Baba’s Traditional Ukrainian Perogies Recipe


These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfoodThis traditional Ukrainian perogies recipe has been passed down through generations in my family. It uses simple, frugal ingredients, and makes enough to feed a small village, just like back in the old country:)

You see, I’m Ukrainian-Canadian. And although I’m 4th generation Ukrainian Canadian and have never actually lived in the Ukraine (although I have traveled there), it’s still a big part of my identity and my family never lets me forget it.

Ukrainian Family Traditions

I grew up doing traditional Ukrainian folk dancing, beginning at age 3 and performing and competing until I was 19 years old. My mom danced too, longer than I did, and she even moved to the Ukraine to study dance for a year when she was 21: in the 1970s when Ukraine was still part of the Soviet Union. That was definitely something most people from here did not do, especially in that day and age, so she still wears it like a badge of honour, and rightfully so.

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

My mom (left) and my aunt (middle) in their Ukrainian dancing costumes. And there’s me on the right! Just a few years ago;)

My aunt danced too, and my cousins still dance competitively today. I’m Ukrainian on both sides of my family, see, but the music and dancing comes from my mother’s mother’s lineage. My mother’s mother even used to dance around the house, dusting and vacuuming to traditional Ukrainian music!

And it was my grandma’s mother -my great grandmother who I called Baba Sophie- who passed down the real cultural gem in my family: Her traditional Ukrainian perogies recipe that we still get together to make every year.

If you’ve never heard of perogies before, they are essentially dumplings filled with mashed potatoes that are then boiled or fried and topped with loads of fried onions and sour cream. At least, that’s the traditional way to eat them. There are, however, many varieties of perogies, including meat-filled ones, fruit-filled ones and sauerkraut-filled ones. But traditionally they are made with potatoes, and they’re a crowd pleaser, I tell you what!

A Traditional Family Recipe Passed Down Through Generations

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

I recently found this locket that I inherited from my grandma. Inside are photos of my Baba Sophie and my Gido (great-grandfather) whom I never met. I just so happened to be wearing this locket during our perogy-making session. I’m sure Baba Sophie was there in spirit and would be proud of how we’ve preserved her recipe and carried on the family tradition.

Baba Sophie was also in the orchestra that played the music for the dancers. She played the mandolin and a couple other Ukrainian stringed instruments called the domra and the balalaika. In other words, she had nimble hands and fingers, which made her an excellent perogy-maker.

She was a good writer too. I like to think I’ve inherited some of her talents. While I know full well I’ll never be able to pick up a stringed instrument and play like she did, I believe my love of writing and my knack for making some killer perogies runs in the same bloodline.

I was only four years old when she died, so I never got to make them with her. But my aunt used to go over to Baba’s place every Friday and make a batch with her.

She learned the recipe from her first hand and practiced it many times before I was old enough (and took an interest enough) to learn.

Nowadays we usually only get together to make them once a year. We usually do it in January, sometime around Ukrainian Christmas (January 7th) and Malanka (Ukrainian New Year, January 13th).

How to Make Perogies

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

My aunt (with the rolling pin at the end of the table) learned the family recipe first-hand from my baba. She is now the perogy matriarch in our family; A role I hope to inherit one day!

Perogies are stupidly easy to make from scratch, and they freeze really well too. You can easily make a large batch and fill your freezer rather than buying them pre-made and pre-frozen from the store.

Start by making your potato filling. My family recipe combines potatoes with sharp cheddar cheese and sautéed onions, although you could use just potatoes or substitute a different cheese… My other side of the family makes their perogies with potatoes and cottage cheese, so this recipe is flexible!

Start by peeling and quartering your potatoes. Place them in a large pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook until soft and easy to mash. Strain potatoes through a colander but reserve potato water for making the dough (this is optional, but the extra starch in the potato water makes for a really good perogy dough!)

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

 

Transfer potatoes back to the pot and mash them. Add in grated cheddar and sautéed onions and mash everything together until all of the ingredients are well-combined.

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

Place filling in a container and refrigerate. Chill for at least an hour or two or even overnight.

To make the dough, sift flour together with a little salt. Then mix reserved potato water (or fresh water), eggs and a little bit vegetable oil (use olive oil if you’re looking for a healthier option) and slowly pour it into your flour mixture, mixing it as you go, either by hand or with a stand mixer.

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

Mix it all together and knead it until everything sticks together but the dough is easy to work with (not too sticky on the outside). Then wrap dough in plastic wrap or in a Ziplock bag and let it rest for about half an hour.

Roll dough out over a lightly floured surface to about ⅛-inch. You want it thin but not so thin that it breaks, so use your own judgment. Then cut out rounds of dough with a biscuit-cutter or an upside-down glass. 

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

Fill each round with about a tablespoon of potato filling. I like to roll my filling in a ball first but you can skip this step and just scoop it in if you like. Then fold the perogy dough over the filling and pinch the edges together to seal it. Repeat a couple hundred times:)

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

 

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfoodTo cook them, bring a pot of water to a boil and place the perogies in boiling water for a few minutes until they float to the top (this signals that they are ready). You can cook them from fresh or frozen. It helps to add a little oil in your pot of boiling water to prevent the perogies from sticking together.

Remove perogies from water with a slotted spoon or strain them through a colander. Transfer them to a serving bowl and then drizzle with a little olive oil or a pat of butter and toss. Top with fried onions and serve with a generous helping of sour cream.

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

How to Freeze Homemade Perogies

I love that our family usually gets together to make a big batch of perogies in January because by January the freezer is starting to empty out as we continue to use up all of the fruits and veggies we preserved in the summertime. Plus, January is usually the month when I finally get around to processing all of the tomatoes I froze back in the summer and fall, which clears up a bunch more space. And trust me, if you made perogies like my family makes perogies, you’d need to clear some freezer space too. Because we don’t just make a few dozen perogies at a time, we make a few hundred.

This year we made about 300. My aunt and cousins came to visit us on Vancouver Island for Ukrainian Christmas (they still live on the mainland), and they set to work helping me fill my freezer with hundreds of freshly-made perogies while they were here. It truly was the best gift of all! 

To freeze them, we lined baking trays with parchment paper. Then we laid a single layer of perogies on the parchment paper and then another layer of parchment on top and repeated the process until we had about 3 or four layers of perogies per baking tray/casserole dish. Then I flash froze them until they were frozen solid and transferred them into freezer bags where they will stay until I’m ready to cook them!

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

 

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfoodWe danced, we sang, we stuffed perogies and my family filled my freezer with little Ukrainian potato dumplings while I took pictures of them. Thanks ladies! You’re the best:) 

Then we had a big family lunch together that consisted of a few dozen of our freshly-made perogies, some traditional Ukrainian Kielbasa (garlic sausage), some of my homemade sauerkraut and a side of homemade pickled beets, of course.

These traditional Ukrainian perogies are made from scratch with simple ingredients and cost just pennies a piece. This perogies recipe makes enough to feed a large family and put some away in the freezer for later. A great frugal food to fill your belly and make your dollars stretch! #perogies #perogiesrecipe #ukrainianperogies #frugalfood #freezercooking #ukrainianfood

Simple, Delicious Food Made From Humble Ingredients

If you’ve never had a Ukrainian meal, my friend, then you’ve never really lived.

Some other staples of Ukrainian cuisine include cabbage rolls and Borscht, a simple, frugal beet soup recipe that is as healthy as it is cheap to make! 

Because at the end of the day, traditional Ukrainian food is really just peasant food, and in my opinion and experience, peasant food is the best food in every culture…

It’s food that costs pennies to make and can feed a village. It’s food that utilizes simple, humble ingredients -things like homegrown cabbage, potatoes and beets- and turns them into something glorious and delicious. It’s comfort food that sticks to your ribs and keeps you going through a long winter. But most of all it’s food that brings people together, both in the making and eating of it. And after all, isn’t that what all good food should aspire to do?


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

18 Comments

  1. BJ

    Thank you for the walk down memory lane! I really miss pierogies and the other yummy goodies – wheat gives me wicked vertigo so I haven’t had these in years. (I saw your comment about finding some GF recipes online – I’ll have to do that.)

    I’m half Slovak and Granny used to make these when she came to visit. Hers were the best. Mom’s were really good but not quite as good as Granny’s (shhh – don’t tell Mom!). The potato/cottage cheese or sauerkraut ones were standard in our house.

    Pierogies, sauerkraut, and kielbassa are “soul food” to me! I strongly dislike beets but can eat Ukrainian borscht all day long.

    Thanks again for the memories!!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      I’m part Slovak too. My grandpa was Slovak. I am all about the Ukrainian “soul food” as that’s mine too! And while I don’t dislike beets, by far my favourite way to enjoy them is either pickled or in borscht:)

      Reply
  2. Connie MacKinnon

    Your dough recipe tasted just like my Mom’s who passed 20 years ago. Thank you! When I made perogies as a child with my Mom, we always boiled all the perogies after making them – even those that were to go into the freezer. I’m remembering my Mom saying that they dry out if you didn’t cook them and drizzle them with butter before freezing. But times change. Can the perogies be frozen without being boiled – then boiled from frozen as with commercially sold perogies? Many thanks!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Connie,

      I never cook them before I freeze them. Just flash freeze them by laying them (uncooked) on a tray lined with parchment paper until they’re frozen, then transfer them to a freezer bag! Cook from frozen whenever you’re ready. They tend to last well up to 3 months in the freezer, but in all honesty I’ve kept them up to 6 months and cooked them and they’ve been just fine:)

      Reply
  3. Tanya

    Thank you so much for this recipe:) The traditional simple dough recipe was exactly what I was looking for, and my pierogis turned out so amazing. Best batch I’ve ever made!! Just like Baba’s. My husband said they are hands down the most delicious pierogis he’s ever eaten.
    After mixing the potatoes and onions, I divided the filling into four bowls and did four varieties…cheddar, sauerkraut mushroom, cottage cheese green onion, and jalapeño cream cheese cheddar:) Great way to spend a day during this Covid lockdown! Thanks again!!

    Reply
    • Tirzah

      Hi Anna,
      Thank you so much for this recipe! My German/Russian Mennonite grandmother used to make these and we had her recipe recorded, but it was lost. I have been searching for a long time for a perogie recipe that looked right and this is the first recipe I’ve come across that really sounds like the way she used to make them. I’m so excited and can’t wait to try it out!

      Reply
    • Tracey

      How much of the different fillings did you use in each variation? I’d like to try all four!

      Reply
  4. Greg

    This recipe is damn near spot on to my Babas. I made these last night and talk about a home run. I would love to see any of youre other Ukranian recipes like borscht and cabbage rolls.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Glad to hear you enjoyed it! This is the exact recipe my Baba (my GREAT grandma) used to use. I’m not sure what her mother used before coming to Canada as they probably wouldn’t have had access to cheddar cheese back then! I’m thinking the filling was probably a mixture of potatoes and cottage cheese. I’m so glad you enjoyed and will definitely be adding more Ukrainian family recipes in the future!

      Reply
  5. Greg

    I loved this read, it brought me back to a simpler time filled with lots of warm memories. Thank you for sharing, My Baba passed 15 years ago and with her passing so did alot of things. I never had the privilege of learning how to cook traditional Ukrainian food so im winging it now. If they taste half as good as the pics posted i cant wait to grab a spoonful of sour cream!

    Reply
  6. Leah Bosch

    I have always wanted to make Perogies but have always been intimidate do it. My family loves them and cabbage rolls, so I have been searching the web for simple recipes for both, and your website with your family tradition is what caught my eye. I love that you do it all together as a family, so I am going to try your recipe and get my children to help me, and who knows, maybe we will start a tradition of our own? I hope so, anyway, I just wanted to say Thank You for sharing your wonderful tradition and recipe with us.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Leah,

      I’m so glad you found this recipe because it truly is really simple. Plus many hands make light work (and make any sort of kitchen prep more fun!) so if you can get your family on board, all the better:)

      Reply
  7. Krista Chambers

    Just curious how many perogies this makes? I’m having a perogy making day with my friends and want to plan so we all have enough to take home a few doz.

    Thanks so much! I’m going to definitely use this recipe for our day!
    Krista

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hey Krista!

      I actually had to call up my aunt and ask her. This is her recipe! So depending on how large you make the rounds and how full you fill them, etc. you should get about 150-200 perogies out of this batch. Sometimes I find I have extra dough leftover, sometimes extra potatoes. It’s sort of a rough science! But you’ll definitely get quite a few dozen:)

      Reply
  8. Lindy

    This is such a beautiful tradition that you have!
    We make pierogies every November, so your recipe and blog post caught my eye.

    Thank you for so carefully writing out your recipe and taking pictures.

    All the best to you and yours!

    Reply
  9. lorraine

    I have many fond memories of making these with my polish friend and family. They would make around 600 at a time. After the first time working with them doing one at a time I had a plan for the next cooking session. I bought her mom a metal ravioli maker. I told her we were making Italian style ones. She was sold when 12 at once could be done. A few years afterward I notice they do make pierogi shaped mold too, but we all got to like the square ones. Her daughter likes to pass the dough through a pasta maker gadget on her stand mixture a few times before hand rolling which helps as well to get that dough to spread out more and faster. My best friend passed away a couple years ago and I finally worked up courage last winter to do up some by myself. I missed having her in the kitchen with me but it was wonderful to enjoy some homemade pierogi again. Great recipe even for an Italian.

    Reply
  10. Stacy Blackwell

    Love your blog and newsletters since I am a homesteader at heart yet live in the suburbs. I always make everything from scratch due to food allergies. Do you know if these can be made with a gluten free flour blend? Nothing beats old fashioned flour and bread recipes but it makes my family sick. So sad. Anyway, I browse your site and think of ways to make your recipes work for us with our substitutions and just wondered if you had any experience with subing ingredients in your recipes. Again, love your posts. Looking forward to more. And thank you for sharing.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Stacy! That’s so nice of you to say. I honestly haven’t tried them with a gluten-free substitute, so I can’t speak from personal experience. However I just did a quick Google search and found a bunch of different recipes with gluten free dough options. You could certainly do a search and decide on a dough option that works best for you and use the same filling recipe from these perogies. I do need to branch out and try out some gluten-free options! We don’t seem to have any sensitivities to gluten in our family so we usually stick with the standard. However you can look forward to many naturally gluten-free recipes coming up as I embark on the Keto diet next month. I’ll be talking more about that in next week’s newsletter so be sure to keep an eye out! All the best. Anna

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
You Might Also Like
Homemade Elderberry Syrup Recipe

Homemade Elderberry Syrup Recipe

* This article may contain affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   Elderberry syrup has gained popularity in recent years as a natural but powerful herbal remedy, particularly for treating colds and flu. After all,...

read more

Homemade Pumpkin Spice Syrup

Homemade Pumpkin Spice Syrup

* This article may contain affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   Okay, I’m just gonna come out and say it: I’m a total sucker for pumpkin spice. Call me #basic, but it’s the truth. In fact, I’m all about everything fall:...

read more

The holidays are fast approaching, and that means it’s time for my FAVOURITE THINGS!!! 🎉🎁🎄(aka. The modern homesteader’s Christmas wish list;)

I’ve rounded up all of my fave kitchen tools, books and home and body products that I use all the time and could not live without (ok, I could live without them, but I wouldn’t want to!) and I’m sharing them all with you in this week’s YouTube video!

Grab a mug of something warm (or a glass of something chilled) and come on in for a tour of all the goods!

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to YouTube.com/thehouseandhomestead for all the latest videos:)
...

I’ve wanted to learn how to forage for wild mushrooms for years but have always either missed the season, been too busy or just couldn’t find anyone to take me out and show me the ropes. (Mushroom hunters are known for being a little tight-lipped about sharing their spots;)

Well, today I finally got out with a guide and found my very first Chanterelle all by myself!!

This sort of thing might seem like no big deal to most people, but for those of us with an insatiable appetite for learning new skills, it’s a milestone moment.

There’s still an endless list of skills I want to learn and projects I want to tackle. The thing I love most about the homesteading lifestyle is that there is literally always something new to learn!

I don’t expect to ever learn all the things I want to learn, but I know that even when I’m in the latter season of my life, I’ll still have an insatiable appetite to keep learning until it’s my time to leave this Earth.

At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter where you live or how much land or experience you have. If you consider yourself a lifelong learner (who’s not afraid to get your hands dirty), then you have what it takes to be a homesteader too;)

Super pumped for tonight’s dinner of wild mushroom risotto and a celebratory glass of Chardonnay :)

What skill(s) do you want to learn next?
.
.
.
#wildmushrooms #mushrooms #chanterelles #foraging #wildfood #wildfoodlove
...

It’s November, and that means we’re about to head into cold and flu season (hello, some of us are already there 🙋🏻‍♀️)

Add in a global pandemic, and we could be in for a rough ride these next few months 🦠

I spent some time the other day whipping up a few homemade herbal remedies that we’ll be relying on all winter long to help boost our immunity and keep our whole family as healthy as possible. I thought you might like to join me in my kitchen as I show you how easy it is to make your own herbal medicine at home, and talk more about how we stay healthy the all-natural way (and how you can too!

More specifically, I’ll be showing you how to make your own elderberry syrup, rose hip syrup and fire cider with simple ingredients and directions that anyone can recreate. (Seriously, no special skills are required to become your own live-in natural medicine pharmacist;)

Head on over and click the link in my profile or go to https://youtu.be/Rli1LqxHbg8 to check out the full video and start stocking your natural home medicine cabinet before it’s too late!

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead
...

I remember the distinct taste of the cherry-flavoured medicine I used to take when I got sick as a kid. I also remember the weird chemical aftertaste it left in my mouth (because the “natural” cherry flavour is really just added to cough syrups to mask the taste of the synthetic drugs they contain.)

Contrast that with the smooth, natural flavour of homemade elderberry syrup, made with organic elderberries, fresh ginger, lemon, cinnamon, cloves and raw honey, and the difference is like night and day! I would even put this stuff on my pancakes (and technically I could). That’s definitely a no-no for the cherry-flavoured pharmaceuticals.

But not only does homemade elderberry syrup taste better than the OTC (over-the-counter) stuff, it WORKS just as well to relieve cold and flu symptoms too! Actually, it might even work better!!

This is because, if used regularly, elderberry syrup can help you to stay healthy by building up your immunity and warding off illness in the first place, and if you do get sick, the antiviral, anti microbial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory properties in this elderberry syrup recipe will help you feel better and support faster healing rather than just relieving symptoms.

Oh, and by making your own elderberry syrup at home instead of buying it by the bottle at your local health food store, you’ll also save yourself a buttload of money. (And that also helps to relieve a little suffering;)

To learn how to make your own all-natural elderberry syrup at home, click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/homemade-elderberry-syrup-recipe/ to get the full recipe!

P.S. It’s stupidly easy to make too, so no special skills are required to make your own batch;)
...

Just a reminder, there are only a few hours left to get your free Wellness Sampler Set from @planttherapy essential oils, which includes my very favourite Germ Fighter blend plus two more must-have oils to keep on hand this cold and flu season.

All you have to do is purchase the Herbs & Essential Oils Super Bundle by midnight tonight and you’ll not only get almost 95% off the entire bundle, you’ll also get this set of three 10ml. essential oils (a $22.95 value) completely free! (Just pay shipping).

Head over and click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead to learn more and get your bundle and your FREE Wellness Sampler Set now!

(Seriously, do it. You’ll be glad you did;)
...

If there was ever a year to be more diligent about taking care of ourselves and our families during the winter months, this would probably be that year.

That's why my focus right now (and every year around this time) is on stocking my home medicine cabinet with germ-fighting essential oils and herbal remedies of all kinds. And it’s why I’ve been encouraging you to do the same!

But in order to use herbs and essential oils safely and effectively, you need to know HOW to use them safely and effectively.

As with anything, you can find a lot of free info online, but how much of that information can you really trust? Wouldn't it be even better to have your own little library of reliable natural remedies right at your fingertips - especially one that's been created and curated by trusted aromatherapists and herbalists?

Well look no further, because the Herbs & Essential Oils Super Bundle is back due to popular demand for the 5th year in a row!

Here's a quick breakdown of what's included in this year's bundle:

—> 17 eBooks with recipes for simple herbal remedies for cold and flu season, herbal teas for winter health, making your own spa products, DIY herbal gifts for men, essential oil DIYs for the home and much more.

—> 12 eCourses on how to make your own herbal preparations, use echinacea to ward off colds and flu during the winter months, create your own healthy, herbal sweets, increase your energy the all-natural way and more!

—> 6 printables and workbooks to help you plan your own herb garden, organize your essential oils, deepen your herbal knowledge and, you guessed it, more, more, more!

Best of all, you can get all 35 resources (valued at over $650) for just $37! But only for the next five days. After that this bundle goes back into the vault until next year.

If you wanna get your hands on this amazing library of resources, head on over to my profile and click the link in my bio to check it out.

Plus, if you order your bundle by tomorrow night, you’ll also get a free set of three essential oils from @planttherapy (the only brand of essential oils I use in our home).

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead to get yours or learn more!
...

Lest we forget.

Democracy is fragile. We must never become complacent or take it for granted.

Remembering all those who fought and continue to fight for our freedom today.
...

🌿 It’s no big news that we’re headed into what could be a particularly bad cold and flu season this year.

Between COVID cases going up along with our stress levels about everything that 2020 has brought with it, we would all be wise to practice a little more self care right now, which includes getting our stress levels under control, eating healthy, drinking lots of water, getting adequate sleep and boosting our immunity and overall health naturally.

To help with this, we turn to herbs and essential oils in addition to practicing a healthy, natural lifestyle. And you’ll often find me on here encouraging you to do the same.

Natural medicine, when used correctly, helps to support all of the organs and functions of our body so that we are less susceptible to sickness and disease should it get in our bodies. While it can be used for acute conditions, it’s best when used preventatively, so if you haven’t yet, now is the time to start whipping up some homemade herbal remedies to start using before we get too deep into the season, and to have on hand if and when illness strikes.

My affiliate partners @ultimate_bundles put together an eBook with 54 herbal (and oily) recipes that you can easily make at home to help boost immunity, treat illness, promote sleep and relaxation, improve complexion and keep dangerous synthetic chemicals out of your home and body.

It’s totally free to grab it right now but it’s only available for free until tonight at midnight.

👉 Grab your copy by clicking the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead.

And if you’re also looking for some new essential oils to add to your home apothecary, remember to use coupon code HOME15 on your next @planttherapy order to get 15% off your entire order (only until the end of November).

Take care of yourselves and stay well everybody! ❤️
.
.
.
#herbalmedicine #selfcare #naturalmedicine #herbs #aromatherapy #allnatural
...

Only a few hours left to get your hands on all the freebies on offer at the Handmade Holiday Gift Mall, including my full video tutorial on how to make your own scented soy wax candles (always a hit at Christmas time:)

Plus, for a limited time only, use code HOME15 at planttherapy.com to get 15% off your order of essential oils to use in your homemade candles!

Click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead to get your hands on all the goodies now!
...

My heart is so full right now. I’m sitting here crying happy tears as I watch history unfold. Such a breath of fresh air after the past four years.

I’m feeling hopeful for the future of our planet, our people and democracy all around the world for the first time in a long time.

Feeling so proud to call America my neighbour tonight. There’s still a very long road ahead to heal the deep divides and wounds of the past, but I’m confident we have what it takes to turn this ship around and ensure a long and prosperous future together. All of us.

Now let’s all get to work and get those borders open again soon!

Congratulations USA!!! 🇨🇦❤️🇺🇸
...

As we come closer to wrapping up the year that was 2020, I've started to reflect on the lessons I've learned. I distilled it down to 6 humbling life lessons that 2020 has taught me or reinforced in my life about gardening, homesteading and life, and I'm sharing them with you today in hopes that they might help you put this year in perspective too:

—> Lesson #1: We cannot control everything (and that's okay)
—> Lesson #2: Always diversify (crops, income streams, skills, etc.)
—> Lesson #3: Be grateful for the good (we cannot have the good without the bad)
—> Lesson #4: Hope for the best but prepare for the worst (stay positive but be realistic)
—> Lesson #5: Every failure is an opportunity to learn and grow (seek to find the lessons)
—> Lesson #6: There's always next year (one ending is just another beginning)

Join me for a heart-to-heart in the garden as I take one major disappointment (tossing a box of homegrown tomatoes in the compost) and make the best of it by using it as a catalyst to reflect on the year and the growing season and find the lessons and meaning behind it all.

Click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead to watch the full video or go to https://youtu.be/XnnbsAqrd5A and let me know what hardships or disappointments YOU'VE overcome and what lessons you've learned this year in the comments.

Remember, we’re all in this together 🖤
.
.
.
#2020 #lifelessons #nosuchthingasfailure
...

When I first made up my mind to pursue homesteading and started growing my own food, I had no idea where this path would lead me. All I knew was I was unhappy where I was in the city and in life, and I had to make a radical change for my own physical and mental well-being. Homesteading, gardening and this lifestyle of greater self-sufficiency and sustainability called to me; It lit a fire and a passion in me and gave me purpose and meaning, and the more I explored it, the more convinced I became that this was the path I was meant to be on.

Less than a decade later and not only am I still on this path with more enthusiasm in my heart and fire in my belly than ever before, but it’s also led me to connect with so many other amazing homesteaders, gardeners and people who are just as passionate about this lifestyle as I am.

This morning my humble little Instagram account was featured on @humanswhogrowfood which features amazing people growing food all over this beautiful planet. To be able to think of myself as a peer among these greats is beyond my wildest dreams when I first started out as a city girl with zero gardening or homesteading experience. It’s a testament to how far I’ve come, but also to the whole world of beautiful souls out there working to put more homegrown food on tables all across the globe.

Today, with everything going on in the world, I’m feeling reflective, honoured and humbled to be a part of such an amazing community of people. Thank you to each and every one of you! The world may be messed up, but we’re alright.

Also, go follow @humanswhogrowfood if you’re in need of a little faith in humanity right now. So many amazing people out there growing food and doing wonderful things! 💚
.
.
.
#humanswhogrowfood #peoplewhogrowfood #homesteadersofinstagram #growfoodnotlawns #homegrown #gardenersofinstagram
...

© The House & Homestead | All Rights Reserved | Legal

Crafted with ♥ by Inscape Designs