Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)


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Make your own homemade pasta without a pasta maker! This homemade pasta recipe is simple to create by hand and requires only a few basic ingredients:) #homemadepasta #homemadepastarecipe #homemadenoodles #homemadeeggnoodlesDid you know it’s possible to make homemade pasta without a pasta maker? Because it is, and it’s actually a lot easier than you might think!

I’ve wanted to learn how to make homemade pasta from scratch for quite some time now. The thing is, when pasta’s as cheap and plentiful as it usually is at the grocery store, it’s hard to justify making it from scratch.

But now that we’re in the middle of a global pandemic and the pasta section of our local grocery store is pretty much completely bare, I figure that’s a clear enough sign that it’s time to start making my own fresh pasta at home.

Like most staple recipes that require some combination of eggs, flour and water, homemade pasta isn’t difficult to make by any stretch. In fact, as far as dough goes, it’s one of the easiest and most forgiving doughs I’ve worked with.

The problem is, I don’t have a pasta maker, so I put off even trying to make my own pasta at home for fear of it being too complicated without one.

While I do admit it would probably be easier with a pasta maker, it wasn’t exactly difficult to do it all by hand. Using a pasta maker just helps roll the dough out really thin and cuts it really straight and evenly.

Still, rolling and cutting it out by hand was more time-consuming than difficult, and it’s hard to get the dough as thin as you could with a machine.

But for anyone searching for pasta right now and unable to find it, or really for anyone who just wants to try making fresh pasta at home but doesn’t own a pasta maker, this way is really easy to do with just a rolling pin and a sharp knife or a pizza cutter.

 

How to make homemade pasta without a pasta maker

Obviously you have to start by making your pasta dough. Pasta noodles are egg noodles, so you’ll need 6 eggs, as well as 4 to 4½ cups of all-purpose flour. (Pasta is traditionally made with semolina flour, but when making your own, all-purpose is fine).

Either in a mixing bowl, on a large plate or directly on your countertop, take 4 cups of flour and make a well in the middle.

Eggs and flour | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

Crack one or two of the eggs into the well and gently start scooping the flour into the middle, mixing it with the eggs, careful not to break the well if doing this directly on your counter.

* This is the old-school Italian grandma technique, but if you want to make sure to avoid an eggy, floury mess on your counter, just use a mixing bowl. You can also use a stand mixer. I’ve tried both and I find both methods work just as well, but the stand mixer does all the kneading for you. Then again, I feel like making pasta just wouldn’t be the same without kneading it like a nonna;)

Mixing eggs and flour | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

Add the remaining eggs into the well one at a time, mixing with the flour until it starts to form a dough. Continue until all the eggs have been added and the mixture has formed a shaggy dough ball.

Lightly flour your countertop and your hands, and transfer the dough ball to your countertop. Knead for a couple minutes, until the dough really starts to come together.

Form a little well with two fingers in the middle of the dough and add one tablespoon of water. Gently work the water into the dough by folding it in and continuing to knead.

Adding water to homemade pasta dough | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

As you knead, add the remaining two tablespoons of water if you find you need them to get the dough to stick and start to smooth out. If the dough is sticking fine, it’s not actually necessary to add any water. But it helps to get a nice, smooth dough when you’re making it by hand.

Add more flour to your hands and to the countertop as needed to avoid the dough sticking. If the dough is really sticky, you can add up to another ½ cup of flour, but do so slowly, one tablespoon at a time. You really want to keep that egg to flour ratio up so don’t add too much flour if you don’t need to.

Making pasta dough | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

This is definitely NOT smooth enough yet!

Continue kneading dough for another 10 minutes or so until dough is smooth and elastic but not sticking to your hands or the counter.

Wrap in plastic wrap or a plastic bag (which you can reuse) and set aside to rest for half an hour.

Pasta dough resting in a bowl | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

That’s nice and smooth:)

 

Rolling & cutting your pasta dough by hand

Rolling out your dough is the hardest part when making fresh pasta by hand because it’s hard to get the pasta as thin with just a rolling pin. But you can still get it thin enough for a delicious bowl of homemade pasta, and if you don’t have a pasta maker, a rolling pin works in a pinch.

Lightly flour your surface again and cut your dough into four equal parts. Roll each part out one at a time. Roll into a long rectangle until you get it as thin as you can with your rolling pin. We’re going for like, as close to 1/8 of an inch thickness as possible.

Rolling pasta dough by hand | Rolling pasta dough with a rolling pin | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

Once you’ve rolled out your dough, cut off the outer edges with a knife or a pizza cutter so you’ve got a perfect rectangle, or leave them on for a more rustic look. You can roll the cut edges into one of the other pieces of dough to reuse the extra.

Slice your dough into pasta noodles about the width of fettuccini or thinner. Use either a pizza cutter or a kitchen knife. Or there’s also this cool rolling pin pasta cutter that I haven’t personally tried but looks pretty rad 🙂

Cutting pasta dough with a knife | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

Separate your pasta and hang to dry on a pasta dryer or you can make your own like we did!

Hanging pasta to dry | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

My husband used an old curtain rod that he then hung from some hooks that were already in our kitchen ceiling. It worked great and looks cool too;)

Home-made pasta drying rack | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

Here’s another look…
Mind the party decor. We had a family party at home the other night because you’ve gotta keep things interesting during a quarantine!

Alternatively, you can hang homemade pasta noodles on your oven handle, but you will need to let it dry in batches.

Hanging pasta on oven door | Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

Let pasta hang to dry for about 15 to 20 minutes before cooking or storing. It’s important to let fresh pasta dry for a little bit even before cooking to prevent noodles from sticking together.

To cook, bring a pot of salted water to a boil and add fresh pasta. Cook time will vary depending on how thick your noodles are. We’ve found it can take anywhere between 5 to 10 minutes depending on how thick and how dry your noodles are, and whether you prefer your pasta al dente or a little softer. Check one of the noodles for doneness before straining the water out.

After you strain the water out, drizzle just a little bit of olive oil over the hot noodles and toss to coat to prevent them from sticking. Top with your favourite sauce or with a little more olive oil and parmesan cheese, or however you prefer to eat your pasta!

Try it with a side of homemade bread slathered in homemade garlic herb butter. Drool ?

Homemade Pasta (Without A Pasta Maker)

 

How to store homemade pasta

If you’d prefer to make your pasta ahead of time and store it for later, you can either keep pasta bent in half after hanging it to dry or bend pasta into little nests by gently twirling noodles around your fingers and place in a Ziplock bag in the fridge for later (homemade fresh pasta will store in the fridge for about 2 to 3 days). Or you can place them in the freezer and freeze for 2 to 3 months.

Alternatively, you can dehydrate pasta and store in your pantry just like dried store-bought pasta. To dehydrate you pasta, dry in a dehydrator at 135ºF for about 3 or 4 hours, until pasta is dry and brittle enough that it snaps in two easily.

You can also air dry homemade pasta, but you’ll need to dry it for longer. Make sure that your pasta noodles are completely dry and snap in half easily before storing them in a plastic bag or a container in your pantry.

CAUTION: Dried homemade pasta is shelf stable when completely dry, but any moisture leftover could cause harmful bacteria to form and make your pasta unsafe to eat. So make sure it’s really dry!

You can cook dried homemade pasta the same way as you cook dried store-bought pasta. Refrigerated pasta and frozen pasta should be cooked for roughly the same amount of time as fresh pasta, maybe 30 seconds to one minute longer. But again, always test one noodle to make sure you’re happy with the doneness before straining noodles, just in case you need to cook them for little bit longer.

And that’s all folks! Homemade pasta without a pasta maker: It’s that easy.

So the next time you go to buy pasta and find the grocery store shelves bare or you just want a fun and impressive but easy to execute new kitchen project, try your hand at this making this super simple homemade pasta recipe. Then get yourself a pasta maker and you might never go back to buying pasta from the store again!

(At least, that’s my plan anyway 😉


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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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