The Circle: The Benefits of Yurt Living for Anyone Dreaming of an Off-Grid Lifestyle


By guest contributor Jade Cardy of Yurtigo.
 
If you've ever dreamed of living an off-grid lifestyle but worry you don't have the skills or knowledge, take some inspiration and advice from Jade and Devin's story. Both moved from the big city to pursue a simpler life living off-grid in a yurt in rural Canada. Despite little to no experience with off-grid living, they're surviving their first winter, learning to be resourceful and self-reliant as they go and living out an adventure many of us only ever dream of!It was early October when my partner and I packed up our one bedroom apartment into the largest u-Haul we could find, picked up our yurt kit, and drove five hours into the mountains, with three kitties voicing their opinions the entire way.
 
We didn’t have jobs, just a plot of land on a friend’s 40 acres and a dream. We were on our way to starting a whole new chapter in our lives.
 
 

A little background info

I endured a back injury in 2012 which never healed itself. It left me in chronic pain, unable to work, and miserable. I lost my sense of self, had no idea who this new me was, and frankly I wasn’t ready to accept or even want to get to know this new me.  Depression came for a very long visit, and anxiety decided to drop in on the party somewhere along the way.
 
Like anyone else, I needed a purpose, and up until the injury, work had been my purpose. Having had that taken away -plus the stress of no income and the constant, insistent pain- I was wasting away.
 
Since I had no income, we had to come up with clever ways to get by each month, since we couldn’t live off just my partner’s income. The free list on craigslist and bidding wars sites became my shopping mall. I also had to sell my car and my condo. With the way real estate prices were climbing in the city, we knew we wouldn’t be able to afford anything, so we had to think outside the box. And that is when we came up with “The Circle,” or more specifically, yurt living. 
 
 
 
 
 

 

The journey to yurt living begins

We had a friend in the North Okanagan with 40 acres of land who invited us to come live on his farm and be apart of the community. We found a local company that manufactured yurts, so we went for a visit to see one set up and fell in love. After placing our order, waited the 8-9 weeks production time, and packed and sold and scrambled to get ready for our life makeover. 
 
Another factor that contributed to choosing yurt living was my experience in nature versus in the city. I suffer extreme insomnia when in the city, yet I noticed that when we would go camping out in the wilderness, I slept much better, and was subsequently happier. With debt piling up around us and happiness seeming just beyond our door, it seemed a no brainer to take the plunge.
 
If you've ever dreamed of living an off-grid lifestyle but worry you don't have the skills or knowledge, take some inspiration and advice from Jade and Devin's story. Both moved from the big city to pursue a simpler life living off-grid in a yurt in rural Canada. Despite little to no experience with off-grid living, they're surviving their first winter, learning to be resourceful and self-reliant as they go and living out an adventure many of us only ever dream of!

The entranceway to our yurt. Home sweet dome!

 
What an adjusment! The hardest part has been trying to prepare for the obstacles that come our way. First obstacle, the yurt company forgot to include two integral parts of our floor, so construction halted for a week while we waited for the yurt company to send reinforcements. The weather had dropped down to an unexpected minus 12 degrees Celcius, and we were living out of a tent!
 

Fortunately we had a shipping container holding all of our stuff while we built the yurt, so we rearranged our belongings and set up home in the shipping container, which wasn’t much warmer than the tent to be completely honest. Our water also froze during this freak cold spell, obstacle number two. And, since we moved in October, we didn’t have the spring and summer months to help prepare for winter, so we are behind on fire wood, but we are slowly catching up. There is something meaningful about cutting wood during a big snowfall. It’s a very humbling, yet happy feeling. 

If you've ever dreamed of living an off-grid lifestyle but worry you don't have the skills or knowledge, take some inspiration and advice from Jade and Devin's story. Both moved from the big city to pursue a simpler life living off-grid in a yurt in rural Canada. Despite little to no experience with off-grid living, they're surviving their first winter, learning to be resourceful and self-reliant as they go and living out an adventure many of us only ever dream of!

What I miss most about city life are my family and friends. I must admit, I also miss the free list on craigslist. Living in a denser population equates to more free, “disposable” items.

But while I thought I would miss the convenience of everything, I realized after I left the city that convenience was what I needed to escape, because the conveniences I had become entagled in were not healthy. They were self-destructive, which did not help my depression, but rather fueled it.
 
What I don’t miss are the invisible moments with strangers where no one interacts, the busy traffic and rush hour, transit, fast food joints on every corner, people on top of people, the public drug abuse and homelessness crisis, the apathy and negativity, the rainy weather… I could go on, but I’ve moved on from that place.
 
So has this helped my depression? A resounding yes! It has given me purpose again.
 
The greatest reward in all of this has been the knowledge acquired. Not just learning about waste management systems, composting systems, solar power, wood stoves and how they work with updraft, but also learning how to be self-sustaining and self-sufficient. All of this has been invaluable. Coming up with creative ways to solve problems with only what’s on hand is very fulfilling. It’s definitely a confidence boost putting your skills and knowledge to the actual test. 
 
If you've ever dreamed of living an off-grid lifestyle but worry you don't have the skills or knowledge, take some inspiration and advice from Jade and Devin's story. Both moved from the big city to pursue a simpler life living off-grid in a yurt in rural Canada. Despite little to no experience with off-grid living, they're surviving their first winter, learning to be resourceful and self-reliant as they go and living out an adventure many of us only ever dream of!

Setting up our yurt. Here we have the frame set up and we’re adding the snow and wind kit made of 31 solid pine lodge poles.

So has this helped my depression? A resounding yes! It has given me purpose again.
I am responsible for stoking the fire and keeping our home warm. I am responsible for ensuring there is enough wood to run the wood stove. My responsibilities include small but important tasks that contribute to the household. 
 
 

The humble fulfillment of living close to the land

There is nothing more gratifying than laying in bed after a long day of preparation work, looking out the toono of the home we built with our bare hands and gazing up at the stars above, while hearing the animals talking back and forth. Or listening to a wind storm whirling around outside, or the rain and snow pelting against our vinyl roof. It’s very satisfying and humbling being so close to Mother Nature. 
 
If you've ever dreamed of living an off-grid lifestyle but worry you don't have the skills or knowledge, take some inspiration and advice from Jade and Devin's story. Both moved from the big city to pursue a simpler life living off-grid in a yurt in rural Canada. Despite little to no experience with off-grid living, they're surviving their first winter, learning to be resourceful and self-reliant as they go and living out an adventure many of us only ever dream of!

Lightning seen through the toono, the “skylight” in the roof of the yurt.

 
This experience has also given me something to write home about, so to speak. I can help others achieve a similar goal by sharing my experiences. Being in a constant state of learning is what does it for me. It’s invigorating and refreshing and the best confidence boost.
 
Keeping my brain active has been crucial to staving off depression. Usually there is some challenge that we wake up to, whether it’s figuring out how to beat the condensation, or testing the damper on the wood stove to see what setting creates the maximum burn time, or figuring new and inventive ways to create visually appealing storage, since our yurt is only 314 square feet.
 
My depression still tries to rear its ugly head, especially when a disaster is looming or has occurred, but I’ve accepted that these challenges are positive. So I try to keep my mindset in check by not letting obstacles ruin this experience, and revelling in the feeling of accomplishment when one disaster is averted. 
 
 

 

Some advice for anyone looking to try yurt living

– If you are moving somewhere with four seasons, move in the warmer months. Take advantage of the warm weather to prepare for the winter.

– Do not place items up against the wall in a yurt. Yurts need to breathe since they are not airtight. This will help immensely in minimizing condensation.

– Insulate your water reservoirs.

– Get thermometers. You will want to know the temperatures inside the yurt and of the wood stove.

– Have candles and flashlights nearby.

– Keep track of what is in your moving boxes. If you are like us and did not downsize enough prior to the move, you might have a shipping container full of boxes. It makes life ten times easier if you can locate an item without having to open all the boxes first.

– Rocks are your best friend when it comes to dirt roads. Collect large rocks and place them where it gets muddy and rutty. Then lay smaller rocks and gravel overtop. The large rocks provide a base so the gravel doesn’t get swallowed up by the mud. It also helps immensely for gaining traction.  

– We opted for the standard, non-glass windows for our yurt. There is no insulation over them, so in the winter cold creeps in fast. Placing wool blankets over the windows, while impeding your view, will keep a lot of the warmth in. The toono provides all the natural light needed, so the windows can be covered up.

– Reliable internet is hard to get outside of major cities. If internet is important to you, research it before you commit to moving to a location. Also, shipping containers act as giant Faraday cages, so don’t expect to get the best reception or connection when inside of one. 

– Try to locate your closest cell tower and/or satellite locations prior to placing your yurt or shipping container.

– Look into the Humanure composting toilet system. It is cost-effective, and brilliant, in my humble opinion. Zero smell, even when I add the cats’ business. It truly amazes me. 

– Make sure your wood stove is rated to heat at least three times your square footage. We opted for the smallest Jotul wood stove, and it has far exceeded our expectations. In the future we may opt to get the larger Jotul, for the sole reason of not having to stoke it as often. Since I don’t sleep consistently due to my pain, having to stoke our fire every four hours or so throughout the night isn’t too bad. Though I can imagine it might bother others.

– Make sure your chimney cap is vertical. Ours was slanted slightly and it melted all the snow on a nearby tree, which ran right back down the chimney pipe, creating steam (which we originally mistook for smoke and thought our chimney was broken) and a goopy mess.

– Wood ash is an amazing resource. We use it in our composting systems, as well as on icey and snowy walkways. It provides great traction. We even have a bucket of ash in the car in case we get stuck in the snow somewhere. 

– Get a good water filtration system. With the Berkey that we chose, we can melt snow on the stove if we needed to and filter it through. If it came down to it, we could even take river or puddle water, run it through the Berkey, and it would be safe to drink.

 
 

A typical day in the life…

If you've ever dreamed of living an off-grid lifestyle but worry you don't have the skills or knowledge, take some inspiration and advice from Jade and Devin's story. Both moved from the big city to pursue a simpler life living off-grid in a yurt in rural Canada. Despite little to no experience with off-grid living, they're surviving their first winter, learning to be resourceful and self-reliant as they go and living out an adventure many of us only ever dream of!

Wake up with the sun. Our yurt has a toono which acts like a giant skylight. It’s a nice way to wake up and has done wonders getting my Circadian rhythm back in check, which has aided my sleeping habits immensely.
 
Stoke the fire and scoop the ash. Get it raging to boil water for coffee, tea and bannock. I also have to stoke the wood stove throughout the day and try to keep the temperature inside around 20 degrees Celcius to dry out the condensation that collects around the edges. 
 
Warm water on the stove to clean dirty dishes.
 
Empty the grey water bucket. Since we don’t have running water, we have a faucet and sink set up with a bucket underneath catching the grey water.
 
Cut wood. Since we moved here in October, we weren’t ready for winter, so we have to go cut wood to sustain us throughout the colder months. Some of the wood we have to dry out inside, near the wood stove.
 
Once a week we have to switch out the bucket on our Humanure composting toilet and empty it into the dedicated compost, which in 2 years will become fertilizer for the garden.
 
Once a week we have to fill the Berkey water filter. We have access to well water and so we run it through the Berkey. Since some of our water has frozen, we have to bring the 5 gallon jugs inside to thaw near the wood stove, then pour them into the Berkey.
 
Since we don’t have running water, once a week we drive into town to the public swimming pool for a swim, hot tub, sauna and shower. This is one of my favourite days as we get to visit the thrift stores as well.
 
Once a week we offer our help to the farm and aid in whatever task needs to be done at that time.
 
There are still tasks that we are doing to help set up our home, such as stuffing insulation under the yurt and building a nice rock wall around the outer edges. 
 
To follow our story, find us on Facebook and Instagram as Yurtigo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

4 Comments

  1. Melissa

    What an awesome article! I’m currently in a big city, that gives me regular panic attacks from the noise, but this year we are starting our search for rural property. I would love to set up a yurt like you did, but my husband isn’t as excited about circle living.

    I’d love to know more about yurts in winter. Obviously, they originated in cold climates, but most of the off-grid yurt info I find out there is for warmer, dry climates. Can you insulate them so they have better heat retention?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hey Melissa,

      I totally hear you about the noise and the panic attacks. That’s one reason why we moved out of the city too. The property we live on now is still just off the highway and the traffic noises still give me anxiety and I suffer from panic attacks too so I totally understand. Our ultimate goal is to find a quiet, rural property off of a country side road (preferably a dead end!).

      I’m not sure what the options are for insulation… This post was written by a guest contributor so I will pass on questions to her. But I do know she mentioned putting blankets over windows in the window to help insulate them. I’ll see if she might be able to provide a better answer.

      All the best and hopefully you’ll be out of the city soon too!

      Anna

      Reply
  2. Ruthie

    I have never heard of a yurt, so this was interesting!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Ruthie,

      I had once stayed in yurt when I was travelling but had never considered living in one until Jade shared her story with me. With the whole “tiny house” movement along with more people looking to move off-grid, I think yurt-living might just gather steam too!

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
You Might Also Like
What does it really mean to be self-reliant?

What does it really mean to be self-reliant?

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about what it really means to be “self-reliant.”  We talk a lot about self-reliance (or self-sufficiency) in the homesteading community, and outwardly it may seem as if the goal of “achieving” self-reliance is what ultimately...

read more

How to Make Your Own Indoor Grow Light Stand

How to Make Your Own Indoor Grow Light Stand

* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   If you grow plants from seed (or if you want to), you’re likely going to want to start a few of them indoors. And if you start your seeds indoors,...

read more

And then there were 3 😔

Despite fending off an eagle attack the other day, a sneaky raccoon got into the chicken run early this morning and took out one of our girls.

Having animals die is definitely the hardest part of homesteading, but it’s a reality of this lifestyle that everyone must come to terms with sooner or later.

While we care for our chickens and want to give them the best life possible while they’re here, we understand that they’re livestock, not pets, and that we’re not the only creatures who see them as a food source.

Luckily we have a new flock of up-and-comers who will be ready to lay in a few months. Until then, egg production around here is gonna be pretty scarce.
...

15 2

So this is 35…

I decided to read my horoscope today (since it’s my birthday and all). I don’t really buy into the horoscope predictions, but I do think there’s something to be said for the personality traits we’re born with when the stars are aligned just so. Here are a few snippets that I found to be almost eerily on point:

“Tauruses born on May 18 are characterized by love of freedom and independence…They possess extraordinary creative energy, and they are never without an important cause to champion. They enjoy taking risks, but only when they believe the risk really matters.

As a rule, most decided early in life what they wanted to do and are not likely to deviate from that path. Their independent spirit makes them ideally suited to careers where they are their own boss, or are at least autonomous within a larger structure.

May 18 people want to make it on their own. No matter how successful they become, they never forget their roots and may even draw upon them for inspiration.”

Every year on my birthday I reflect on where I’m at, where I’m headed and where I’ve come from, and all I can say is that each year I’m only more grateful to be living life on my own terms, doing what I love most next to the people I love more than anything else in the world.

I’ll never forget where I came from and I’ll never have any regrets, because I wouldn’t be right where I am now without all of the experiences -good, bad or otherwise- that I’ve had along the way.

I knew when I was a little girl that I wanted to be a writer and a content creator. Homesteading came a little later in life, but when I knew, I knew.

I hope to be doing what I love and sharing it with you all for the next 35 years too! (Well, actually, if I’m being honest, I’d like to retire and throw my phone in the river long before that;) But until that day comes, thanks for being here to celebrate life with me today and every day. Cheers to another turn around the sun 🍻
...

54 10

My daughter stayed overnight at her grandma’s last night, and this morning when I talked to my mom she said “Evelyn told me she’s never been to the doctor before.”

Proudly, I replied “no, she hasn’t, because she’s never needed to.” This is thanks in large part to the fact that we keep a well stocked natural medicine cabinet at home and do our best to treat everyday illnesses and ailments ourselves.

Having a well-stocked home apothecary (and the know-how to use herbal and natural medicine at home) is yet another important piece of the self-sufficiency puzzle, and one that we’re working on a lot right now, both in our home and in my membership program, the Society of Self-Reliance.

If herbal medicine and building a home apothecary is on your to-do list as well, I’ve got some great tips and a printable checklist of items you’ll want to start stocking up on now so you’re prepared to make all sorts of medicinal preparations in time for cold and flu season later this year.

This is also a great time to plant certain medicinal herbs so that you’ve got a personal, sustainable supply of herbal medicine at home, because who knows what supply chain issues are gonna hit next!

To help make building and stocking your home apothecary or natural medicine cabinet a little easier, I compiled a list of all the ingredients I like to keep on hand for making my own medicinal preparations, as well as a suggested list of herbs to start growing or stocking up on, and some other great resources to help you get started preparing and using your own herbal medicine at home.

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead to read the full article and download the checklist, or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/stock-a-home-apothecary/
...

34 1

Stinging nettles are one of my favourite things to forage for in early spring. They’re ready to harvest well before just about anything is ready in our garden, and they’re a superfood as well as a medicinal plant packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals including vitamins A, B, C & K, calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus and iron, plus they’re super high in protein.

As a medicinal plant, nettles are a natural antihistamine and can help with season allergies, they have properties that reduce inflammation and especially joint inflammation and arthritis, they can be used to treat of urinary tract infections and enlarged prostate symptoms, the e been shown to lower blood pressure and control blood sugar and more!

Some people even swear by harvesting stinging nettles with their bare hands as the sting itself is said to help with muscle and joint pain/arthritis!

I, however, am not that brave. I definitely recommend wearing gloves, long sleeves, long pants and boots when harvesting stinging nettles! But the good news is that once you cook or dry the nettles, they no longer sting you. My favourite way to prepare them is to dry them and enjoy them as a herbal tea! But they’re good sautéed in stir fry or added to soups (in place of spinach or Kale) too. Whatever you do, just don’t put them fresh into a salad!

Stinging nettles grow wild all over North America (as well as other places), and spring is the best time to forage for them. To learn how to safely identify them, harvest them and prepare/preserve them, check out the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/harvest-and-use-stinging-nettles/

Have you ever foraged for stinging nettle before?
...

89 14

If you're looking to increase production in your own home garden, you know how important bees and other pollinators are to your overall yield.⁠

Honeybees get a lot of the glory, and for good reason: It's said that honeybees alone are responsible for pollinating 80% of our fruits and vegetables! Not to mention, they make honey... Sweet, glorious, highly nutritious and DELICIOUS honey!⁠

In this day and age of global food shortages, we need to do whatever we can to help increase food production at home and abroad, and helping honeybees is one of the best ways to do just that.⁠

Click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/3-easy-ways-to-help-save-the-bees/ to learn what you can do at home to help save the bees, and the many, MANY reasons why it matters!⁠
...

24 1

I don't know about you, but around here spring officially marks the beginning of what we call "busy season."⁠

I always remind myself, though, that the payoff from the work we put in at this time of year is so totally worth the extra elbow grease and long hours.⁠

The seeds we sow now will provide us with food and medicine to stock our pantry and apothecary with in the summer and fall.⁠

The projects we start now will (hopefully) be finished and ready to serve us later in the year.⁠

And the deep cleaning and organizing we do now in our homes will set the stage and the tone for the rest of the season.⁠

Personally, I don't operate very well in a disorganized, messy or dirty environment. Whether I'm working or just relaxing, if my home is in disarray I feel like I can't fully concentrate on or enjoy whatever I'm doing.⁠

For most of the year this means sticking to a daily routine of tidying up and light cleaning when necessary. But in the spring, I like to take a few days to deep clean our home so that the rest of the season runs smoother; So that when I'm in the thick of gardening and harvesting and preserving season, I'm not also contending with dirt and stains and pine needles from Christmas!⁠

That being said, I don't like to use any commercially produced chemical cleaners, so I always make sure to keep a few natural ingredients on hand to get the job done.⁠

Over the years I've tried a lot of store-bought "natural" cleaners, and honestly I haven't been impressed with most of them. In fact, I find some white vinegar, baking soda, dish soap, water and a few essential oils are all I really need to clean most of my house!⁠

If the spring cleaning bug has bit you too, be sure to check out my DIY Spring Cleaning Recipes via the link in my bio. Every recipe is made with simple, natural ingredients that you probably have on hand already. I also like to add essential oils to my cleaning products for their scent and natural cleaning and disinfecting power, but you can omit them if you like:)⁠

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/spring-cleaning-recipes/
...

25 0

If there's one thing we should all be doing to hedge against looming food shortages and inflation right now, it's growing some of our own food at home.⁠

I've been preaching the many benefits of homegrown food for years now... Long before any of the madness we're currently experiencing took hold.⁠

A couple years ago when I launched my first gardening course, I mentioned in my sales video that we were just one emergency situation away from grocery store shelves being cleared out entirely. Within two weeks of that video, the pandemic hit, and the rest is history.⁠

The fact is, whether you're worried about shortages, the skyrocketing price of EVERYTHING, or you simply want to eat better, healthier foods free from GMOs and chemical sprays, learning how to grow even a little bit of your own organic food at home puts power and food security back in your hands.⁠

That's exactly why I’ve teamed up with 16+ other speakers for the Backyard Vegetable Gardener's Summit: A free, 3-day online event where you can learn how to get started or get better at growing food and creating your own personal grocery store, right in your own backyard!⁠

Here are just a few of the presentations coming up this week:⁠

🌱 7 Ways To Maximize Space In Your Urban Garden⁠
🌱 Creating a Personal Seed Bank⁠
🌱 How to Generate Income From Your Garden⁠
🌱 Easy Ways to Quickly Improve Your Garden Soil⁠
🌱 Indoor Container Gardening⁠
🌱 Growing Turmeric & Ginger at Home⁠
🌱 How to Use Succession Planting for Higher Yields⁠

And more!⁠

Plus, don't miss my masterclass where I teach you everything you need to know to grow a BUMPER CROP OF TOMATOES in your backyard! 🍅🍅🍅⁠

From starting your seeds to planting out and caring for your tomato plants all season long, I'll show you the exact method we use to grow hundreds of pounds of tomatoes at home for fresh eating and preserving each year.⁠

The summit officially starts TODAY! If you haven't registered yet, click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/bvgs to save your seat and start watching and learning right away!
...

79 3

“When I think of self-reliance, I think of any ability to rely less on ‘the system.’”

I sat down with Ashley Constance from @dirtypawshomestead and the @alittleselfreliant podcast to talk about what it means to be self-reliant, if it’s even possible to be 100% self-reliant and why it’s a goal worth striving for even if complete and total self-reliance isn’t possible.

Be sure to check out the full interview in the latest issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine!

Subscribe @ modernhomesteadingnmagazine.com

I’d love to know, what are you currently doing to become a little (more) self-reliant? Let me know in the comments!👇
...

26 2

What self-reliance skills do YOU want to learn most??

If you've been reading my posts or getting my emails lately, you've probably heard me mention my brand new private membership program called the Society of Self-Reliance, which is set to launch for the first time TOMORROW!!!

I'm so excited about this project as it's something I've been dreaming of creating for a long time. With everything going on in the world right now, I knew I had to stop overthinking it and just go for it!

The membership will include video lessons and downloads on a wide range of topics related to homesteading and self-reliant living, as well as a private community message board (ie. OFF social media;)

Each month we'll focus on a different theme or aspect of self-reliance, and then once a month we'll get together for a live group coaching call to discuss that month's topic (and whatever other questions you have and self-reliance topics you'd like to discuss!)

Since we're just starting out, I'm offering new members a special introductory rate of just $20/month. This is the only time I plan on offering it for this price, so if you want to get in and lock in at this rate, you'll be able to do so as soon as the doors open tomorrow!

If you haven't yet joined the waitlist, click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/society to add your name and save your spot. Waitlist members will be the first to know when enrollment opens tomorrow morning!

Hopefully you're just as excited as I am about this new venture! I've already got the first 8 video lessons up, as well as a few sweet bonuses too:)

We'll be kicking things off with the theme "Grow Your Own Groceries," and then we'll move into other topics like herbal medicine and food preservation over the summer months. But I'd also love to know from you, what self-reliance topics would YOU like to learn most over the next few months?

Let me know below 👇

I hope to see you inside!
...

27 0

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about what it really means to be "self-reliant."

We talk a lot about self-reliance (or self-sufficiency) in the homesteading community, and outwardly it may seem as if the goal of "achieving" self-reliance is what ultimately drives many of us to live this lifestyle in the first place.

But what does self-reliance look like in the 21st century? Is it actually achievable, or just a pipe dream?

Is it even possible to be truly self-reliant?

A few years ago, Forbes published an article titled Dear Homesteaders, Self-Reliance is a Delusion.

In the article, the author argues that "self-reliance is for the most part a myth. Unless they live in an extremely remote region, use all homemade tools, and will refuse the safety net if they need it, most homesteaders are far from self-reliant."

While he makes some compelling points, but I've always felt as if he missed the point of what self-reliance actually means in real life.

No man (or woman) is an island. None of us can ever be 100% self-reliant without ever relying on anyone other than ourselves. But that doesn't mean that we should give up trying altogether.

Even one small step toward being more self-sufficient is a step in the right direction.

Maybe the point is not to ever BECOME self-reliant, but rather to become MORE self-reliant as we progress on our journey. Maybe self-reliance isn't a destination, but a pursuit.

Like just about everything that's worth doing, working toward greater self-reliance and independence is worth doing imperfectly. It's better to take a single step in the right direction than no step at all.

I decided to unpack this in more detail on the blog this week. (Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to thehouseandhomestead.com/what-is-self-reliance to read the full article).

With the doors to the Society of Self-Reliance opening in just a couple more days, I wanted to be sure I can confidently provide an answer to the question "what is self-reliance?"

But I’d also love to hear what YOU think!

Is self-reliance just a delusion? Is it an achievable goal? Or is it more about the journey than the destination?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!
...

38 0

🌱 Have you started any seeds yet?

If not, NOW is the time!

March is a great time to start tomato seeds, peppers, lettuce, brassicas (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, etc.) and direct sow peas in most gardening zones.

Starting from seed is exponentially cheaper than buying starts from the nursery, especially is you’re growing on a larger scale. But seed starting supplies can add up quickly if you’re not careful.

In the spring issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, contributor Kayla Adams of @oatsandhoneyhomestead shares her best tips for finding cheap or even free seed starting supplies. From pots and lighting options to soil and the seeds themselves, Kayla covers everything you *actually* need to start your edible garden completely from seed (and not break the bank).

Check out the full article, along with a preview of the spring issue at modernhomesteadingmagazine.com

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead to SUBSCRIBE or login to the magazine library and read the full issue (for current subscribers).

What are you MOST excited to grow in your garden this year??

Let me know! 👇

#seedstarting #seeds #springgardening #growyourowngroceries
...

35 3

© The House & Homestead | All Rights Reserved | Legal