Terroir: How the Land Where We Live Influences the People We Become


Terroir (n): The characteristic taste and flavour of a crop (usually wine) or the characteristics of a people (often rural) that are imparted to them by the land they inhabit.

Origin: French

Root meaning: “Of the Earth/Soil.”

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all…

 

The Land That Gave Me Life

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

On the Burrard Street bridge, overlooking my hometown of Vancouver in my younger days.

I’m a west coast girl through and through. For those of you who don’t know, I was born and raised in Vancouver, BC, Canada. I’m proud of my roots. Growing up in the Pacific Northwest has had a profound impact on the person I am today. I don’t foresee myself ever leaving this coast. But I did spend most of my life trying to escape Vancouver.

Don’t get me wrong… As far as cities go, Vancouver is a beautiful one full of amazing people, eclectic culture and passionate soul. It’s perhaps the only city I’ve ever seen that seems to grow organically right out of the forests and the mountains and the sea that form its base. Perhaps that’s why Vancouver is full of “hippies” and nature buffs. It’s in our blood (or rather, our roots). But it’s a city nonetheless, and so many people want to own a piece of its wealth and beauty that it’s actually become difficult to live (and make a living) there. (Exit the hippies, enter the hipsters… Sigh).

The population has exploded over the years and everyone seems to be fighting for scraps over the few remaining affordable properties, often going into huge amounts of debt just to “own” a piece of air in an apartment building. 

The traffic is insane, and when I lived there I wasted hours of my life stuck between vehicles on the slow route to and from work, just trying to get through another day and pay the bills. For me, the stress of living in this city, magnificent as it could be, manifested itself in the form of anxiety, depression and a deep longing to be somewhere else.

I was unhappy playing the role of city/suburban girl trying to make it in the world every day of my life. I didn’t feel like I fit or belonged there. I knew deep down that I wanted to live somewhere quieter and more rural, where I could really connect to the land where I lived. 

Some people feel right at home in the city. I’ve known many of these people in my time; People who could never understand why I wanted to leave so bad. These people have the amazing ability to connect with the land even through the concrete that entombs it. Not me. I prefer the soil.

So about 5 or 6 years ago, Ryan and I decided to start “shopping around” for a new home, somewhere far from the concrete and city lights. To be honest, I think Ryan would have been quite happy to stay, but he knew how unhappy I was there and so he jumped onboard without hesitation. Gotta love that man for going along with all of my crazy dreams:)

 

The Search For Our Place In This World

We looked east to the rocky mountains and north to, well pretty much anywhere north of where we were. But neither of those directions felt quite right. In the end we decided to head west to Vancouver Island. 

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

Vancouver Island, as seen from the ferry.

Something about the west has always called to me. It’s where I feel most at home. Plus, we figured we could live a simpler, quieter, more rural life without having to give up the things we loved most about the west coast city we grew up in: the forests and the mountains and the sea, and definitely a little bit of that laid back west coast vibe that sadly gets drowned out in the city by the road rage and accompanying traffic noises.

While our journey to Vancouver Island is a story in and of itself, what I will say is that we never hesitated to make this crazy dream of moving out here and embarking on our homesteading journey a reality. We’ve been here 3 years now and we’ve never looked back. Hands down it was the best decision we’ve ever made, and although we have suffered our share or tragedies, traumas and hardships since we made the move here, I actually stop quite regularly here and look around me and say out loud to myself “Wow. I can’t believe I live here.” 

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

I finally feel like I’m on the right path and I love the place we’ve chosen for our forever home. But still, sometimes I wonder if maybe there’s an even better place for me somewhere else.

I’ve travelled the world pretty extensively, and I used to arrive in different places (both urban and rural) and wonder “Could I live here? Should I live here? What kind of life would I lead if I lived here? Could I become the person I want to be in this place?”

I considered moving to Europe after I studied in Vienna in my early twenties. I thought about Cape Town when I traveled to Africa shortly after. I thought about the east coast of Canada out on some craggy rock where the land drops off into the Atlantic Ocean. I definitely considered many places in Australia and New Zealand as I travelled and met amazing people and dove into and off of things over there. 

Could any of these places be home for me? There’s a whole world out there! How do I know if I’ve settled in the right place?

 

My Trip Back “Home”

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

Celebrating Evelyn’s second birthday at my family’s home in Vancouver.

Ryan and Evelyn and I travelled back to Vancouver a couple weekends ago to celebrate Evelyn’s 2nd birthday. It was awesome to see family and friends we hadn’t seen in a while and we definitely enjoyed that part of it. But every time we go back it seems to be even busier and the face of the whole city seems to be growing and changing at an astonishing rate. 

The farmland in our hometown of Richmond (a suburb of Vancouver) has ceded to high rises and mega-mansions for the super rich. What were once quiet, rural roads are now busy highways. Every time we go it feels less and less like home.

The day after Evelyn’s birthday party, we travelled into the south interior of our province to my family’s cabin in the heart of the Okanagan Valley. This is where Ryan and I got married (and engaged). It’s where my family has camped and vacationed since I was a baby and I have a lot of fond memories and a strong connection to this land.

 

Nature Calls

As soon as we got out of the city, I began to breathe easier again. I just feel better when I’m out in nature with more space and less noise.

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

A roadside stop on the way to the south interior: Evelyn, spotting gophers in Manning Park, BC.

As we drove the winding roads that twist through the peaks and valleys that lead the way to the south-centre of our province, I gazed out the window at the picturesque landscape, the quaint, small towns and the idyllic, pastoral farms, ranches and homesteads, old and new. I gazed out and I thought to myself, “this is nice. Maybe we should live here instead.”

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

In the Okanagan, orchards and vineyards spring up from the Earth with abundance. Peaches and plums and apricots and cherries and apples and bushels and bottles and barrels of grapes and wine make their way from farm to table every day in the heart of the summer (and all year round when preserved). It’s a beautiful place with an incredible ability to produce mass amounts of beautiful food and there is land to be had for much less than what we pay on the island. There are lakes to swim in and backcountry to hike in and plentiful wineries and vineyards to be toured. Maybe we should have moved here instead. Maybe we should in the future…

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

Wine touring in the Okanagan. At Poplar Grove winery in the Naramata Bench.

But after a few days of oo-ing and ah-ing at the beauty of this place, tasting and experiencing the best that the land here had to offer, it was time to go home. As beautiful as it is in this place, I wasn’t thriving here. Like a plant struggling to survive in the wrong climate and soil conditions, I was having trouble surviving here in the dead heat and dry air and desert-like conditions of the interior.

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

Sure, it was okay for a visit. But I was slowly wilting away here. My soul was being called back to the west; To the ocean; To our home on the island.

 

Home Is Where the Heart Yearns to Be

And so, as we travelled back through the peaks and valleys and forests and mountains and cities, across the Georgia Strait on the ferry to Vancouver Island and up the coast to our home, I finally realized there was no need to keep searching.

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

On the ferry back home.

Sure there are many other beautiful places on Earth that we could live. There are other oceans to reside by, other cities to live on the outskirts of, other countries that seem like lovely places to call home, and yes, there are far more wineries on the mainland than there are here on the island… Damn. 

But when we finally arrived back home to Vancouver Island, to the little dot on the map where we consciously chose to make our stand, I looked up at the clear, starry sky, felt the cool, dewy Earth beneath my feet, breathed a big sigh of relief and felt my leaves perk up again.

Just as the land gives life to the plants that we grow and helps to impart particular characteristics, flavours and subtle quirks on them, so does the land where we live help to determine our own fate. We are a product of our environment after all.

Our home in the Comox Valley, Vancouver Island.

I know in my heart that we chose this place for a reason; This is the place that will allow us to be the people we were meant to be. This is the land that will help us develop the full potential of our character. Like a fine wine, this is where we will age best.

I realized this all in a single instant, and I said to myself in that moment, “wow. I can’t believe we live here.” And at last, I knew we were finally home.


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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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When I graduated from university with a degree in journalism many years ago, I remember thinking that while I knew how to write, edit, interview, shoot, and handle just about every part of creating a publication from the editorial standpoint, I really had no clue how to actually get published, let alone how the printing process works.

Over the years I’ve followed my passion for writing, editing and creating content, figuring much of it out on my own. From creating my blog to “self-publishing” my own digital/print magazine for the last 4 years, I’ve taught myself most of the practical skills necessary for turning an idea into a publication and getting said publication in the hands and in front of the eyes of many hundreds of readers.

But now that I’ve joined forces with the team at @homesteadlivingmagazine and @freeportpress, we’re all able to level up and reach many THOUSANDS of print and digital readers together.

People are HUNGRY for tried and tested advice on homesteading and self-reliant living. There’s a huge movement happening right now as more people wake up to all of the corruption in the world and realize that many of the systems we have come to depend on are fragile and on the brink of collapse. People are ready to take matters into their own hands by growing their own food, preparing their own meals, becoming producers instead of merely consumers and taking control of their health, freedom, security and lives.

I’m so proud to not only be a part of this movement, but to be at the forefront of it with some of the most passionate, talented and driven individuals I could ask to work with.

Getting to meet and brainstorm with some of the team in person and tour the printing facilities over the last few days has opened up a whole new world of possibilities, not just for me, but for everyone who considers themselves part of the modern homesteading movement. We are growing faster than I could have ever imagined. We’re creating a system outside of the system! We’re charging full steam ahead and we invite you to climb aboard and join us for the ride:)

#homesteading #modernhomesteading #homesteadliving #selfsufficiency #selfreliance
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It’s been a minute since I popped into IG to say hi. (Hi! 👋) But before I share what’s been going on behind the scenes, I thought it would be a good time to (re)introduce myself, because I’ve never actually done that before!

My name’s Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader living in the beautiful Comox Valley on Vancouver Island. I live with my family (human, furry and feathered) on 1/4 acre property where we grow and preserve hundreds of pounds of our own food every year, and strive to live a more self-reliant lifestyle in all that we do.

I grew up in Vancouver and had pretty much zero experience homesteading before my husband, Ryan and I decided we wanted to escape the rat race, become less dependent on the modern industrial food system (and all modern industrialized systems), and dove head first into this lifestyle around a decade ago.

We packed up and moved to Vancouver Island where we live now, started our first garden, and the rest is pretty much history.

(Well, actually that’s not true… There have been A LOT of ups and downs, successes and failures, wins and losses, struggles, challenges and pivotal moments along the way, but those are stories for another day).

Over the past few years, our decision to follow a less conventional path that aims to break free (at least in some part) from “the system” has been affirmed over and over again. We all know for a fact now that our food system, healthcare system, financial system, transportation system and so much more are all really just a house of cards built on shaky ground. We’ve been lucky so far, but sooner or later it’s all liable to collapse.

But preparedness and security isn’t the only thing that drives us… The peace of mind I get knowing that everything we grow is 100% organic, and that the ingredients in our food, medicine, personal and household products are safe and natural is worth more than anything I could buy at the grocery store.

(I’m not perfect though. Not by a long shot. I still rely on the grocery store, on modern medicine, and on many modern conveniences to get by, but I balance it as much as I can:)

(Continued in comments…)
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I’m all about practical gifts; Gifts that will truly make life easier and contribute to my and my family’s wellbeing. And our family includes our animals!

One of the ways we make sure our chickens are taken care of is by letting them free range during the day, but making sure they’re locked up and safe from predators at night. But who wants to be up at the crack of dawn to open the coop, or wake up to a bloodbath because you forgot to close the coop the night before?

(The answer is obviously no one… No one wants that).

Automating our homesteading tasks as much as possible allows us to worry about other things and saves us a ton of time. Plus, it makes sure that things get taken care of, whether we remember or not.

Using an automatic chicken door has been a GAME CHANGER for us. It’s one of those lesser known homestead tools that can make all the difference, and I’m always recommending one to anyone who keeps chickens!

This chicken door from @chickcozy_ is so easy to install and use too, and right now you can get one for a steal during their Black Friday sale!

Save over $40 off an automatic chicken door, plus use my coupon code for an ADDITIONAL DISCOUNT!

Don’t forget to check out their chicken coop heaters too, which are also on sale right now:)

Whether you’re shopping for yourself or looking for the perfect gift for the chicken lover who has everything (which might also be yourself;) the @chickcozy_ automatic chicken door is one Christmas gift that won’t soon be forgotten!

Comment “Chicken” below for more info and to get my exclusive coupon code! 🐓

#chicken #chickens #chickendoor #chickcozyautodoor #chickcozy #chickensofinstagram #chickensofig #chickenlover #homesteadlife
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Yes, you read that right…

Modern Homesteading Magazine is coming to an end.

This decision has not come easily, but there’s a season for everything, and more and more I’m feeling called to transition out of this season and into the next in both life and business.

And so this final farewell issue is bittersweet. On the one hand, it’s the first ever annual issue, with 100 pages packed with brand new content that celebrates the best of the past 32 issues!

And it’s the first issue I’ve ever offered in PRINT!

But on the other hand, it marks the end of an era, and of this publication that I’ve absolutely had the pleasure of creating and sharing with you.

If you’re a digital subscriber, you will not be charged a renewal fee going forward, and will continue to have access to the digital library until your subscription runs out. As part of your subscription, you’re able to download and/or print each issue of you like, so that you never lose access to the hundreds of articles and vast amount of information in each issue.

Rather than subscribing, you can now purchase an all-access pass for a one-time fee of just $20, which gives you access to our entire digital library of issues.

Plus, for a limited time, when you purchase an all-access pass you’ll also get a gift certificate for a second all-access pass to gift to someone else.

I’m also still taking preorders for the print version of this special edition issue, but only for a few more weeks!

When you preorder the print issue, you’ll also get a digital copy of the special edition issue (this issue only), and will receive a print copy in the mail later this year (hopefully by Christmas so long as there are no shipping delays!)

Click the link in my profile or visit modernhomesteadingmagazine.com to check out the latest issue, purchase an all-access pass to the digital library and/or preorder the print issue today!

Thanks to everyone who has read the magazine over the past 4 years. I’m humbled and grateful for your support, and can’t wait to share whatever comes next:)

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It’s easy to romanticize homesteading, but the truth is that those homegrown vegetables, those freshly laid eggs, that loaf of bread rising on the counter, and that pantry full of home-canned food takes time, effort and dedication. It doesn’t “just happen” overnight!

But if you work on learning one new skill at a time and gain confidence in it before moving onto the next, one day you’ll be looking back and marvelling at how far you’ve come.

That’s where I’m at now. Life today looks a lot different than it did 10 years ago, when our homesteading and self-reliance journey was just beginning.

Back then we still lived in our city condo and were just beginning to dabble in all of this stuff. But my husband Ryan and I felt a sense urgency to start pursuing a more self-reliant lifestyle, and we committed to taking small steps, one day at a time to make that vision a reality.

Over the years we’ve continued to put one foot in front of the other, adding new skills and tackling new projects along the way that have helped us get to where we are today.

While there’s always more we want to learn and do, as I look around me right now, I’m so grateful that we took those first steps, especially considering what’s happened in the world over the past few years!

If you’re also feeling the urgency to take the first (or next) steps toward a more self-reliant life, this is your final reminder that today is the last day to join The Society of Self-Reliance and start levelling up your homesteading and self-sufficiency skills so that you’ve got what it takes to:

• Grow your own groceries
• Stock your pantry
• Create a natural home
• Get prepared
• Learn other important life skills like time management for homesteaders, goal setting and how to become your own handyman

And more!

If you’ve been feeling called to level up your self-reliance skills (because let’s be honest, we’re in for a wild ride these next few years with everything going on in the world), now is the time to heed that call.

Link in profile to enroll before midnight tonight, or go to thehouseandhomestead.com/society

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There are so many reasons to grow your own food at home:

💰 Saves you money at the grocery store
🍴 Healthier than conventionally grown food
🔑 increases your overall food security
🫙 Gives you an abundance to preserve and share

But perhaps the number one reason is because it just tastes better!

Not only does food taste better when it’s freshly picked or allowed to ripen on the vine, there’s something about putting in the work to grow something from a tiny seed and then getting to see it on your dinner plate that just makes it so much more satisfying than anything you’ll ever buy from the store.

Plus, having to wait all year for fresh tomatoes or strawberries or zucchinis to be in season makes that short period when they’re available just that much more exciting!

With the world spinning out of control and food prices continuing to rise, it’s no wonder more people are taking an interest in learning to grow their own food at home. But that also means changing our relationship with food and learning to appreciate the work that goes into producing it and the natural seasonality of organically grown fruits and vegetables.

(It also means learning to preserve it so you can make the most of it and enjoy homegrown food all year long).

In my online membership program, The Society of Self-Reliance, you’ll learn how to grow your own food, from seed to harvest, as well as how to preserve it so you can enjoy the fruits (and vegetables) of your labor all year long!

You’ll also learn how to grow and craft your own herbal medicine, detox your home, become your own handyman, and so much more (because self-reliance is about more than just the food that we eat… But that’s a pretty good place to start!)

The doors to the Society are now open for a limited time only. Click the link in my profile or go to thehouseandhomestead.com/society to learn more.

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If you’ve been watching events unfold over the past few years and you’re feeling called to start “cutting ties” with the system and begin reclaiming your independence, The Society of Self-Reliance was made for you!

When I first launched this online membership program last year, my goal was to create a one-stop resource where members could go to learn and practice every aspect of self-reliance, as well as a space to connect with other like-minded people pursuing the same goal. And that’s exactly what you’ll get when you join!

Here’s a glimpse of what you’ll learn inside the Society:

🌱 Food Security and Self-Sufficiency: Learn the art of growing and preserving your own food, ensuring you and your loved ones have access to nutritious meals year-round.

🌿 Natural Living and Herbal Medicine Mastery: Discover the secrets to creating a low-tox home and and to growing, making and using herbal remedies to support your family’s health, naturally.

🔨 Essential Life Skills: Learn essential life skills like time management, effective goal setting and practical DIY skills to become more self-sufficient.

As a member, you’ll enjoy:

📚 Monthly Video Lessons: Gain access to our ever-growing library of video lessons, with fresh content added each month.

📞 Live Group Coaching Calls: Participate in our monthly live group coaching calls, where we deep dive into a different self-reliance topic every month, and do live demonstrations and Q&A’s.

🏡 Private Community: Join our private community forum where you can ask questions, share your progress, and connect with like-minded individuals.

I only open the doors to The Society once or twice each year, but right now, for one week only, you can become a member for just $20/month (or $200/year).

In today’s world, self-reliance is no longer a luxury, a “cute hobby,” it’s a necessity. Join us inside The Society of Self-Reliance and empower yourself with the skills you need to thrive in the new world!

Link in profile or visit thehouseandhomestead.com/society to learn more.

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Got out for an early morning harvest today. Been up since 3am, contemplating life, the future and the past, the order of things…

There is a rumbling right now, not just in North America, but around the world. Many of us can feel it, and know we are on the precipice of something big.

I’d been hearing about this new song that’s become an overnight viral sensation, written by an (until now) unknown singer named Oliver Anthony. His new song Rich Men North of Richmond has had 14 million views on YouTube in the past week alone, so I decided to check it out.

I also saw a clip of him playing a Farmers Market last week, and anything that has to do with Farmers Markets always has my attention;)

I can’t tell you how many tears I’ve already cried listening to that song. If you’ve heard it already, you probably know what I’m talking about, and if you haven’t, I highly recommend giving it a listen. All I can say is it’s been a while since a song resonated so deeply with me, and in this strange new world, I know I’m not the only one.

One of the lines in Anthony’s song is “Livin’ in the new world, with an old soul,” and that’s something I think so many of us in the homesteading community can relate to.

Trying to cling to better days; To a simpler time; To the old ways, all while doing our best to get by in the new world.

The world has changed drastically in the last few years especially, and it’s set to change in immense ways over the next few years. Today I’m feeling thankful for people like @oliver_anthony_music_ who give a voice to what so many are feeling right now.

Know that if you’re feeling it too, you’re far from alone. And while the future may feel uncertain and even a little scary, remember that if we stand united, we the people are a force to be reckoned with.

(Continued in comments…)
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Another garlic harvest in the books!

Garlic is easily one of my favourite crops to grow. It’s pretty much a “set if and forget it” crop. We plant in the fall and leave it to overwinter, fertilize a couple times in the spring, start watering only once the ground starts to dry out, and then harvest in the summer. We can even plant a fall succession crop after our garlic if we want so it really makes great use of garden space all year round.

Over the years we’ve managed to become completely self-sufficient with garlic. We now grow enough to eat all year (and then some!), plus we save our own seed garlic and usually have extra to sell or give away. And around here fresh, organic garlic ain’t cheap, so it’s a good cash crop for anyone who’s serious about selling it.

It took me a few years to really get the hang of garlic, but it’s one crop I’m now very confident with (knock on wood, because it’s always when we make statements like this that next year’s crop fails! Lol.)

A while back I compiled a comprehensive guide to growing, harvesting and using garlic both as an edible and medicinal crop. This is usually only available as part of a paid bundle (or in the fall 2022 issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine if you’re a subscriber;), but for a limited time I’m offering it for free, no strings attached!

Plus you’ll also get access to my step-by-step video lesson on planting garlic so you can set yourself up for success with your garlic crop this year.

Comment “Garlic” below or head to thehouseandhomestead.com/garlic-guide to get your free copy!
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#garlic #garlicharvest #homesteading #selfsufficient #selfsufficiency #selfsufficientliving #selfreliance #homegrown #groworganic #growfoodnotlawns #gardenersofinstagram #homesteadersofinstagram
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Going through photos and videos from our trip to the @modernhomesteadingconference and the vast majority are of our daughter having the time of her life!

Even if I personally got nothing else out of this gathering (which I most certainly did), watching her discover her own love of this lifestyle outside of what we do at home made my heart grow three sizes!

Homesteading is about so much more than homegrown food and self-reliance. It’s about passing on invaluable skills and an understanding of and respect for our connection to the land that provides for us to the next generation.

Being around so many other kids and families who are also pursuing a homesteading lifestyle helped show our little one that this is a movement that is so much bigger and greater than what our own family does on our little plot of land. This is a lifestyle worth pursuing, with a community unlike any other.

Glad to be back home and more excited than ever to involve my kids in everything we’re doing. But also, I think I speak for my whole family when I say we can’t wait to go back someday!
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#homesteading #modernhomesteading #raisinglittles
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If you’re simply looking for ways to save a little extra cash this summer and live well for less, here are 12 tried and tested frugal living tips for summer that you can use to save money this season without sacrificing a thing.
Head over using the link in my bio!
https://thehouseandhomestead.com/12-frugal-living-tips-summer/
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