keeping busy, working hard and creating as much as possible with our own two hands. In other words, we tend to go a bit stir crazy sitting around on the couch for too long.

Now, let me just make this clear before we continue: I am not at all suggesting that you shouldn’t take a well-deserved break in the winter. On the contrary, I think it’s VERY important to take time to rest whenever possible so that you can feel rejuvenated and be more productive when you really need to be. 

But if you’re looking for some (mostly relaxing) homesteading activities that you can do throughout the winter months to help keep you occupied, save you money, ward off cabin fever and keep the pioneering spirit alive all year long, I’ve got a few suggestions for you. 

Let’s begin with my personal favourite…

 

1. Cooking & Baking

Although it could be argued (with sound reason) that cooking and baking are year-round activities, there’s no time like winter to fire up the oven, the slow cooker or the wood stove and create amazing comfort foods to fill the belly and warm the soul on cold, snowy days and nights.

Winter is all about cozying up and filling the house with the warm, comforting smells and tastes of home-baked breads, biscuits and desserts. It’s about creating hearty soups and stews, slow-cooked roasts and meals that stick to your ribs. 

Related: Homemade Honey Brioche Bread Recipe

Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.

It’s also the perfect time to put some of that home-canned food you worked so hard on to good use. Use your home-canned green beans in a comforting green bean casserole. Enjoy some home-canned tomato sauce over a hearty pasta bowl. Make soups out of home-canned stocks and broths. Make your own homemade flaky pie crust and use the home-canned fruit pie filling you put up in the summer. And of course savour every pickle, preserved fruit and jar of jam, jelly, relish, chutney, salsa and sauce you worked so hard to preserve in the summer and fall. After all, there is no better way to enjoy the fruits of you labour than to literally enjoy the fruits of your labour!

 

2. Winter Gardening & Farming

While many plants won’t survive the winter, there are a handful of cold-hardy veggies that you can grow throughout the winter.

Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.

Greens like kale, collards, bok choy and Swiss chard grow well even in cold, snowy conditions. Although you will still need to protect them from getting crushed by the weight of the snow. You can do so by building your own DIY Hoop House. Or better yet, you can use a heated greenhouse to extend your growing season right through the winter and keep your root vegetables growing while extending the life of summer veggies and getting an early start on spring planting.

Related: 3 Ways to Protect Your Plants from the Cold

For an even simpler winter “gardening” project, try growing your own sprouts or microgreens indoors!

And of course if you have livestock they will need to be cared for all throughout the winter. Be sure to keep them safe, dry and warm with extra bedding and always make sure they have enough liquid water to drink as water can easily freeze during winter. We use heated water dishes like these in the winter for our chickens and rabbits. 

 

3. Knitting & Crocheting

If you like to keep your hands busy, there is no better way to accomplish this in the winter months than to start a knitting or crocheting project. 

If you’ve never knit or crocheted before, there are some great videos on Youtube to help you get started. That’s where I began, and although I’m still not great at either, it’s a skill I’m working on. It’s also something I find I only have time to do in the winter when I have more time to sit and devote to it. 

 

4. Sewing & Quilting

Winter is also the perfect time to for sewing and quilting projects. If you’ve been wanting to try a new sewing project, finish a quilt that’s been sitting in your closet for ages or even just mend some clothing, winter is a great time to break out the sewing machine (or a simple needle and thread) and get to work!

Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.

Likewise, if you’ve never sewn anything before but you’d like to learn, winter is the perfect time to focus on learning and acquiring these skills!

 

5. Candle-Making

I don’t know about you, but the long, dark winter days and nights would be a lot more depressing around our house without the light and beauty that emanates from the plethora of candles that we burn throughout the winter months. There’s just something about natural candlelight during the winter that makes this this time of year just that much cozier and more enjoyable.

But candles aren’t just beautiful luxuries; They’re also essential items to have on hand during the winter months in case the power goes out or if you’re living off-grid. But the cost of buying candles from the store can add up pretty quickly. Not to mention, store-bought candles are often made with ingredients that you might not want to be burning and breathing in. By making your own candles at home, you can control exactly what goes into them and do so at a fraction of the cost of buying store-bought.

Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.

Processed with VSCO with a5 preset

The best options for homemade candles are beeswax or soy. You can make them scented or unscented. Using essential oils is usually your best option as the fragrances are natural, but you can use fragrance oils as well. I have used both and enjoy each for different reasons, but the choice is yours.

–> Click here to learn how to make your own scented soy wax candles with essential oils.

 

6. Making Soap & DIY Body Products

Just like candles, you can whip up your own homemade soap and body products at home in your kitchen (mostly). Of course if you are making soap with lye you will want to go outside due to its caustic nature. But otherwise everything can safely and easily be made in your kitchen.

Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.

Choose from cold-process or melt & pour soaps, DIY body butters, healing salves, lotion bars, salt and sugar scrubs, bath salts, perfumes, hair products, milk and herbal baths, bath bombs, lip scrubs, chapstick… the list goes on and on. In fact, anything you can buy at the store you can pretty well make at home, including most makeup. 

The basic ingredients for some of these projects can cost a little bit of money up front, but will almost always save you money in the long run while using safer, healthier, more natural ingredients. You can even make some things with a few simple ingredients you probably already have in your home pantry, like white sugar and olive oil. Just mix these two ingredients together and add a few drops of essential oil to make a beautiful homemade sugar scrub!

 

7. Making Homemade Cleaning Products

Winter is a great time to restock your cleaning supplies by making your own safe and natural homemade products. Just like bath and body products, the list of DIY cleaning products you can make at home is seemingly endless!

Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.

Make your own laundry detergent at home using a few simple ingredients. Infuse white vinegar with the rinds from citrus fruits that are in-season in the winter and make your own multi-purpose surface cleaner. Or blend together some baking soda with some dried, grated lemon peel and lemon essential oil to make a homemade sink, tub and toilet cleaner

You can even make your own potpourris with dried herbs and flowers and chemical-free homemade room sprays with essential oils and alcohol. These double as Christmas gifts as well!

Related: DIY Christmas Scented Room Sprays with Essential Oils

 

8. Building & Crafting

Whether you’re a skilled carpenter or just enjoy breaking out the hot glue gun and getting creative, winter is a the best season to devote some time to all of those DIY projects you’ve been wanting to tackle but never seem to have time for. 

Having a basement workspace or a heated garage is handy when it comes to woodworking and other building projects in the winter, but a simple craft room or even a dining room table is enough to do most DIY-ing. Whether you’re making your own homemade Christmas ornaments or building a bookshelf, winter is the time to break out the craft supplies and get making!

For more simple winter woodworking projects, be sure to check out the Winter 2021/22 issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, which includes a step-by-step beginner woodworking tutorial for making your own versatile wooden crate at home, as well as tips from professional woodworker and homesteader Anne of All Trades who walks you through how to source green wood for carving.

 

9. Reading & Writing

I’ve always loved to write, which is why I chose to start this blog in the first place! If you love writing too, winter is a great time to focus on journalling, blogging or maybe even starting the manuscript for that book you’ve always wanted to write!

The peace and stillness of this time of year lends itself to being a great time for reflection and contemplation, which is best expressed in writing. The quiet of a winter’s evening is the perfect environment to let your thoughts flow onto paper (or a keyboard).

Likewise, the same qualities about winter make it a great time to get some reading done as well. I’ve never understood those people who lay by the pool all summer reading their books. Even before I began homesteading, I still never had time to read in the summer! There was always so much else to do. But in January, after the rush of holiday madness has passed and the long-haul of winter really begins, I love to curl up with a hot cup of tea and a good book or magazine.

If you’re looking for some great reading material that will keep you inspired this winter, subscribe to Modern Homesteading Magazine and gain instant access to our entire library of issues!

Over the past 2+ years we’ve covered everything from organic gardening and backyard chicken keeping to herbal medicine, home canning, fermentation and sourdough bread (and SO MUCH MORE!)

Get exclusive articles, interviews, recipes and resources in every issue, and get brand new issues delivered right to your inbox!

–> Subscribe to our very own digital magazine right here and gain access to all 26 issues (and counting) right away!

Homesteading is typically associated with fair-weather activities like farming, gardening and preserving the harvest. But after the last jars have been pulled from the canner and the first frost sets in, what's a homesteader to do? Read on for a list of 13 winter homesteading activities to keep you busy all year long.

Whether you use the time to write your autobiography, start your own blog, get lost in a story or learn something new from a non-fiction book, winter is the best time of year for busy homesteaders to slow down enough to really sink into some reading and writing. 

 

10. Playing an Instrument

This is one thing I don’t do but really wish I did. There’s something about playing an acoustic instrument for entertainment in the winter that harkens back to times of old.

Whether you play Christmas carols on the piano, strum folk tunes on your guitar or organize a sing-along with the whole family, making music with your own voice and hands, without the need for electricity, follows in the tradition of the pioneers.

I always think of “Little House in the Big Woods” when Laura Ingalls Wilder describes her favourite time of day: When Pa comes home and strikes up his fiddle. 

Playing an instrument is truly old school entertainment, and definitely something you should consider learning if you ever plan on living off-grid! 

 

11. Seed Shopping & Garden Planning

Winter is also a great time to do a little dreaming. Usually by January or February, we begin longing for the warmer, brighter days of spring to return. One way we can help get out of the dark, winter mindset and brighten things up a bit is to browse through seed catalogues and start planning our spring and summer garden. 

February is usually the time when we begin starting some of our seeds indoors as well. Let the summer dreaming begin!

Related: How to Read and Understand Seed Packets

 

12. Self-Improvement/Personal Development

Winter and the New Year in particular is THE time to reflect on what’s working and what needs improvement in our lives, and to set new goals for ourselves to improve some areas of our lives that need some attention.

Whether you want to quit a bad habit, start a good habit, improve your physical body, get your finances in order, organize your home or learn a new skill, the New Year is the best time of year to set new goals, make plans for the future and take the time to focus on yourself and your dreams.

If you’re looking for some inspiration or ideas to help you get started with your own goal-setting, check out this list of 25 self-sufficiency goals to set (and smash!) this year!

I love to start each new year by creating a vision board full of things that I want to do, be or achieve. I hang it somewhere where I will look at it every day (like in the bathroom) to help keep my goals and dreams fresh in my mind each day. It’s amazing watching the things on my vision board materialize! 

I truly believe in the power of visualization and the law of attraction, and have achieved many of the things I’ve put on my vision boards in the past. I encourage you to make your own vision board too! Visualization and goal setting combined with intentional action is a winning combination for achieving anything you set your mind to!!

 

13. Family Time

I almost didn’t add this one as family time should be a priority all year long. But winter allows us the time to reconnect with family and friends and the seasonal celebrations and traditions to do so. 

It’s the time of year when we open our homes to extended family, friends and neighbours or when we travel to see relatives we don’t visit with every day. It’s a time to make merry and celebrate the love we share with others. It’s the time to let others know we love them and to make plans to get together and enjoy their company. And of course it’s a great season to spend quality time with our immediate family playing board games, building snowmen, going skiing, reading books and enjoying hot chocolate in front of the fire.

As homesteaders, spending time with our families is often at the top of our list of priorities. But throughout much of the year, that time is often spent working together. While that is excellent bonding time, it’s also nice to take a load off and simply enjoy each other’s company and revel in some good fun together. Play a board game, go for a winter walk in the woods, or just enjoy each other’s company as you linger a little longer over meals together. Whatever you do, put your phones down and give each other your undivided attention. Be fully present and enjoy every moment together.

 

There are so many activities that are perfect for winter, and I could probably make a list a mile long full of everything you could keep yourself busy with in the “off-season.” But these are my personal favourites and are the perfect activities for homesteaders to focus on.

I know that homesteading appealed to me in large part because I love keeping busy, creating, learning new skills and improving all the time. And while I love to relax in the winter, I love to feel like I’m still being productive while enjoying life at a slower pace than the rest of the year.

Winter offers us the gifts of peace, quiet and time that we don’t always get to enjoy during the other three seasons. So let us not wish it away, but embrace it and use it to our full advantage. After all, spring is just around the corner;)

 

 

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HOMESTEADING
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6 Comments

  1. Marilyn

    I always look forward to the winter because I have so many interests that I love to spend time on! I spend my winters practicing instruments, sewing, baking , and catch up on reading and writing so I’m right there with ya!

    Reply
  2. Maria

    This is a good read with great Winter ideas!!! Thanks for sharing:)

    Reply
  3. Teresa

    What a lovely post! I’m really enjoying your homesteading content. (As I sit inside and my husband goes outside to let the chickens out and walk the dog 😉

    Homesteading grounds is in nature, draws us to quiet. Love it.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Teresa,

      I couldn’t agree with you more. I find this lifestyle very grounding, very humbling and very awe-inspiring all at the same time. And I totally hear you about sitting inside on a cold winter’s day while Hubby heads outside to feed animals/do chores. This is often the case around our house as well;)

      Reply
  4. Lynda Lu Gibb

    Love doing most of these, and it is really nice to have a neighbour to share some of the activities ..time to get together to crochet and inspire each other..

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Yes! I need your help with a scarf I’m making 🙂

      Reply

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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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When I first started homesteading, I had a burning desire to become more self-sufficient and live a more sustainable life.

Ever since I can remember, I’ve been a rebel at heart, and learning how to homestead and become more self-reliant was a way for me to “throw a proverbial middle finger to the system” and live life on my own terms.

As a teenager, I was the girl who drove around town with punk rock music blaring from my car, Misfits sticker on the back and studs around my wrists. I felt misunderstood and angsty and like I desperately didn’t fit in with the world I grew up in.

I always knew in my soul that I wanted something different; Something more.

Today I’m the mama with stretch marks on my belly and battle scars on my heart. I’m the woman who gardens and cans food and makes her own tinctures and believes in something greater than herself and fights every day to stay free in a world that feels increasingly engineered to keep us hopelessly dependent.

Today I feel whole and at peace, and connected to a higher power and a higher purpose. I feel like I’ve finally found the place where I belong.

This journey has been about so much more than homesteading for me, and I've learned, lost, gained and loved so much more than I ever could have imagined.

Because, as I've said before, homesteading doesn't happen in a vacuum. Life is always happening at the same time.

This is the full, raw and unfiltered story of my homesteading journey, and how I've gained so much more than a pantry full of food along the way.

Click the link in my bio @anna.sakawsky to read more or check it out here >> https://thehouseandhomestead.com/how-it-started-how-its-going
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The news we’ve all been waiting for…

IT’S A BOY!!!

After so many years and too many losses, our hearts are so full and it feels like we are inching closer to our family finally being complete.

I’ve always known in my heart and soul that we were meant to have a girl and a boy. I know, it sounds cliché and very “nuclear family,” but years ago I saw a psychic who told me I would have a girl who loved to be centre stage and had a personality larger than life, very much how our daughter has turned out!

She also said I would have a boy who would be much more introverted and in tune with nature and with his own intuition. That’s yet to be seen, but I’ve always had this unwavering vision of a son and a daughter that fit these descriptions, and my heart has been set on a son ever since we had Evelyn.

Of course, things went sideways for a few years. Shortly after Evelyn was born, I became pregnant again, but we made the heartbreaking decision to terminate that pregnancy at 24 weeks due to a severe medical diagnosis. We lost our son, Phoenix Rain on June 15, 2018. Our hearts were shattered and have never fully healed.

Over the next few years, I had 3 more early miscarriages. None of the doctors knew what was causing them as most didn’t seem to have any sort of genetic explanation. We were told it was “something environmental,” but weren’t given any clues as to what that could be.

After pushing to see several specialists last year (after our most recent loss), and being told once again that there was “nothing wrong with me,” I finally got another opinion and found out I had something called Chronic Endometritis: A low-grade infection in my uterus that I believe in my heart was caused by my c-section with our daughter; A c-section I didn’t want and probably didn’t need, but felt I needed because I was under pressure to make a decision before the surgeon went off duty.

I’ll never know for sure, but when I pushed for more testing and finally got a simple round of antibiotics, the endometritis cleared up. I got pregnant again almost immediately and so far we now have a healthy baby boy on the way.

(Continued in comments…)
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We’re living through interesting times. Many people have even used the term “unprecedented times,” and while that may be true in that there has perhaps never been another time in history when we’ve faced so many existential threats all at once (ie. a global pandemic, climate change, political divisions, AI advancing at an incredible rate, cyber attacks, nuclear threats, globalization, food shortages, supply chain issues, hyperinflation, social media and the age of information/misinformation, etc. etc. all converging at once). But despite all of this, we are not the first generation(s) of humans to face hardships and threats of great magnitude, and in fact we’ve had it better than any other previous generations for most of our lives, especially here in the west.

The fact is, there are lots of things we can do to ensure we’re not sitting ducks when these threats come knocking at our door. But it takes action on our part, not waiting around for someone else to fix things or take care of us.

In the Summer issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, I sat down with The Grow Network’s Marjory Wildcraft to talk all about the realities of our current climate, including worsening inflation and looming global food shortages, as well as what every day people like you and I can actually DO to improve our food security, become more self-sufficient, care for our families and communities and ensure our own survival and wellbeing even in difficult and uncertain times like these.

While I don’t believe in fear mongering, I do believe in acknowledging hard truths and not burying your head in the sand. That being said, things may very well get worse before they get better, and we would all do well to start learning the necessary skills, stocking up on essential resources and preparing now while there’s still time.

Check out the full interview in the summer issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine. Link in bio @anna.sakawsky to subscribe or go to www.modernhomesteadingmagazine.com to subscribe or login and read the current issue.

#foodshortages #selfsufficiency #selfreliance #foodsecurity #foodsecurityisfreedom #homesteading #growyourownfood #fightinflation #stayfree
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If you’re like most homesteaders, you probably have a pile of scrap materials laying somewhere on your property, all with the “intention” of being resourceful and using those scrap pieces for future projects. And let’s be honest: With inflation and the cost of lumber and, well, pretty much everything these days, being resourceful with our scraps isn’t just practical, it’s downright necessary in many cases!

But the reality is that it’s often much easier to accumulate scrap pieces than it is to actually put them to good use, and if we’re not careful and discerning with what we keep on hand, that scrap pile full of homesteader gold can quickly turn into a junk pile of clutter taking up space on our property.

In the Summer issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, our resident handyman (my dear husband @ryan.sakawsky ;) shares his best tips for how to put your scrap pile to good use and knock some projects off your list while the weather’s still good, including which materials are worth saving and which ones aren’t.

If you haven’t had a chance to check out the summer issue yet, you can subscribe via the link in my bio @anna.sakawsky (or login to the library if you’re a already a subscriber) or go to www.modernhomesteadingmagazine.com

Do you keep a scrap pile? If so, what sort of materials do you have laying around?

#scrappile #modernhomesteading #homesteading #diy #getscrappy #resourcefulness #inflation #beatinflation
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