How to Can Homemade Broth or Stock


Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbrothWe cook the vast majority of our meals at home, from scratch, and one of the ingredients we use most is stock (or broth… We’ll discuss the difference in a minute).

I probably use a quart or two of chicken stock every week on average— sometimes more if I’m making a big pot of soup. Chicken stock is super versatile and can be turned into soups, stews, and sauces, used as a braising liquid for meats or as a base for gravy, or even as an extra flavourful cooking liquid for grains like pasta and rice. (Risotto is a prime example of a grain that wouldn’t be nearly as good without stock or broth!)

Likewise, I like to keep beef broth on hand for beef stew, French Onion soup and beef short ribs. (I’m salivating as I write this).

While I don’t use vegetable stock a lot, it’s also a great vegan alternative to chicken stock!

 

What’s the difference between stock and broth?

Before we go any further, let’s talk about the difference between stock and broth…

The terms “broth” and “stock” are often used interchangeably, and so are the ingredients themselves. For example, if a recipe calls for stock but you only have broth, go ahead and use broth. Same goes for the opposite: you can use stock instead of broth if that’s what you have on hand. 

The real difference between stock and broth is that stock is typically made with the carcass or bones of an animal (ie. chicken or beef), that typically have little to no meat left on them. The bones are typically roasted to bring out more or the rich flavours of the bones and any bits of meat left on them.

Broth, however, can be made from bones or from meat, on or off the bone, and usually some veggies, herbs and seasonings for extra flavour. The meat/bones in broth are typically not roasted.

At the end of the day, they broth and stock are both very similar and can both be used interchangeably in most recipes.

* I use the terms “broth” and “stock” interchangeably throughout this articles as well.

I make my broth/stock with bones and carcasses with varying amounts of meat left on them, as well as veggie scraps, fresh and dried herbs, salt, and spices for lots of flavour.

 

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

Health benefits of broth and stock

Aside from flavour and versatility, broth and stock are both super healthy for you. There’s a reason why we’re told to eat chicken soup when we’re sick, and it’s all about the broth, baby!

Broth and stock are both loaded with the nutrients that are present in the ingredients used to make them, so if you add carrots, onions, garlic, herbs, etc. to your broth, you’ll benefit from all of the nutrients that are extracted from those ingredients.

Stock (aka. Bone Broth) is especially good for you, and has achieved superfood status in recent years due to its amazing health benefits. This is because stock/bone broth is made with bones, and animal bones contain all sorts of vitamins and minerals including calcium, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous (found in the bones themselves), glucosamine, chondroitin and collagen (found in the joints) and vitamins A and K2, zinc, iron, boron, manganese, selenium, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids (found in the marrow). [Source]

While all of these vitamins and minerals are important for our overall health, collagen in particular has been touted for its health benefits, and is the main nutrient responsible for the rise in popularity of bone broth.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body, and is essential for maintaining healthy skin, hair, nails, muscles, bones and joints.

Collagen supplements have been popping up in health food stores everywhere, but you can get collagen in its most natural (and delicious) form by enjoying it in some bone broth. Plus, you’ll get all of the nutrients from the addition of vegetables and herbs.

 

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

You can see the gel on this homemade beef broth. This is what it typically looks like after being refrigerated and is a sign of high levels of collagen.

 

Why make and can your own homemade stock?

While you can easily buy broth or stock at the store, there are a few reasons why you should make your own (and can it too!)

First of all, by making your own broth, you know exactly what’s in it and how much of each ingredient there is. Some popular commercial brands of broth contain additional ingredients like inflammatory canola and/or soybean oil, artificial flavours and flavour “enhancers,” and excessive amounts of sodium. By making your own, you can use healthier, all-natural ingredients and keep the salt to a healthy minimum.


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Second, making your own broth or stock at home is much cheaper than buying it from the store. This is especially true if you’re buying the good stuff (ya know, the organic brands without all of the added junk I listed above).

Good quality store-bought bone broth can be pretty pricey. Making your own is not only cheaper, it also makes use of animals parts that would otherwise be discarded.

I try to always buy whole or bone-in chicken, so we get a meal out of the meat and then I just toss the bones/carcass into the freezer until I’m ready to make a batch of broth. I also use veggie scraps instead of whole vegetables (which I’ll talk about in a minute), so my homemade chicken broth is practically free.

While I do purchase beef bones specifically for making broth, they’re still cheaper than it would cost to buy beef broth from the store.

And of course, if you raise your own meat animals, you’d be crazy NOT to make your own stock!

Finally, while you can make your own broth/stock and preserve any excess in the freezer, I prefer to can it so that I have it ready to go in liquid form whenever I need it. I’m just not great with planning ahead and remembering to take things out of the freezer well before I need them, so having canned stock ready to go is a huge help for me in the kitchen.

Just be aware that broth and stock are low acid and therefore MUST be pressure canned for safety reasons. Instructions on how to do this can be found in the recipe below.

* For more information on pressure canning, click here to learn how to use a pressure canner safely.

 

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

How to make broth or stock at home

Now that you know WHY you should be making your own bone broth/stock at home, here’s how to actually do it…

First of all, you’ll need to gather your ingredients. The recipe I use is very flexible and doesn’t use set amounts of anything. You can add as much or as little of the listed ingredients as you like.

The first thing you’ll need is bones or meat. 

If you’re making chicken stock, either start with one whole chicken carcass or a couple handfuls of bones. If using beef bones, I usually get two batches of stock out of roughly 5 lbs. of beef bones.

You can use “fresh” bones (ie. bones that you’ve just picked clean from a meal) or frozen bones. I like to toss all my chicken bones into the freezer in Ziplock bags until I’m ready to use them.

Next, roast the bones. This is a super important step that is crucial for beef broth and will improve the flavour of chicken broth too.

(One time I tried making beef broth without roasting the bones first and it was flavourless and gritty. I ended up tossing the whole batch. While roasting isn’t necessary for chicken stock, it improves the flavour and richness of your broth).

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

Preheat oven to 450ºF. Place bones on a baking tray (no need to thaw, you can do this while they’re still frozen), drizzle with a little olive oil and roast for about 30-40 minutes, until bones and any meat left on them have browned.

Transfer roasted bones to a large stockpot, slow cooker or Instant Pot (cooking instructions for each method follow).

Then, add a handful of chopped vegetables, herbs and spices for flavour. Onions, garlic, leeks, celery, carrots, rosemary, thyme, sage and bay leaves are all popular choices for adding flavour to stock, as well as some peppercorns and a generous pinch of salt.

You can use either fresh or dried herbs for flavour, just remember that dried herbs are more concentrated in flavour than fresh herbs, so use a bit less.

Add a splash of apple cider vinegar if you have some on hand. The ACV helps draw out more nutrients from the bones!

* Take caution if using sage as too much can make your stock taste bitter once canned.

** This recipe also works for vegetable stock too — just omit the bones/meat. **

 

Frugal kitchen tip…

I save a bunch of my veggie scraps in freezer bags for making stock, which makes this recipe extra frugal! I toss onion and garlic ends and peels, as well as (washed) carrot peels and celery ends in the freezer and then toss in a couple good handfuls with my bones when I’m ready to make stock!

 

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

Stovetop/slow cooker method

Cover bones, vegetables, herbs and seasonings with water, cover and bring to a simmer on the stovetop over medium heat, or set your slow cooker to low.

If cooking on the stovetop, reduce heat to low once simmering.

Cook on low for 8 to 12 hours (up to 24 hours).

Strain out the bones, veggies and other solid, reserving the liquid. You may need to strain the liquid twice and/or use a fine mesh sieve or cheesecloth to filter out any little bits.

Refrigerate bone broth before canning

 

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

Instant Pot method

If using an Instant Pot, cover bones, vegetables, herbs and seasonings with water (make sure not to fill past the max. fill line). Place the lid on and make sure the vent knob is closed. Set Instant Pot to high pressure and cook for two hours.

Once time is up, allow Instant Pot to depressurize naturally. Remove lid after about 30 minutes and strain, reserving the liquid.

Refrigerate bone broth before canning

Allow bone broth to cool in the pot or transfer to a container or divide between quart-sized Mason jars. Once cooled, place in the fridge and refrigerate overnight.

It’s important to refrigerate for at least 8-12 hours before canning as any fat will float to the top and harden so you can easily skim it off.

This is especially true for beef stock as this produces a thick layer of beef fat (tallow). For safety reasons, you shouldn’t can fat. Although it’s okay if there are a few tiny pieces of fat floating around still, so long as you remove the majority.

Once cooled in the fridge, remove stock and skim off the fat. At this point you will likely notice that the stock is thick and more like gelatine than liquid. This is a GOOD sign!! The thicker your stock, the more collagen it has. And don’t worry: once you heat it again or can it, it will turn back to liquid form.

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

You can clearly see the hardened fat on top of this refrigerated beef stock. This must be skimmed off before canning. Chicken stock typically has a much thinner layer of fat on top after refrigerating.

 

How to can homemade broth or stock

Prepare your pressure canner, jars and lids. For more information on how to do this, click here.

Transfer stock to a large, stainless steel pot and bring to a boil. Ladle boiling hot stock into prepared jars, leaving one inch headspace at the top.

Wipe jar rims to make sure there is no residue from the stock on the rims as this can prevent a good seal. I recommend using a paper towel or rag dipped in white vinegar as the vinegar will cut through the fat/oiliness of the stock and will ensure there’s no reside left behind.

Place new lids on jars and screw bands down to fingertip tight.

Process pint jars for 30 minutes and quart jars for 35 minutes at 10 lbs. of pressure (increase to 15 pounds of pressure if canning at over 1,000 feet above sea level).

  • You may come across other bone broth/stock canning recipes that say to process for 20 minutes for pint jars or 25 minutes for quart jars, however this is only safe if you’re using exact amounts of ingredients according to a safe and tested recipe. Since this recipe calls for a handful of this and a handful of that, increase your processing time to 30 minutes for pint jars and 35 minutes for quart jars. This is because the vegetables in this recipe require a longer processing time than meat, so I go by the processing time for vegetable stock rather than meat stock.

Once processing time is up, allow canner to depressurize completely, then remove lid and let jars rest in the canner for another 10 minutes before removing.

Remove jars from canner and let cool completely on a towel on your countertop before storing.

Canned stock should be stored in your pantry out of direct sunlight and should be used within a year (this is an overly cautious precaution for all home-canned foods, however I’ve used home-canned stock that was up to two years old and it’s been fine).

 

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

How to store homemade bone broth/stock in the fridge or freezer

If you don’t want to can your stock, it will last in the fridge up to one week.

Alternatively, you can freeze your homemade stock for up to a year (for best quality). If freezing, remember to leave ample headspace at the top of your jar(s) or container to allow for expansion. I like to leave at least two inches of headspace when freezing.

 

How to use homemade broth/stock

There are so many ways to use your homemade broth or stock. Use it as a base for soups and stews, sauces and gravies, as a basting liquid for braised meats or use in place of water when cooking grains like rice and pasta for added flavour.

You can also heat up a mug or a bowl and sip your homemade broth on its own to benefit from all of the nutrients. This is especially recommended when you’re feeling sick or like you’re coming down with something.

How do you use broth/stock at home?

As always, I’d love to know your favourite ways to use broth or stock at home. Do you have any favourite recipes or ways to use broth/stock that weren’t listed above? If so, let me know in the comments below!

Learning how to can homemade broth or stock at home can save you time and money. Plus, homemade broth is healthier and more flavourful! Learn how to make and can your own chicken, beef or vegetable broth and always have this versatile ingredient ready to go on your pantry shelves! #homemadebroth #howtocanbonebroth #howtocanbroth

How to Can Homemade Broth or Stock

Ingredients

  • Beef or poultry bones
  • Veggies/veggie scraps (onions, garlic, celery, carrots)
  • Fresh or dried herbs (rosemary, thyme, sage, bay leaves, peppercorns etc.)
  • Salt (a generous pinch)

Instructions

  1. Roast the bones/carcass in a 450 degree oven for 30-45 minutes for a richer, more flavourful broth.
  2. Add roasted bones to a stockpot, slow cooker or Instant Pot. Toss in whatever veggies or veggie peels you happen to have on hand. Onions, garlic, celery and carrots work well.
  3. Add a handful of fresh herbs or a spoonful of dried herbs such as rosemary, thyme, bay leaves and sage. * Take caution when using sage as too much can make your stock taste bitter.
  4. Add a generous pinch of salt and cover with water. Slow cook stock/broth on the stovetop or in a slow cooker for 8-12 hours (up to 24 hours(, or in the Instant Pot on high pressure for 2 hours.
  5. Strain out the solids and discard, reserving liquid. Once stock has cooled sufficiently, transfer it to the fridge and let cool until the fat on the top solidifies.

Pressure Canning Instructions

  1. Prepare canner, jars and lids.
  2. Remove stock from the fridge and use a spoon to scrape the fat off the top and discard. Add liquid stock to a stockpot and bring to a boil.
  3. Ladle hot stock into jars, leaving 1” headspace at the top. Wipe rim with a towel dipped in vinegar (the vinegar will help remove any fat that may prevent a seal on the top of the jar). Place lids on and screw bands on to fingertip tight.
  4. Place jars in pressure canner and process pint jars for 30 minutes and quart jars for 35 minutes at 10 lbs. of pressure (increase to 15 pounds of pressure if canning at over 1,000 feet above sea level).
  5. Once processing time is finished, turn off the heat and allow the pressure canner to depressurize completely, then remove weighted gauge and wait another 2 minutes. Remove lid and wait another 10 minutes before removing jars from canner. Let jars sit on a towel on your counter top for at least 12 hours before moving them to your pantry.

Notes

This is a very flexible recipe with no set amounts. As long as you pressure can it for 30 minutes (pints) or 35 minutes (quarts), you don't have to measure your vegetables out.


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

14 Comments

  1. Jimid

    I am about to pressure can beef and chicken broth-stock that slow cooked for 24 plus hours. I used carrots, celery, corn cobs, onions, parsley and garlic. This has been all strained and the fat removed. How long do I pressure can it at 10 pounds?
    This is separate batches of beef and chicken not combined.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Jimid,
      As per the recipe, “process pint jars for 30 minutes and quart jars for 35 minutes at 10 lbs. of pressure.”

      Reply
  2. Terri

    Hi. Love your tutorial! I canned chicken broth. I guess instead of stock as the carcass still had some meat on it as did the wings etc. I strained the broth thru a colander but after canning noticed itty bitty bits of maybe meat at bottom of jar. I pressure canned my pints 25 mins at 11 pounds. No one has addressed this yet. Is this now unsafe to eat. I canned 15 pints. Yikes. Thanks

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Terri,
      It’s totally okay if there are some bits of meat still in your broth. The only caveat would be if you added veggies to the broth, as veggies need 30 to 35 minutes of pressure canning in broth (30 minutes for pints and 35 minutes for quarts). But if it was straight chicken broth/stock, 25 minutes is just fine:)

      Reply
      • Terri

        Whew what a relief. Thanks. I was worried with the bits of meat it needed 75 mins of canning time. Thanks so much!

        Reply
  3. lorraine Rodrigue

    I love to make bone broth too. In the summer I put together many herb bouquets with the herbs in my garden and I tie them with kitchen string. Freeze in a double zip lock bag. In winter I can just grab one to throw in stock, stews and anything I want the flavor of herbs. By tying it up the herbs stay together in cooking and when done simmering the meal you can grab the whole bouquet for your compost container.

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      That is an awesome idea, Lorraine! I love it!
      I will have to try that next year as I have already dried or frozen my herbs separately by now.

      Reply
  4. Jennifer

    Hi do I have to take off all of the fat? I like having a bit of fat in my broth. But I’ve never tried canning it before

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Jennifer,

      If you’re canning it you should take off as much of the fat as possible. It’s not safe to can fat. That being said, if there are tiny bits of fat left and you’ve followed all of the other canning directions it will still be safe to eat. If you like having more fat than that I’d recommend freezing it rather than canning.

      Reply
  5. Kim

    This was the answer to my question. I made beef broth and when I checked on canning times I saw that the recipe only used a small amount of veggies so I wasn’t sure if I should increase my processing time to equal a veggie broth. Glad to know how to can it safely so I don’t have to just freeze it all. Thanks!

    Reply
  6. Johanna

    I read somewhere that adding salt to the bones can cause toxins to leak from the bones. So as a pre auction I add salt after I have strained the broth.

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      I have not heard that salt will do that when cooking bones. The only thing I have heard is to use caution when adding salt to anything you will be canning as it becomes more concentrated and can ruin your food, making it too salty.

      I personally, don’t add salt at all in most of my canning recipes so I have more control of the final product when cooking. I can always add salt when reheating or cooking while making the meal.

      Reply
  7. Keren Davis

    I like reading your emails and clicking onto some of the links which interest me. One thing that really bothers me is all of the pop ups which disrupts my reading. I know you need ads, but please minimize the pop ups which overtake the reading. It makes me bypass your blog when it gets too annoying (and I refuse to buy those products)

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Karen,
      I understand the frustration as I too get really annoyed when there are too many pop-ups on websites. I do have a couple pop-up options to sign up for my resource library or to follow me on social media, but otherwise I try to keep it to a minimum (I hate those pop-up video ads, for example). Thank you for understanding why they are necessary for me to run my business. And once you’ve visited my site once or twice, so long as you haven’t cleared your history on your computer, you shouldn’t see those pop-ups every time.

      Reply

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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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I’ve tried my hand at many skills and tackled my share of adventurous projects over the years. Along my homesteading and journey I’ve tried everything from candle-making to cheesemaking, sourdough bread to fermented vegetables, canning and dehydrating to rendering lard and more. When it comes to home medicine, I’ve learned how to make may useful concoctions, from herbal teas, tinctures and syrups to poultices, salves, ciders and more. But encapsulating my own placenta after the birth of our son was definitely a first, and by far my most adventurous “kitchen project” and foray into home medicine so far.

I have to admit, I was a bit squeamish at first, but I’m fascinated by this kind of stuff and love learning skills that allow me to take my health and well-being into my own hands. I also love challenging myself to try new things and pushing myself out of my comfort zone.

A few of the possible benefits of consuming placenta after birth include:

• Hormones in the placenta can improve mood and lessen symptoms of postpartum depression
• Can reduce postpartum bleeding
• Provides a natural source of iron and other micronutrients
• Can help boost milk production

And did you know, around 99% of mammals are know to consume their placenta after birth? Only humans and marine mammals do not typically consume their placenta.

But more and more humans are opting to consume their placentas after birth to reap the potential health benefits. The most popular way to do so is through encapsulation.

First the placenta is steamed, then it is sliced thin and dehydrated before being ground up into a fine powder. The you add that powder into some capsules using an encapsulator and you’re done!

I’ve been taking 2 capsules 4x/day for the past week. Any real results are yet to be seen but I didn’t want to pass up the only chance I’ll probably get to try my hand at this home medicine project! I mean, you just never know when this skill might come in handy;)

So tell me, what’s the most adventurous thing YOU’VE tried in the name of homesteading and/or natural health? Comment below and let me know!
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Since the weather is often cold, dark and gloomy, there aren’t as many fun, free things to do outdoors, so it’s easy to blow your budget on other things that will help you beat cabin fever like eating out, going to the movies and even going shopping just for something to do.⁣

But the flip side to this is that, once January hits, many people are motivated by the fresh start the new year brings and are ready to hunker down for a while and get their finances on track after the holidays. So in many ways that makes winter the perfect time of year to adopt some frugal habits. ⁣

Visit this link https://thehouseandhomestead.com/12-frugal-living-tips-for-winter/ or the link in my bio for the full list of Frugal Winter Living tips, and if you're already looking and planning towards Spring you'll also find more frugal living tips for every season linked at the bottom of the list!
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Our#homesteadpantrychallenge is in full-swing and now that our little one has arrived, simple and frugal pantry meals are a necessity to ensure we are getting adequate rest and not overdoing it during these newborn days. ⁣

When I'm staring at the pantry wondering what to make, I love referring back to this list for a little bit of inspiration for either bringing back an old recipe, or creating a new one. ⁣

𝗪𝗵𝗮𝘁'𝘀 𝗜𝗻𝗰𝗹𝘂𝗱𝗲𝗱: ⁣
Breakfasts⁣
Soups⁣
Homemade Breads⁣
Main Dishes⁣
Snacks & Sides⁣
Sweets & Treats⁣

So whether you’re trying to save a little extra money on your grocery bill, or prioritizing rest this season these 35 frugal recipes will help you get good, wholesome, delicious homemade food on the table every day, which means you have one less thing to stress about. ⁣

Check out the full list at https://thehouseandhomestead.com/frugal-recipes-roundup/ or visit the link in my bio. ⁣

Eat well friends:)
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I hope you had a wonderful and restful end of holidays, and are also feeling ready to get back on track with your daily schedule here in the new year. It can sometimes feel like a lot to get going, but those "regular days" help us to regulate our rhythms, and in turn help us slowly, gear up for the Spring season ahead. ⁣

In our Winter Issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, my friend and fellow homesteader, Ashley Constance of @alittleselfreliant wrote "Breaking Your Cabin Fever" a list of ideas for staying productive over the winter months. ⁣

If you're feeling a bit restless and up to it, this list of ideas is a perfect way to get back into a daily routine. ⁣

From making and creating, to preparing, planning and organizing you'll be feeling ready for Spring in no time. ⁣

To see the full list, subscribe to Modern Homesteading Magazine here at https://modernhomesteadingmagazine.com/subscribe/ or visit the link in my bio.
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