No-Bake Whipped Pumpkin Pie


* This article contains an affiliate link. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.

 

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It’s made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!

* * *

Thanksgiving wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without pumpkin pie. But if I’m being totally honest, I’ve never really liked it! 

Not because I don’t like pumpkin pie in and of itself, but because growing up I was subjected to my share of store-bought imposters and a few “homemade” pumpkin pies whose ingredients lists included a can of store-bought pumpkin purée and a pre-made pie crust that may as well have been cardboard. Quite frankly, by the time I was an adult I was all but completely turned off by pumpkin pie, and would regularly skip dessert at Thanksgiving.

When my now husband and I first started hosting Thanksgiving dinners a few years ago, I didn’t bother with a pumpkin pie. So I cooked dinner and I let our guests bring dessert. It didn’t much matter what they brought as I was in the habit of skipping dessert at Thanksgiving anyway, on account of my history with dense, bland and boring pumpkin pie.

And yet, I’m a pumpkin romantic. I, like so many others, go crazy for fall and for pumpkin spice and the pumpkin patch and for all things pumpkin and burnt orange and beautiful this time of year. So naturally, when my husband began reminiscing and raving about the pumpkin pies his mother used to make at Thanksgiving when he was young, I was intrigued.

I voiced my aversion to pumpkin pie to him and listed my reasons for disliking it. But he assured me that his mother’s pie was different. It wasn’t at all dense because it was whipped. The flavours were spot on because it was homemade, and the crust wasn’t that dry store-bought stuff because it was made out of gingersnap cookie crumbs and butter. It sounded pretty good, and after a couple years of him asking me to make it, I decided to give it a go last year.

 

The pumpkin pie that puts all others to shame

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!
I played around with the spice level a bit and swapped out canned pumpkin for real pumpkins that I puréed fresh, and then I folded in luscious hand-whipped cream to make it all light and fluffy and decadent without the density. 

OMG! Not only was that pumpkin pie the BEST pumpkin pie I had ever eaten, it was quickly gobbled up by every one of our guests, even the self-proclaimed pumpkin-pie haters like my former self. And with that, it became a Thanksgiving tradition in our house.

Naturally, I made it again this year with pumpkins that we grew ourselves. Adding the homegrown factor in truly gave it that next-level touch of freshness and tastiness. There’s just something about growing your own food that makes it taste better. 

Maybe it’s because of the history we have with the food that we grow ourselves; The connection to food that was sown and grown and harvested with our own two hands. Our pie was months in the making, from the seeds that we started indoors last spring to the struggles we had with pumpkins falling off the vine during a bout of blossom end rot this summer, all the way to the harvest this fall. Knowing exactly where and how the pumpkins were grown (and being a part of the sweat equity that went into growing them) truly made this pie taste all the sweeter.

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!

Even if you don’t grow your own pumpkins, preparing everything from scratch makes everything taste better and helps you to appreciate your food that much more. And that’s what Thanksgiving is all about: good food and gratitude:)

 

How to make whipped pumpkin pie from scratch (with real pumpkins!)

 

Prepare your crust

You start by making your own pie crust by combining 2 cups of gingersnap cookie crumbs with ½ cup of melted butter and then press that into a pie plate. You don’t even need to bake your crust! Just refrigerate until solid! 

The gingersnap cookies can be store-bought, or if you really want everything to be made from scratch you can make a batch of homemade gingersnap cookies ahead of time and use those! Just throw them in a blender or food processor to make cookie crumbs. 

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!

*If you would rather have a traditional pie crust instead of a ginger cookie one, you can easily whip up a batch of this easy homemade all-purpose pie crust. Just pre-bake your crust, allow it to cool and then pour your pumpkin pie mixture in when ready. Refrigerate until solid and then serve!

 

Prepare your pumpkin pie filling

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!While you could use store-bought canned pumpkin pie filling for this recipe, I encourage you to try using fresh pumpkins. Preparing pumpkin purée from scratch (whether using your own homegrown pumpkins or organic pumpkins bought from your local farmers market or pumpkin patch) is easy and sooo much better than spooning out a glob of store-bought, canned pumpkin purée that could have come from anywhere. Oh, and did you know that canned “pumpkin” is usually not pumpkin at all?

Dr. Oz himself exposed the canned pumpkin myth on his show last year. Turns out, the USDA is pretty flexible with the definition of “pumpkin,” so often your canned pumpkin will actually be some other type of canned squash. Now, that’s not a big deal, but doesn’t it feel like you’re getting ripped off a bit? Plus, different squashes taste different! There’s no substitute for a true sugar pumpkin, which is what any authentic pumpkin pie is typically made with.

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!

The great thing is you have the power to know (and decide) exactly what is in your pumpkin pie by making your pumpkin purée from scratch. You’ll also know what is not in your pie, including preservatives and added ingredients you didn’t ask for.

The pumpkin purée is easy to make. All you need to do is cut a couple medium-sized sugar pumpkins in half, scoop out the innards leaving the skin and flesh behind (just like when carving a pumpkin), and then roast the pumpkin halves flesh side down (skin side up) on a baking tray.

Once the flesh is nice and soft and not stringy, scoop it out of the skin and toss it in a blender or food processor. Blend until smooth and voilà! You’ve got pumpkin purée!

You’ll need two cups of pumpkin purée for one pie, but you can use any leftover purée to eat fresh, to make put in the freezer, or even to make some homemade pumpkin spice syrup to add to coffees (so much better than Starbucks!)

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!

*Note: If you do your own home canning and food preserving, please note that it is NOT SAFE to can pumpkin purée at home. You may pressure can cubed pumpkin, but puréed pumpkin is too dense to can at home as home canners do not reach high enough temperatures to kill all dangerous bacteria. You can freeze homemade pumpkin purée if you like, or just store pumpkins in your pantry (they keep for a long time) and make this pie filling fresh!

And don’t forget to save the pumpkin seeds! Wash them, dry them and toss them in butter and salt and then throw them on a baking sheet at 300ºF for about half an hour and then eat them like popcorn! Any leftover pumpkin “guts” can be composted along with the skin and stem, meaning every part of your pumpkin gets utilized!

 

Assemble your pie

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!Once you have your two cups of puréed pumpkin, add in your pumpkin pie spices (I found the perfect blend is 2 teaspoons of cinnamon and ¼ teaspoon each of ground nutmeg, cloves, ginger and allspice). Add ¼ teaspoon of salt and mix that all into your pumpkin purée. 

Then, over medium heat, stir in some heavy cream, a few egg yolks, brown sugar and gelatin (to help your pie filling set), remove from heat, pop in the fridge until cool and then fold in some whipped cream to make your filling light and fluffy. Then spoon it all into your prepared crust and let set in the fridge for a few hours or overnight. When it’s time for pie, it’s all ready to serve and enjoy!

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!

This pie admittedly takes a bit more work than making a homemade pie with store-bought pumpkin pie filling and pie crust, and a lot more work than picking up a store-made pie, but it is so worth every ounce of effort. You get a truly delectable pumpkin pie that will convert even the most die-hard pumpkin cynics. I know because my mom is another pumpkin-pie hater, and after convincing her to try “just a sliver” last night, she went back for seconds and asked for some to go. 

So if you have a certain family member (mother, mother-in-law, crazy uncle?) you’re dying to impress without looking like you tried to hard, this is the dessert that will do it. Or if you’re just looking for the best damned pumpkin pie to stuff your own face with, look no further;)

What about you? Do you have any to-die-for pumpkin recipes? If so, please share with us in the comments section below! 

Happy Thanksgiving! 

 

This homemade no-bake, whipped pumpkin pie is made completely from scratch and uses real, fresh pumpkin instead of canned pumpkin pie filling. It's made with a ginger cookie crust and the pumpkin pie filling is mixed with whipped cream to make it light and fluffy. It puts all other pumpkin pies to shame!

No-Bake Whipped Pumpkin Pie (Made from Scratch with Real, Fresh Pumpkin)

Yield: one pie / 8 servings

Ingredients

For the Pie Filling

  • 2 cups puréed pumpkin (if using fresh pumpkin, you'll need 2 or 3 small to medium-sized sugar pumpkins)
  • 1 cup whipping cream, divided
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp each ground nutmeg, cloves, ginger, allspice and salt
  • 2 egg yolks, beaten
  • 1 packet of unflavoured gelatin
  • 1 Tbsp of olive oil (to brush over pumpkins when roasting)

For the Crust

  • 2 cups gingersnap cookie crumbs (roughly one package of store-bought cookies or a dozen homemade)
  • ½ cup melted butter

Instructions

  1. Preheat the over to 350ºF. Select 2 to 3 medium-sized sugar pumpkins and, using a large, sharp kitchen knife, remove the tops and then slice the pumpkins in half length-wise. Spoon out the pumpkin "guts."
  2. Brush a little olive oil over the flesh side of the pumpkin halves and then lay each half flesh-side down on a baking sheet. Bake at 350ºF for about an hour (or until flesh is soft and the consistency of mashed potatoes). Remove roasted pumpkins from the oven and allow to cool.
  3. While pumpkins are cooling, Use a blender or food processor to pulse your gingersnap cookies until you have 2 cups of cookie crumbs. Then mix cookie crumbs and melted butter together and press into a pie plate. There is no need to grease the pie plate as the butter in the pie crust will help it to not stick. Refrigerate pie crust. *If you would rather a traditional pie crust, this easy all-purpose pie crust is a great substitute. Just pre-bake it, allow it to cool and then pour your prepared pie filling in.
  4. While crust is setting in the refrigerator, begin making your pumpkin pie filling. First, scrape out all of the soft, roasted pumpkin flesh and discard the pumpkin skins (compost if possible). Next, put all of the flesh into a blender or food processor and purée until smooth. Measure out 2 cups of pumpkin purée for the pie.
  5. In a pot over medium heat, combine the pumpkin purée, gelatine, egg yolks, sugar, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, allspice, salt and ½ cup of whipping cream. Stir to mix well until all ingredients are evenly combined. Allow mixture to just come to a boil while stirring constantly. Then, remove from the heat and put in the refrigerator until the mixture sets.
  6. Beat the remaining ½ cup of whipping cream and then whip in about ¼ of the puréed pumpkin. Fold in the remaining puréed pumpkin until well combined.
  7. Spoon pumpkin pie filling into prepared crust and refrigerate until set (at least 3 or 4 hours. Overnight is best).
  8. Pie is ready to serve straight out of the fridge!

SaveSave


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

2 Comments

  1. Lynda Lu Gibb

    Thanks for sharing this recipe and the pie.. It truly is delicious!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      No problem! Glad you enjoyed it:)

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
You Might Also Like
How to Use a Rocket Mass Heater to Cook & Heat Off-Grid

How to Use a Rocket Mass Heater to Cook & Heat Off-Grid

* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   Learn how to heat and cook off-grid with a rocket mass heater, and why this is an even more energy-efficient solution than a traditional wood stove! This is a...

read more

My Favourite Things – 2022 Edition (aka. The Modern Homesteader’s Christmas Wish List)

My Favourite Things – 2022 Edition (aka. The Modern Homesteader’s Christmas Wish List)

* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   Every year around this time, I compile a list of my favourite things: Things that I love, use or covet for my own homestead, and things that I know other modern...

read more

If you haven't checked-in lately, the last week or so, we've sorta been in the trenches of homesteading and life over here. While some make it out to be glamorous all the time there are high's and low's just as there are in life. ⁣

With all that's going on, I've been making a point to find my way back into the garden, which is not only needed to feed my family, but also for some personal spiritual nourishment. ⁣

I just want to take a minute to love on my favorite veggie today, Broccoli! 🥦 It's one we plant over-and-over and I'm leaning into its abundance this year. ⁣

Not only is it one of my favorites, but we've also found it's one of the easiest veggies to grow so if you haven't tried it or added it to your garden yet, there's no better time than the present. ⁣

I've got an entire post on How to Grow Broccoli from Seed here: https://thehouseandhomestead.com/how-to-grow-broccoli-from-seed/ if you're looking for any tips or tricks.⁣

In my "How to" post you'll also find a link to one of my favorite recipes for Cream of Broccoli Leaf Soup!
...

31 5

Can I be honest?

Sometimes you've gotta take a step back and look at the life you've created for yourself and ask yourself "is this truly what I want?"

The other day I shared about losing two of our rabbits this week to Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease. The stress of losing them comes amidst a backdrop of heightened tensions around here...

From work pressures for Ryan to me trying to run a business and handle a very fussy, colicky 2-month-old (and a very busy 6-year-old), to things ramping up in the garden again and all of the other million things that need to get done (including multiple loads of laundry a day thanks to more spit up than I ever knew a baby was capable of producing), I finally felt like I was ready to crack this week.

Oh, not to mention we're doing this all on next to no sleep thanks again to our sweet boy.

I know this is all part of what we signed up for, but when it all happens at once, it can feel completely overwhelming. And when I'm completely overwhelmed and stressed out, that's exactly when I get sick too, which is exactly what happened a couple days ago.

Then yesterday (Saturday) I woke up feeling awful and decided to scroll Instagam as I nursed Noah. I saw other mothers with 6, 8 or even 10 kids somehow keeping it all together getting three square meals on the table every day while managing to keep a tidy kitchen and find time to Instagram about it.

I saw other homestead bloggers reaching new levels of success in their business that I can only dream about right now. And as I sat there in bed, covered in spit up with a ravenous baby nursing off me as I tried to console him, I felt sad for myself in that moment that I couldn't live up to the folks I was comparing myself to.

Later in the day I had to work, so Ryan took the kids to the beach and I stayed home. And I felt sad once again; Sad that I was missing out on yet another weekend with my family because I had created a life where I now have to work weekends just to keep up.

But the silver lining was that the work I had to do yesterday forced me out into the garden, and it was probably the most soothing thing I could have done for my soul.

(Continued in comments…)
...

86 23

Sometime homesteading looks like homegrown vegetables and freshly laid eggs and sourdough rising on the counter.

And sometimes it looks like tears when you have to bury one of your animals 😔

Ryan went out to feed the bunnies yesterday and Flopsy -our little black and white bunny- was laying dead in the pen. There was no blood, other than a little bit by her mouth. Seems like something internal happened. We’re not sure what.

Evelyn helped lay her to rest yesterday. It was a hard weekend for her. First she stayed with grandma and went with her to put her sick, 17-year-old cat down. Then she came home to the news that Flopsy was gone.

But I believe she’s more resilient because of it. We talked to her about how death is a part of all life, and allowed her to go through the stages of grief and process it however she felt she needed to.

Homesteading isn’t always sunshine and rainbows and snuggly barnyard animals. Homesteading teaches us hard lessons and helps us to become stronger and more resilient by challenging us daily.

Yesterday was a sad, hard day. But I’m glad we got to experience it together as a family.
...

72 9

A few years ago, Forbes published an article titled Dear Homesteaders, Self-Reliance is a Delusion.

Let’s unpack this…
What does self-reliant really mean? Is it actually achievable, or just a pipe dream?⁣

Over on the blog today I'm unpacking all of these thoughts, and the things I do know for sure as a homesteader, mother and member of a strong and self-reliant community. ⁣

But I really want to hear from you! Post in the comments below what self-reliance means in modern times, or what steps you're taking to be more self-reliant. ⁣

Read the full article here: https://thehouseandhomestead.com/what-is-self-reliance/ or at the link in my bio
...

53 6

The spring issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine is out now!

It’s that time again...

The time when things begin ramping up in the garden, the barnyard and the home.

From trays of seedlings to baskets full of eggs, spring is in the air and I don’t know about you, but I’m here for it!

It’s also time for a brand new issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, and boy do we have a good one for you…

In the spring issue, we cover a diverse range of topics from how to trade your skills for land to the realities of going off-grid, from seed-starting to what to do with too many eggs, and from the simple joys of a homemade herbal cocktail to the sometimes heavy emotional toll of raising meat animals.

In this issue, you’ll find:
🌱 What it really takes to live off-grid, with Tammy Trayer of Trayer Wilderness
🌱How you can trade your skills for a piece of land with the SKIP program from the folks at Permies.com
🌱 Everything you need to know about seed-starting to set your garden up for success and abundance!
🌱 What to do with too many eggs! Author Mimi Dvorak-Smith shares 800+ ways to use ‘em up when your hens start laying.
🌱 How to make your own healthier cocktails with homemade botanical syrups
🌱 Dealing with the emotional toll of raising meat animals on the homestead

Visit modernhomesteadingmagazine.com to login to the library and read the spring issue (current subscribers) or subscribe for just $19.99/year to read this issue and gain instant access to our entire library of past issues!

#modernhomesteading #homesteading #selfsufficiency #springonthehomestead
...

29 5

If you grow plants from seed (or if you want to), you’re likely going to want to start a few of them indoors. And if you start your seeds indoors, something that will make your life so much easier (and make your seedlings bigger, stronger and healthier) is an indoor growing stand with grow lights. ⁣

I've got a post I'm sharing with you today that will walk you through choosing the best type of lighting for whatever you're growing and then a step-by-step guide of how to make your grow stand, along with product recommendations if you want to make yours just like mine! ⁣

Ours can accommodate up to about 200 seedlings, but you can make yours as small or big as needed:)⁣

You can check out the post here https://thehouseandhomestead.com/how-to-build-indoor-growing-stand/ or at the link in my bio. ⁣

Let me know in the comments what you're growing new, or what you're most excited about in your planting journey this year!
...

25 1

Theme of the Month: ADIDAS ⁣
No, not the textiles brand, it stands for: 𝗔𝗹𝗹 𝗗𝗮𝘆 𝗜 𝗗𝗿𝗲𝗮𝗺 𝗔𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗦𝗲𝗲𝗱𝘀 because it's officially March and we are in full swing around here! ⁣

Before you just start throwing seeds in the ground or into red solo cups on your windowsill, it’s important to take some time to read your seed packets and get to know each crop’s specific needs.⁣

Understanding the information on a seed packet is super important when it comes to gardening, especially if you want your plants to get a strong, healthy start and produce an abundance of food for you. And what gardener doesn’t want that?!⁣

Set yourself up for success and take a minute to read through my 𝘏𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘰 𝘙𝘦𝘢𝘥 & 𝘜𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘚𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘗𝘢𝘤𝘬𝘦𝘵𝘴 𝘎𝘶𝘪𝘥𝘦, before your weekend gardening plans begin. ⁣

Grab the guide link in my bio, or get it here: https://thehouseandhomestead.com/how-to-read-seed-packets/⁣

Happy Planting:) ✨
...

26 3

This all-natural homemade toothpaste recipe is made with just four simple ingredients that are good for both your body and your bank account!⁣

I’m on a personal mission to replace every commercially-made, toxic product in our home with homemade, all-natural alternatives. One-by-one, I’m getting closer every day.⁣

The benefit of making all-natural toothpaste at home is avoiding the unhealthy additives found in most commercial toothpastes by substituting ingredients with proven benefits for oral health.⁣

So if you’re also on a mission to rid your own home of toxic products and replace them with healthy, all-natural versions that actually work, then I highly recommend whipping up a batch of this all-natural homemade toothpaste.⁣

Wishing you health, wealth and squeaky clean teeth… The all-natural way;)⁣

You can find the recipe here https://thehouseandhomestead.com/all-natural-homemade-toothpaste-recipe/ or at the link in my bio.
...

21 2

It's that time of year 🌱 seed starting season! ⁣

I know you can feel it too. The transition from winter to spring is truly a special time. It’s when life begins again. It’s the very first taste of all that lies ahead.⁣

So before you go just planting any and every seed you can get your hands on, I've got a list of 8 Things to Think About Before Starting Seeds, to get you off on the right food! ⁣

I will walk you through, planning, sowing, containers, watering, lighting and more, and if that's not enough you can download my Seed Starting Cheat Sheet at the end to lay it all out. ⁣

I hope you're as excited as I am for the beautiful Spring season that lies ahead:)⁣

You can find the list here https://thehouseandhomestead.com/before-starting-seeds/ or at the link in my bio.⁣

What are you planting this year? Anything new you've never tried before? Share with me in the comments!
...

25 5

Ever thought about growing mushrooms at home??

A great EASY way to get started is with one of these mushroom grow kits from @northsporemushrooms

All you need to do is cut open the pack, spray with a little water (the kits even come with a handy little spray bottle), and then sit back and watch the magic happen!

And seriously, watching mushrooms goes does feel a little like magic because they grow so fast you can practically see them growing, no time lapse necessary!

The mushrooms are ready for harvest in just a few days. No gardening experience or land necessary! Even a newbie homesteader in an apartment in the city can grow these babies!

This is a great way to dip your tow into the much bigger world of mushroom growing and harvesting, and to try out a few new varieties that you probably won’t find anywhere else.

I grew Pink Oyster Mushrooms, Lion’s Mane and Blue Oyster Mushrooms (all pictured here). I’ll be using the Pink Oyster Mushrooms in a rigatoni pasta for dinner tonight. I turned the Lion’s Mane into Lion’s Mane “crab cakes” and the Blue Oyster Mushrooms are delicious as part of a stir fry or sautéed in butter and spooned over sourdough toast.

If this reel intrigues you, you can grab your own mushroom grow kit (along with time of other mushroom related products, including fruiting blocks, outdoor log kits, medicinal tinctures, capsules and more) at northspore.com. Use code HOUSEANDHOMESTEAD for 10% off your order!

And if you haven’t yet, be sure to check out my interview with Louis Giller of North Spore Mushrooms in the winter issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine. You can also find my recipe for Lion’s Mane “Crab Cakes,” along with other delicious mushroom recipes and an in-depth feature on medicinal mushrooms including Lion’s Mane, Reishi, Chaga and Cordyceps in the winter issue.

Visit modernhomesteadingmagazine.com to subscribe or login to the library and read the current issue.

Mushrooms really are pure magic, don’t ya think? 🍄 ✨

#mushrooms #mushroomhead #shrooming #eatyourshrooms #mushroomsaremagic #modernhomesteading #urbanhomesteading #homegrown
...

65 16

If you’ve been following me for any length of time, it probably comes as no surprise that I don’t exactly love relying on the grocery store to provide for me and my family, and that sentiment is only getting stronger as time goes on.⁣

Between supply chain issues, rising food costs and the plethora of unhealthy ingredients, chemicals and GMO foods on grocery store shelves, I’d rather toil in the garden and kitchen all year to grow and preserve my own food than have to rely 100% on grocery stores to provide for me.⁣

But that being said, we are in no way 100% self-sufficient so when I do go to the grocery story, I haveI have some ingredient guidelines in mind that I use when shopping for my family. ⁣

Check out my shopping tips, what I do and don't buy, and where and who I like to buy from here at this link https://thehouseandhomestead.com/healthy-grocery-shopping-tips/ or at the link in my bio.
...

29 1

Usually by late February/early March, right about nowish, I’ve pretty much had enough of winter and the thought of enjoying a tropical fruit platter and a cold adult beverage on a sunny beach in *insert tropical vacation destination here* seems to be just about all I can think about...⁣

But with a newborn at home that's about the last thing on our to-do list right now! So this year, I will be visiting my tropical escape via my favorite Low-Sugar Mango Jam recipe. ⁣

If you do have tropical vacation plans, have a piña colada for me 🙏🏼, but if you don't then this recipe may be just what you need to "escape" for a few minutes into that tropical paradise:) 🥭🍹⁣

Check out the recipe here https://thehouseandhomestead.com/low-sugar-mango-jam-recipe/ or at the link in my bio. ⁣

Let me know how the recipe works for you, and if add in any additional fruits to change it up!
...

35 6

© The House & Homestead | All Rights Reserved | Legal

Skip to Recipe