Homemade Soy Candles with Essential Oils


* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.

 

These homemade soy candles with essential oils are a safe, healthy and all-natural alternative to store-bought candles. And they make a great homemade gift! #homemadesoycandles #soywaxcandles #soywax #homemadecandleswithessentialoils #diycandles These homemade soy candles with essential oils are a safe, healthy and all-natural alternative to store-bought candles. And they make a great homemade gift for Christmas or any other occasion!

***

I started making my own candles 3 years ago at Christmas when we couldn’t afford to buy gifts for everyone in our family.

I’d wanted to try candle-making for a while, but hadn’t wanted to spend the money on the supplies I needed to get started. But the fact that it was Christmas and I had to spend money on gifts anyway gave me an excuse to finally invest in some candle-making supplies for a fraction of the cost of individual store-bought gifts for everyone on our list.

I decided on soy wax for a few different reasons. First of all, I wanted a natural wax that burned clean and was safe and healthy for my family. This meant paraffin wax was not an option as paraffin is an oil derivative and has been shown to release toxic carcinogens into the air when burned. So my options were pretty much to either use beeswax or soy wax.

While I do love beeswax, I wanted a white candle that I could add fragrance to, similar to the ones you might find at the store. So I settled on soy wax and I’m still using it to this day.

 

 

Never buy candles from the store again

The first time I lit one of my homemade candles, I was hooked. I honestly don’t think I’ve ever bought a candle from the store since that day. I quickly started buying larger quantities of wax and making more and more candles. 

These homemade soy candles with essential oils are a safe, healthy and all-natural alternative to store-bought candles. And they make a great homemade gift! #homemadesoycandles #soywaxcandles #soywax #homemadecandleswithessentialoils #diycandles

I realized that buying in bulk was the best way to go because it ended up costing less per candle by purchasing large, 50-lb. boxes of wax. Now I always have a box of wax at home ready to go for whenever I need to whip up a few quick homemade gifts or replace some of the candles from my own collection.

I usually make my candles in repurposed old Mason jars, which I usually get from the local Thrift store for pennies. I also save money on wicks by purchasing lengths of wicking, measuring them out and placing the tabs on the wicks myself, but if you’re just getting started I would recommend just going with the ready-made wicks. They’re pretty affordable as is and make life a lot easier when you’re just starting out.

As for other supplies, I use a 4-lb. pouring pot, a kitchen scale and a meat thermometer, as well as  a wooden dowel I bought from the dollar store which has become my designated stir stick for mixing the wax. I always wipe it down with a paper towel while the wax is still hot so that it stays nice and clean. Same goes for the pouring pot.

The most costly part of making these candles is the money spent on essential oils, however I’ve found an amazing company that sells super affordable high-quality essential oils, so all in it only costs me an average of a couple dollars per candle, which is a sliver of the price of similar store-bought candles. Not to mention, using essential oils in candles is a much healthier alternative to the synthetic fragrance oils that are added to most store-bought scented candles.

 

Fragrance oils vs. essential oils

When I first began making candles at home I did use fragrance oils to scent them. I wanted to mimic the scented candles I used to buy frequently from boutique stores and a from a certain chain of soap and candle stores that resides in malls across North America. 

But it didn’t take me long to realize that, as lovely as these fragrance oils make candles smell, they’re anything but natural and they also emit toxic carcinogens into the air when burned. So I started looking for healthier alternatives.

Essential oils were the clear choice as they are 100% pure and natural and they smell amazing! So I began using essential oils in place of fragrance oils in my candles.

These homemade soy candles with essential oils are a safe, healthy and all-natural alternative to store-bought candles. And they make a great homemade gift! #homemadesoycandles #soywaxcandles #soywax #homemadecandleswithessentialoils #diycandles

The only problem with essential oils is that the scent from essential oils doesn’t “throw” well when burned in candle form, so you have to use a lot of essential oils in order to produce any scent at all.  And even then, you don’t get anywhere near the same intensity of fragrance that you get from synthetic fragrance oils.

But essential oils are like, a thousand times safer and healthier than candles scented with fragrance oils.

(Okay, I don’t have the exact stats in front of me. But you get the gist.)

I will admit though, that I do love scented candles (those spicy, warm apple pie, pumpkin spice and fresh evergreen ones that come out around the holidays are some of my faves!) and so I do still scent some of my candles with a little fragrance oil mixed with essential oils. Not all of them (I aim for the 80/20 rule), but I have fragrance oils left over from a couple years ago, so I used some in my latest batch.

I also mix fragrance oils with essential oils in the candles that I sell (I’ve sold at craft fairs and I’m selling some at a pop-up Christmas shop this season), because I know people are looking for delicious-smelling scented candles (plus I can’t afford to be putting hundreds of drop of essential oils in each batch I sell or I’d never make any money!) But I now also mix with essential oils, which I find actually enhances the smell of the essential oils so I’m able to use less fragrance oils and essential oils than I used to.

If you choose to mix fragrance oils and essential oils to get a nicely scented candle, I’ve found I like 2 ounces of fragrance oil for every pound of wax, and about 20 drops of essential oils mixed in. 

You could, of course, forgo both the fragrance and the essential oils altogether if you wanted and still get that warm, cozy glow:)


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Say no to dyes

One more thing to consider is the dyes that are used in commercially-produced candles. Coloured candles typically use synthetic dyes, and surprise surprise! These dyes also contain toxic carcinogens! 

I used dyes in my own candles once when I wanted to make some different coloured candles for the holidays. But after learning about the dangers lurking in these synthetic dyes, I decided never to use them again. 

Plus, I really love classic white candles, don’t you? They look much cleaner and classier than coloured candles in my opinion.

 

Supply list for making soy candles with essential oils

While I could go on all day about the reasons why you should make your own all-natural soy candles with essential oils and no dyes, I’m sure that if you’re here, what you really want is to know how to make them. So let’s get on with it…

These homemade soy candles with essential oils are a safe, healthy and all-natural alternative to store-bought candles. And they make a great homemade gift! #homemadesoycandles #soywaxcandles #soywax #homemadecandleswithessentialoils #diycandles

First, you’re gonna need a few supplies. I’ve linked to the products and brands I personally use and/or recommend for starting out:

  • Soy wax (flakes or pellets) 
  • Essential oils (I use and recommend Plant Therapy)
  • Wicks (either pre-made or cotton wicking by the length plus wick tabs to make your own) 
  • Wick holders (store-bought or using items from home such as clothespins)
  • Jars (Mason jars work great!)
  • Glue gun (for sticking wicks to jars)
  • Pouring pot plus sauce pan to use as double boiler
  • Digital kitchen scale
  • Wooden spoon or dowel for mixing
  • Kitchen thermometer
  • Fragrance oils (I almost feel guilty including these here since I preach all-natural everything all the time. But hey, ya gotta live a little too. And if you’re like me and LOVE scented candles fragrance oils, you may as well make your own. At least this way you can add beneficial essential oils, omit dyes, know that your wax is all-natural and control the amount of fragrance oil you add).
  • Labels (these are optional, but they help you to remember which oils are in which candles and they look great for gifting). 

 

*** I’ve got some free printable labels for soy candles available under the “Labels” section of my Free Resource Library

You can also grab a copy of my FREE Guide to Candle-Making with Soy Wax & Essential Oils from the “Homesteading & Self-Sufficiency” section of the resource library. Sign up to gain access and download your freebie so you’ll have everything you need to make soy candles at your fingertips! 

 

How to Make Soy Candles With Essential Oils

1. Prepare your jars.

If repurposing old jars, make sure they’re clean and dry.

2. Measure out your wax.

I recommend weighing wax with a digital kitchen scale.Tare the pouring pot first (tare just means hit the “tare” or “weight reset” button with your empty pot on the scale so that the scale doesn’t count the weight of the pot itself). Reset the scale to 0, then fill with wax until you’ve reached your desired weight.

*Note: Even though I use a 4-pound pot, I usually make my candles in two-pound batches so I can do a wider variety of scents. Two pounds of wax will fill approximately four or five 8-oz Mason jars (jam jars or half-pints) or 8 to10 4-oz jelly jars. 

3. Melt wax in pouring pot or double boiler on the stove.

Never heat up a pouring pot directly on the stove top. Always fill another pot with about an inch or two of water and place pouring pot in the pot. Melt wax on high until wax has completely liquified. Use a kitchen thermometer to check the temperature of the wax. For best results, allow it to reach 180ºF and then take it off the heat and allow it to cool a bit before adding your essential oils.

4. While wax is cooling, prepare your wicks.

Centre and glue wicks to the inside bottom of jars using a glue gun. Place wick holders (or clothespins) across the tops of jars to keep wicks upright and centred.

5. Allow wax to cool to roughly 130ºF.

Once cooled, add your essential oils. You’ll want to add about 100 drops of essential oils for every pound of wax. Yes, you read that right. I told you you need to use a lot! Mix in essential oils using a wooden spoon or mixing tool. (If you’re adding fragrance oils, now is the time to add those in too).

6. Pour wax slowly into prepared jars.

Allow to cool completely before moving the jars (sort of like leaving the jars to cool on the countertop after canning). Trim wicks to desired length, put custom labels on your jars and voilà! C’est fini! 

These homemade soy candles with essential oils are a safe, healthy and all-natural alternative to store-bought candles. And they make a great homemade gift! #homemadesoycandles #soywaxcandles #soywax #homemadecandleswithessentialoils #diycandles

Enjoy your candles, whether you’re giving them away or burning them yourself at home:)

 

Essential Oil Combinations for Soy Wax Candles

Candle-making is by-and-large an exact science. The creativity lies in coming up with different essential oil combinations to use in your homemade candles. 

The following are some of my favourite essential oil combinations that I use in my own homemade candles. Feel free to follow these recipes or create your own combinations!

 

1. Lemon & Lavender

I like blending 3 parts lavender and one part lemon, so 75 drops of lavender and 25 drops of lemon. But you could do it the other way around if you’d like a more “lemony” scented candle. I also like to add bergamot and/or vetiver essential oil to this combo.

 

2. Orange & Cinnamon

I usually mix equal parts orange and cinnamon bark essential oils, but I also like to add clove, nutmeg or ginger to this combo for a warm, “holiday” scented candle. 

 

3. Rosemary & Cedarwood

This is a new favourite of mine. I really like the combo of rosemary and spruce or fir needle as I find it woodsy and manly. But I’ve recently discovered cedarwood essential oil and it’s one of my new all-time favourites. You can also mix a combination or rosemary, cedar wood and spruce or fir. These are all earthy, woodsy scents and they make a great combo if you’re looking for a more rugged, “manly” candle.

I’ve also started playing around with adding vanilla to my candles. Plant Therapy sells vanilla essential oil, which is what I use in mine. But it’s more like vanilla extract, so it doesn’t blend quite the same way.

You need to make sure it’s really well blended into your wax before pouring so it doesn’t “gather” at the bottom of your candle. But the vanilla does make the candles smell amazing. You could even try this with plain old vanilla extract that you have in your kitchen!


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Of course, the possibilities are endless when it comes to essential oil combinations, so feel free to play around with different scents. If you’re not sure how certain oils will smell together, open the bottle of the oils you’re thinking of using a hold them all together and smell them in the bottles together. 

And of course, if you come up with some unique and delicious scent combinations, this homestead mama wants to know about them! Comment below, share on Instagram and tag me @thehouseandhomestead or post your recipes and any photos of your candles to our Facebook page!

P.S. Don’t forget to grab your printable labels and a copy of the Complete Guide to Candle-Making from my Free Resource Library!

I’ve included more in-depth information on candle-making as well as a trouble-shooting guide for common problems and printable labels to use on your own homemade candles. 

 

Wishing you homemade, homegrown, homestead happiness 🙂

 

 

 


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54 Comments

  1. Linda Daher

    I am very new to cancel making , could you tell me why my candles burn unevenly . They only melt in a circle around the wick , leaving behind a ring of soy around .
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Linda,

      It could be that the wicks you’re using are too small for the size of the candle you’re making. You might want to opt for thicker wicks. Anna lists all of the candle-making products she uses here on this page. You can also download a free copy of Anna’s Complete Guide to Candle Making guide from our Free Resource Library. The guide includes s a troubleshooting section that you might find helpful, as well as printable labels and other useful information.

      Reply
  2. Jan hoffmeyer

    love this great information…just started making soy candles and am a big believer of essentials oils but I discovered Candle Science CLEAN fragrances and they have no carcinogenic phthalates…..would you consider them? I am trying to save some money on selling my soy candles? thank you jan

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Jan,
      I haven’t heard of that brand of fragrances so I have not tried them. But if they are indeed “clean” and without carcinogenic ingredients, then it sounds like a good option.
      Let us know what you think of them as I am sure we are all trying to save a few dollars here and there. 🙂

      Reply
  3. kathy

    Hi there, thank you so much for this incredible article, I am so excited to try this out on my own. Quick question though – I see how you explain how much essential oils to use, but I have not read how much fragrance oil you do use when you add it to your mixture. I went to the link you provided in one of your responses and I found their natural fragrance oil and am excited to try it out., but not sure how much you use.

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Kathy,
      In the post, Anna says that if you choose to mix fragrance oils and essential oils to get a nicely scented candle, she likes to use 2 ounces of fragrance oil for every pound of wax, and about 20 drops of essential oils mixed in.
      If you were to use only fragrance oil I would start with the 2 oz per pound of wax and adjust to your desired fragrance strength.
      I hope this helps. 🙂

      Reply
  4. drew

    Great guide here and looking forward to my next candle-making attempt! Quick question, though… When you say to add ~100 drops essential oil or ~2oz fragrance oil per pound of soy wax, is that per pound of solid wax or per pound of melted wax?

    Thanks for clarifying!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      I weigh my wax out in solid form, then melt it. It will still be the same weight once melted. So base the amount of oils/fragrance on the weight you get when you measure it out in solid form. I hope that makes sense!

      Reply
  5. Trish Geisler

    Thank you for the information. I am Trish and I live in Adelaide South Australia. In “the land down under”.
    I have just started making my own candles, and am well and truly hooked.!~!!!
    I love mixing my own scents to make a unique blend. A little bit of this , and a little bit of that, voila. Beautiful. I write down what I have done so I can repeat the recipe if necessary, ( or though I do rather like mixing the oils up a bit) .and I also give them a name eg. ” Woodland Caper “, “Sea Shanty” etc. Great fun and very very relaxing, then I get to light them and enjoy the newly created scent. Thank you again, it was very pleasant and enjoyable reading all the comments. Happy candle making and take care, Warm Regards, From Trish (Adelaide South Australia)

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Trish! Thanks for the comment! I used to live in Australia and remember making my way through Adelaide. Beautiful!
      I also love playing around with different scents. I do find I need to use a bit of fragrance oil to get the essential oils to really throw. I’m currently on the hunt for natural fragrances made from botanicals (rather than synthetic). We’re coming up on candle-making season here in Canada as we head into fall and winter. Take care and happy candle-making to you too!

      Reply
  6. Nikki

    Thanks for this information. I just started making candles. I have a question about essential oils, how do you measure how much oil to put if you will be using 3 or more essential oil ? Likewise with mixing fragrance oil and essential oils?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Nikki,
      When adding more than 2 essential oils, just divide that number by 100 (the number of drops needed per pound of wax). But it really is up to you. So- if using 3 oils – that is basically 33 drops each if you want an even distribution of each scent… or you could use 50 drops of one and accent with 25 of each of the other two. The combinations are endless and this is where your creativity comes in to make it your own blend.
      As for mixing fragrance oil and essential oils together, Anna recommends to use 2 ounces of the fragrance oil with 20 drops essential oil per pound of wax. Mixing any different oils within those guidelines is up to you.

      Reply
  7. Josie Concannon

    Hi,

    Thank you soo much for providing this information. I did my first lot of candles the other day and could not understand why they didn’t smell of anything. Now i know why as i only put about 10 drops of essential oils in!

    Thank you! 🙂

    Reply
  8. Rachel Stevenson

    I make my own ‘essential oil’ by warming 1 cup of my favorite carrier oil (my current favorite cheapest is Costco Avacado Oil) in a small crock pot. I add whatever spices I want: coffee grounds, Orange Peel, Vanilla Pods, Fir Needles from my small living christmas tree, nutmeg, you name it. I bring it to just under a boil and turn it down to simmer an hour or two. I then store in a glass container, I currently use my husbands old wine bottles. My family says my candles smell like cookies!
    I also get dried twigs from a tree outside and light my candles with those. It is cheap and gives it a fun rustic look!:)

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Really!? And they actually throw scent? I’m gonna have to try this!

      Reply
  9. Suzanne Martin

    Hi Anna,
    I noticed you said you buy soy wax in 50# bags. Would you be able to send me a link to where I can purchase in bulk? Thanks so much for the great tutorial!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Suzanne,

      It looks like the wax that I normally use is currently unavailable on Amazon, but this one is rated as the number 1 best seller and is comparable to the brand I use, AND it comes in a 50-lb. box:) Here’s the link: https://amzn.to/2YgKdRS

      Reply
  10. Cindy

    Is there another soy wax that you recommend? The link is a discontinued product. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Cindy,

      Thanks for letting me know! For wax, most any pure soy wax will do. But I’ve also used CandleScience soy wax and like their products.

      Reply
  11. Sarah B

    A great resource, thank you for posting as I really want to try my hand at making my own candles. I tried at sign up for access to your resource library but I haven’t been sent a confirmation email yet and I’ve now tried 3 times in the last 5 days.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Sarah! Sorry to hear you’re having trouble accessing the resource library. I will email you directly with details as it looks like you signed up a while ago, which is why you’re not getting a confirmation email now. Please check your inbox for an email from me with instructions:)

      Reply
  12. Mumtaz

    This was very helpful Anna, thank you for this piece. I tried making beeswax candles with essential oils which was not only costly but really quite difficult and the smell was not amazing as beeswax doesn’t work that well with essential oils plus finding the right wick was so difficult. Hopefully I might try with soy wax see if that fares any better.

    Reply
  13. Samantha Sunshine

    Hello
    I was wondering what the absolute max is of essential oil that I can add? For a strong smelling candle? Is it dangerous to add more than a teaspoon per pound of wax? What would happen?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Samantha,
      I don’t know that there’s a maximum as far as safety is concerned. It’s just that it starts to get very expensive the more essential oils you add and the scent doesn’t become much more potent. I’ve tried up to about 125 to 150 drops but I didn’t notice a huge difference adding the extra 25 to 50 drops so I’d rather conserve my oils:)

      Reply
    • Tina Griffin

      I have wasted so much money trying to get my Candles to smell. I use 444 soy wax and I’ve spent tons on variety of essential and fragrance oils. The wax burns beautifully, but no scent. I’ve tried every melting temp from 185-130. Added oil at temps from 180-120. I’ve tried making 1 single candle to making 3 8 ounce which averages out to 1 pound of melted wax to 1ounce of oil. I either get a perfectly burning candle with no scent or a candle that catches fire if I add more oil for stronger scent throw. I don’t know what else to do??‍♀️??

      Reply
      • Anna Sakawsky

        Hi Tina,

        That’s strange that you can’t get them to smell… I could see if you were only using essential oils, the scent just doesn’t throw well with essential oils so they’re very mild. However, I’ve never had a problem when using fragrance oils. Are you using fragrance oils that are specifically meant for candles and cosmetics? I use fragrance oils from a company called Voyageur Soap & Candle Co. Here’s their website if you’d like to check them out: https://www.voyageursoapandcandle.com/

        Reply
  14. Aileen

    I’m just getting into candle making and this was so helpful, thanks so much for all the tips.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      My pleasure:)

      Reply
      • Danielle

        Thanks for this! What kinds of ratios do you use when mixing fragrance and essential oils? Are certain fragrances more popular or better for starting out?

        Reply
        • Tish Painter

          Well, Anna recommends using 100 drops of essential oils per pound of wax. So, if you want to blend your own scents, then I would recommend thinking about which scent you want to stand out a little more and do a 60/40 ratio– or you may want to divide them equally for a balanced scent combination. I would start with a 1/2 pound of wax and 50 drops of your favorite scents for starters, or follow her blends listed and maybe you will find your favorite there? The ones she has listed are her most popular ones so far.
          Enjoy!

          Reply
          • Kayla Rhode

            Hi, this really did help. I just have some questions! I started making soy candles. I’m struggling on getting a strong scent. I have 8 oz jars and 4 oz. I make each at a time. Verses a big batch. What would you suggest on how much essential oil to use per 8 oz and 4 oz to get the best results?

          • Tish Painter

            Well, if you use only 8 oz of wax (1/2 pound) to make 2 small (4 oz) candles or one larger candle, then I suggest starting with 50 drops of essential oil. That would be the best place to start based on Anna’s recipe. Scents can be a very personal thing and everyone has their own perception of what is a strong smell. If this is not enough, then you can increase the drops until you have the strength you desire.
            If you only want one small candle using 1/4 pound (4 oz) of wax then perhaps start at 25 drops and work up (or down) from there. These are just some guidelines to start and then you can proceed with what appeals most to you and then you will have your own personal recipe for your needs.
            Good luck with your small batches of candles!

  15. Gigi

    Hi! I’d using fragrance oils, how much would you use per lb?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      I would stick with no more than 2 oz. of fragrance oils per pound of soy wax. Some sources recommend 1 oz. per pound, but I like mine scented a little stronger. Any more than that and you risk having “oily” candles as the ratio of fragrance oil to soy wax can be too high. But feel free to experiment! I have added up to 4 oz of fragrance oils per pound before. But I did find the tops a bit oily once cooled.

      Reply
  16. Kelly

    How did you attach the labels!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Kelly,

      I use these sticky Kraft paper labels for mine, but you can also use paper and glue: https://amzn.to/2XStO76

      Reply
  17. Tammy Hutchins

    I’m just starting to research this topic. I want pretty colored candles but understand not using the dyes. I am wondering about the powdered food coloring they use in macaroons or even freeze dried berry powder. Would that work? Yes, I’m more of a baker but dip my hands in many crafts. Just looking for alternatives. This isn’t necessarily the brand I would use but an example with more information than the one I would use. https://www.amazon.com/Americolor-Powder-Food-Color-Black/dp/B006ZCPFPW

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Tammy,

      I don’t have experience working with powders like that so I can’t say for sure how they would turn out but it’s definitely worth a try!

      Reply
      • Aychelel

        Hi! Would lemongrass essential oil and vanilla essential oil work together? Trying to decide what to buy. Thanks!

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          I don’t see why not! You never know until you try:)

          Reply
  18. Jacqueline Roth

    I was wondering how many tsp/TBL spoons 100 drops of essential oil would be. Thank You

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Jacqueline!

      While I’ve never measured it out myself, from the research I’ve done, 100 drops of essential oils equals approximately one teaspoon.

      Reply
  19. Melissa

    I was wondering if you could tell me where you get your fragrance oils at..like a link if possible..also I’m just getting into this and was wondering since u sell ur candles what do you charge ?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Melissa,

      I actually get my fragrance oils from a local company close to where I live here in BC. It’s called Voyageur Soap & Candle Co. So I’m not sure where all they ship to, but here is the link: https://www.voyageursoapandcandle.com/

      As for what I charge, I had some candles for sale at a Christmas pop-up shop this past year and she had them on sale for $18. I got 60% of that, so $12. I think $18 was a bit high. I might have gone $16 for the 8oz candles and $10 for the 4oz if it were just me. I’m also in Canada if that matters! Hope that helps:)

      Reply
      • JackieT

        Just made these candles for the first time! It was fun and relaxing! Something to keep you zen during these difficult times. A little comforting light and soothing smell. I used Frasier Fir essential oil. ??

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          Yes! I love getting into little projects like this in stressful times. It really helps to refocus attention on something calming and productive at the same time.

          Reply
  20. Melia

    This was a great tutorial, thank you!! I was wondering, though, is it possible to add the oil individually to each jar if you want to do different scents? Some friends and I want to try this, but we all have different scent preferences.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Melia,

      Yes you could probably add the individual oils to each candle and maybe just gently stir them in with a toothpick. Just be careful not to stir them too quickly as this can cause the wax to splash up on the jar and can introduce air bubbles which might affect how smooth your finished candle is. And of course you’ll want to add a lot less. I would probably add maybe 20 to 25 drops of essential oils per 8oz candle. The alternative would be to make one batch of candles with specific oils and pour one for everyone and then do another batch, etc. so that each person has one of each different scent to take home. I hope this helps! Let me know how they turn out:)

      Reply
        • Tish Painter

          The link to Anna’s Free Resource Library is at the end of the article, highlighted in red.
          Follow the instructions and then you will get an email with the password to access the information in the library.
          Enjoy!

          Reply
    • Shona

      I am extremely new this and with all the research I have done I definitely want to go for the natural candles to make where could I connect with you more.

      Also was wondering if there are any more essential oils mixes you could recommend for my first collection please

      Reply
      • Anna Sakawsky

        Hi Shona,

        If you sign up for my Free Resource Library, there is a printable candle-making guide under the “Homesteading & Self-Sufficiency Resources” section that walks you through the candle-making process and has a bunch of recipes for essential oil combinations. It’s also got lots of great troubleshooting tricks and tips. PLUS, if you sign up for the Free Resource Library, you’ll get on my email list and will get to connect with me every week when I send out new content! (You can also reply to my emails and chat me anytime:) Heres the link to sign up: https://thehouseandhomestead.com/resource-library/

        Reply
  21. Asha shah

    Useful tutorial ,was searching.
    Thanks

    Reply
  22. Robyn

    A great tutorial! Can’t wait to try making them.

    Reply

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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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What to Stock In A Home Apothecary

What to Stock In A Home Apothecary

* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   Having a home apothecary full of medicinal herbs, tinctures and infusions of all kinds is many a homesteader’s dream! In fact, as far as goals and dreams...

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What does it really mean to be self-reliant?

What does it really mean to be self-reliant?

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about what it really means to be “self-reliant.”  We talk a lot about self-reliance (or self-sufficiency) in the homesteading community, and outwardly it may seem as if the goal of “achieving” self-reliance is what ultimately...

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40 years on this Earth.
11 years together.
8 years married.
6 babies, one living, 4 in heaven and one more hopefully on the way.
20 fur (and feather) babies in our time together.
5 homes (plus a couple tents).
6 countries.
About 5,000 pounds of homegrown tomatoes, among other things;)
Too many good times to count.
Enough hardships to shape our characters.
One beautiful life together.

To my smart, talented, strong, kind, selfless, handsome amazing husband… The day I met you everything changed for the better. Sure, we’ve weathered some storms, but knowing I always have you to turn to has helped me through my darkest hours. The laughs, deep conversations, goals, dreams and unconditional love we share make each day worth living. And the family, home and life we’ve created together are more than I could have ever hoped for.

Happy 40th birthday to my one and only @thehumblehandyman. I can’t imagine doing life with anyone else. ❤️
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And then there were 3 😔

Despite fending off an eagle attack the other day, a sneaky raccoon got into the chicken run early this morning and took out one of our girls.

Having animals die is definitely the hardest part of homesteading, but it’s a reality of this lifestyle that everyone must come to terms with sooner or later.

While we care for our chickens and want to give them the best life possible while they’re here, we understand that they’re livestock, not pets, and that we’re not the only creatures who see them as a food source.

Luckily we have a new flock of up-and-comers who will be ready to lay in a few months. Until then, egg production around here is gonna be pretty scarce.
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So this is 35…

I decided to read my horoscope today (since it’s my birthday and all). I don’t really buy into the horoscope predictions, but I do think there’s something to be said for the personality traits we’re born with when the stars are aligned just so. Here are a few snippets that I found to be almost eerily on point:

“Tauruses born on May 18 are characterized by love of freedom and independence…They possess extraordinary creative energy, and they are never without an important cause to champion. They enjoy taking risks, but only when they believe the risk really matters.

As a rule, most decided early in life what they wanted to do and are not likely to deviate from that path. Their independent spirit makes them ideally suited to careers where they are their own boss, or are at least autonomous within a larger structure.

May 18 people want to make it on their own. No matter how successful they become, they never forget their roots and may even draw upon them for inspiration.”

Every year on my birthday I reflect on where I’m at, where I’m headed and where I’ve come from, and all I can say is that each year I’m only more grateful to be living life on my own terms, doing what I love most next to the people I love more than anything else in the world.

I’ll never forget where I came from and I’ll never have any regrets, because I wouldn’t be right where I am now without all of the experiences -good, bad or otherwise- that I’ve had along the way.

I knew when I was a little girl that I wanted to be a writer and a content creator. Homesteading came a little later in life, but when I knew, I knew.

I hope to be doing what I love and sharing it with you all for the next 35 years too! (Well, actually, if I’m being honest, I’d like to retire and throw my phone in the river long before that;) But until that day comes, thanks for being here to celebrate life with me today and every day. Cheers to another turn around the sun 🍻
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My daughter stayed overnight at her grandma’s last night, and this morning when I talked to my mom she said “Evelyn told me she’s never been to the doctor before.”

Proudly, I replied “no, she hasn’t, because she’s never needed to.” This is thanks in large part to the fact that we keep a well stocked natural medicine cabinet at home and do our best to treat everyday illnesses and ailments ourselves.

Having a well-stocked home apothecary (and the know-how to use herbal and natural medicine at home) is yet another important piece of the self-sufficiency puzzle, and one that we’re working on a lot right now, both in our home and in my membership program, the Society of Self-Reliance.

If herbal medicine and building a home apothecary is on your to-do list as well, I’ve got some great tips and a printable checklist of items you’ll want to start stocking up on now so you’re prepared to make all sorts of medicinal preparations in time for cold and flu season later this year.

This is also a great time to plant certain medicinal herbs so that you’ve got a personal, sustainable supply of herbal medicine at home, because who knows what supply chain issues are gonna hit next!

To help make building and stocking your home apothecary or natural medicine cabinet a little easier, I compiled a list of all the ingredients I like to keep on hand for making my own medicinal preparations, as well as a suggested list of herbs to start growing or stocking up on, and some other great resources to help you get started preparing and using your own herbal medicine at home.

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead to read the full article and download the checklist, or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/stock-a-home-apothecary/
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Stinging nettles are one of my favourite things to forage for in early spring. They’re ready to harvest well before just about anything is ready in our garden, and they’re a superfood as well as a medicinal plant packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals including vitamins A, B, C & K, calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus and iron, plus they’re super high in protein.

As a medicinal plant, nettles are a natural antihistamine and can help with season allergies, they have properties that reduce inflammation and especially joint inflammation and arthritis, they can be used to treat of urinary tract infections and enlarged prostate symptoms, the e been shown to lower blood pressure and control blood sugar and more!

Some people even swear by harvesting stinging nettles with their bare hands as the sting itself is said to help with muscle and joint pain/arthritis!

I, however, am not that brave. I definitely recommend wearing gloves, long sleeves, long pants and boots when harvesting stinging nettles! But the good news is that once you cook or dry the nettles, they no longer sting you. My favourite way to prepare them is to dry them and enjoy them as a herbal tea! But they’re good sautéed in stir fry or added to soups (in place of spinach or Kale) too. Whatever you do, just don’t put them fresh into a salad!

Stinging nettles grow wild all over North America (as well as other places), and spring is the best time to forage for them. To learn how to safely identify them, harvest them and prepare/preserve them, check out the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/harvest-and-use-stinging-nettles/

Have you ever foraged for stinging nettle before?
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If you're looking to increase production in your own home garden, you know how important bees and other pollinators are to your overall yield.⁠

Honeybees get a lot of the glory, and for good reason: It's said that honeybees alone are responsible for pollinating 80% of our fruits and vegetables! Not to mention, they make honey... Sweet, glorious, highly nutritious and DELICIOUS honey!⁠

In this day and age of global food shortages, we need to do whatever we can to help increase food production at home and abroad, and helping honeybees is one of the best ways to do just that.⁠

Click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/3-easy-ways-to-help-save-the-bees/ to learn what you can do at home to help save the bees, and the many, MANY reasons why it matters!⁠
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I don't know about you, but around here spring officially marks the beginning of what we call "busy season."⁠

I always remind myself, though, that the payoff from the work we put in at this time of year is so totally worth the extra elbow grease and long hours.⁠

The seeds we sow now will provide us with food and medicine to stock our pantry and apothecary with in the summer and fall.⁠

The projects we start now will (hopefully) be finished and ready to serve us later in the year.⁠

And the deep cleaning and organizing we do now in our homes will set the stage and the tone for the rest of the season.⁠

Personally, I don't operate very well in a disorganized, messy or dirty environment. Whether I'm working or just relaxing, if my home is in disarray I feel like I can't fully concentrate on or enjoy whatever I'm doing.⁠

For most of the year this means sticking to a daily routine of tidying up and light cleaning when necessary. But in the spring, I like to take a few days to deep clean our home so that the rest of the season runs smoother; So that when I'm in the thick of gardening and harvesting and preserving season, I'm not also contending with dirt and stains and pine needles from Christmas!⁠

That being said, I don't like to use any commercially produced chemical cleaners, so I always make sure to keep a few natural ingredients on hand to get the job done.⁠

Over the years I've tried a lot of store-bought "natural" cleaners, and honestly I haven't been impressed with most of them. In fact, I find some white vinegar, baking soda, dish soap, water and a few essential oils are all I really need to clean most of my house!⁠

If the spring cleaning bug has bit you too, be sure to check out my DIY Spring Cleaning Recipes via the link in my bio. Every recipe is made with simple, natural ingredients that you probably have on hand already. I also like to add essential oils to my cleaning products for their scent and natural cleaning and disinfecting power, but you can omit them if you like:)⁠

Link in bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/spring-cleaning-recipes/
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If there's one thing we should all be doing to hedge against looming food shortages and inflation right now, it's growing some of our own food at home.⁠

I've been preaching the many benefits of homegrown food for years now... Long before any of the madness we're currently experiencing took hold.⁠

A couple years ago when I launched my first gardening course, I mentioned in my sales video that we were just one emergency situation away from grocery store shelves being cleared out entirely. Within two weeks of that video, the pandemic hit, and the rest is history.⁠

The fact is, whether you're worried about shortages, the skyrocketing price of EVERYTHING, or you simply want to eat better, healthier foods free from GMOs and chemical sprays, learning how to grow even a little bit of your own organic food at home puts power and food security back in your hands.⁠

That's exactly why I’ve teamed up with 16+ other speakers for the Backyard Vegetable Gardener's Summit: A free, 3-day online event where you can learn how to get started or get better at growing food and creating your own personal grocery store, right in your own backyard!⁠

Here are just a few of the presentations coming up this week:⁠

🌱 7 Ways To Maximize Space In Your Urban Garden⁠
🌱 Creating a Personal Seed Bank⁠
🌱 How to Generate Income From Your Garden⁠
🌱 Easy Ways to Quickly Improve Your Garden Soil⁠
🌱 Indoor Container Gardening⁠
🌱 Growing Turmeric & Ginger at Home⁠
🌱 How to Use Succession Planting for Higher Yields⁠

And more!⁠

Plus, don't miss my masterclass where I teach you everything you need to know to grow a BUMPER CROP OF TOMATOES in your backyard! 🍅🍅🍅⁠

From starting your seeds to planting out and caring for your tomato plants all season long, I'll show you the exact method we use to grow hundreds of pounds of tomatoes at home for fresh eating and preserving each year.⁠

The summit officially starts TODAY! If you haven't registered yet, click the link in my bio @thehouseandhomestead or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/bvgs to save your seat and start watching and learning right away!
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“When I think of self-reliance, I think of any ability to rely less on ‘the system.’”

I sat down with Ashley Constance from @dirtypawshomestead and the @alittleselfreliant podcast to talk about what it means to be self-reliant, if it’s even possible to be 100% self-reliant and why it’s a goal worth striving for even if complete and total self-reliance isn’t possible.

Be sure to check out the full interview in the latest issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine!

Subscribe @ modernhomesteadingnmagazine.com

I’d love to know, what are you currently doing to become a little (more) self-reliant? Let me know in the comments!👇
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