Homemade Laundry Detergent Recipe


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This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachinesThe safety and efficacy of homemade laundry detergent is a very hotly debated topic. In fact, it’s up there with things like canning safety, and possibly religion and politics as well!

Many people claim that homemade laundry detergents are either bad for your clothes, bad for your washing machine, or both. I’ve read many articles that claim homemade laundry soaps and detergents either don’t work (ie. leave clothes looking and smelling dirty), have discoloured people’s clothes (leaving whites yellow and colours looking dull),  or left soap residue in the fibres of clothes.  Some say it even ruined their washing machines, specifically front loaders and HE washing machines.

Not to mention the many online sources that claim that if your washing machine goes on the fritz during your warranty period and you’ve been using homemade laundry detergent, your warranty will be void.

On top of all of that, borax -a common ingredient used in homemade laundry detergent- has been called into question for safety reasons, as it can be toxic and even deadly if ingested or used indicated on skin.

? No wonder making your own laundry detergent is such a controversial topic!

However, I’ve been making and using homemade laundry detergent for about 2½ years now and not only have I never had a problem with the recipe that I use, our clothes are as clean as ever, our brand new (as of three years ago) Electrolux-brand HE front loader washing machine still runs perfectly well and has no built up soap residue (although we do a vinegar rinse once every 50 loads or so… when our fancy washing machine reminds us that it’s time;).

Since we started making our own, we’ve easily saved a few hundred dollars on store-bought laundry detergent, which is honestly the biggest reason why we make our own at home.

I will say, most other recipes I’ve read call for grated bar soap, and this can definitely be a culprit for soap residue, so I’m thinking that the fact that I use liquid Castile soap in my recipe makes a big difference. I’ll talk more about ingredients in a minute, but keep that in mind… Do not substitute grated bar soap for liquid Castile soap, or liquid dish soap for that matter! You will not get the same results and I definitely wouldn’t use either of those ingredients in my own washing machine.

That being said, I’m going to share my recipe with you today, but as a disclaimer I will say you would be wise to check your warranty and do additional research if you’re worried at all about using homemade detergent in your machine. I can only share that this has worked perfectly well for us, and that we have never had a problem with this particular recipe.

I’ll tell you the exact recipe we use and the exact amount we add to each load, and I can say with certainty that we have never had a load come out of the washing machine smelling or looking dirty, and have never had a problem with soap residue gumming up our washing machine (or clothes). But I cannot be held responsible for any adverse results you may experience, just to be clear.

I’m just sharing what works for me and my family, and homemade laundry detergent is something I’ve been asked about multiple times over the years, so I figured now is as good a time as any to share my recipe and experience with you!

 

Related: Spring Cleaning Recipes With Essential Oils

 

How much does it cost to make your own laundry detergent at home?

I wish I was one of those Type-A women who kept meticulous track of everything in her budget and that I had an exact cost per load to share with you, but alas, I am not that woman! What I can say is that I used to use a brand of all-natural detergent called Nellie’s All-Natural, which cost somewhere between $20 and $30 a box for powdered detergent which was meant to last for 60 loads, and I usually had to purchase around 3 or 4 boxes of this detergent per year, which means I spent between $60 to $90 per year on laundry detergent. Keep in mind that I’m also Canadian, so this was in CAD.

When I switched to making my own laundry detergent, I spent about $60 on all of the ingredients up front, but those ingredients have now lasted us about 2½ years, and we still have some ingredients leftover. This works out to around $25 per year (a savings of $35 to $65 per year based on what I was spending before).

Not bad if you ask me! But again, this may also depend on where you live, your currency and how much the ingredients cost in your area (if purchasing them locally).

Regardless, homemade laundry detergent will save you money one way or another.

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

Is homemade laundry detergent all-natural?

Another reason why I prefer to make my own laundry detergent is because I’ve been on a years-long mission to eliminate synthetic fragrances and chemicals from our home. Store-bought detergents often contain an array of harmful synthetic chemicals including sulfates, synthetic surfactants, phenols and petroleum distillates to name a few. Not to the mention synthetic fragrances that are in most conventional laundry detergents. Those store-bought detergents that smell like “lavender,” “fresh cotton” or a “tropical sunset” are full of synthetic chemicals that stay in your clothes and can cause irritation. I’ve used detergents before where the smell was so strong that it gave me headaches. This concoction of chemicals can be absorbed by your skin as well. For this reason, I switched to an all-natural detergent a number of years ago, but like I said, it still easily cost me between $60 to $90 per year just to clean our clothes. So I decided to start making my own for a fraction of the price and haven’t bought laundry detergent since!

The homemade laundry detergent recipe below uses all natural ingredients, all of which are safe when handled and diluted correctly.

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

Ingredients in homemade laundry detergent

Different recipes for homemade laundry detergent call for different ingredients. Some of them call for grating a bar of soap. Some of them call for borax while others omit it, and some I’ve seen even call for using Dawn dish detergent (which I wouldn’t recommend due to the crazy amount of suds this can produce –and leak out of your machine– as well as the soap residue it can leave behind).

I also don’t recommend using grated bar soap as this can also leave behind lots of soapy residue, both in the fibres of your clothes and in your washing machine.

Instead, I use Dr. Bronner’s liquid Castile soap, and I’ve never had a problem with soapy residue. 

I also use Arm & Hammer brand washing soda, which is similar to baking soda, but has a slightly different chemical makeup which is much more alkaline than baking soda. Washing soda is an 11 on the PH scale whereas baking soda is an 8. The high alkalinity of washing soda makes it a more effective stain remover than baking soda, which is an essential component of a good laundry detergent.

And finally, I do use borax in my laundry detergent, which I’ll touch on in more detail in just a moment.

Borax is also a very alkaline substance (around 9.5 to 10 on the PH scale). Once again, this is what makes borax an effective stain remover, just like washing soda. But this high alkalinity means that even though both of these ingredients are natural, they must be handled with caution and you should avoid touching them with bare skin. This is very similar to using lye in homemade soap: There’s nothing inherently dangerous about making homemade soap or using lye (which is even higher in alkalinity at about 14 on the PH scale), but if handled with bare hands, it can irritate or even burn skin.

Personally we don’t use gloves when making our homemade laundry detergent, but if you want to play it safe then gloves couldn’t hurt.

Otherwise, I do like to add some essential oils to my laundry detergent for a nice scent, but this part is totally optional. Sometimes I omit the oils and just add a few drops of essential oils to my wool dryer balls to add a little fresh scent to my clothing in the dryer.

 

What is borax?

Borax is a natural boron compound that is mined from mineral deposits that (from the research I’ve done) were left behind from hot springs in places like Death Valley. In fact, according to popular borax brand 20 Mule Team Borax, “U.S. Borax traces its roots to California’s Death Valley, where borate deposits were discovered in 1872. The first 20 mule team hauled borax a sweeping 165 miles through Death Valley in 1883.”

According to the Death Valley Natural History Association website, “borax belongs to a group of boron minerals called borates resembling quartz crystals, fibrous cotton balls or earthy white powders. They originated in hot springs or vapors associated with the outpouring of volcanic rocks such as the colorful formations of Artists Drive. Seeping groundwater formed glassy borate veins in the extinct lake beds of Furnace Creek and has moved soluble borates to modern salt flats such as the floor of Death Valley. There, evaporation has left a mixed white crust of salt, borax, and alkalies.”

While borax is a natural substance, it can be dangerous if ingested and can cause skin rashes, eye irritation, nausea and, if ingested, it can even cause death! But then again, so can bleach.

Borax has also been used as an effective detergent in laundry rooms across North America for decades. The first box I got was from my grandma who used to use it to do her laundry. While it must absolutely be handled with care and caution and kept out of reach of children (we keep ours high up on top of our standing freezer by our washing machine), borax is perfectly safe to use diluted in homemade laundry detergent. 

So, now that we’ve got all of those disclaimers and cautionary tales out of the way, let’s move on to the recipe.

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

How to make your own liquid laundry detergent

To make your own liquid laundry detergent, start by bringing 8 cups of water to a boil.

While your water is boiling, add one cup of borax and one cup of washing soda to a large jug or bucket. I find that a gallon jar is just a little bit too small for this recipe, so if possible use something a little bit larger. We use an old 5 litre vinegar jug and just mix everything in there.

Once you’ve added the borax and washing soda, add one cup of liquid Castile soap, then add 8 cups of boiling water and mix it well to dissolve all the ingredients. (If using a jug, I find it’s useful to use a tea towel or oven mitts to hold the jug and shake it up as the boiling water will make it quite hot).

When it’s well mixed and the ingredients have fully dissolved, add another 8 cups of cold water and mix again.

At this point, you can add some essential oils if you like. I like to use either lavender or Plant Therapy’s Deodorizing Blend. I know moms people who suggest lemon essential oil, but I don’t risk using lemon oil as it has the potential to stain your clothes. Plant Therapy also has their own set of laundry blends if you wanna mix it up!

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

If using essential oils, I like to add about 50 drops and then mix all of the ingredients together one more time.

Let your laundry detergent sit until it cools to room temperature. It will likely start to congeal to a thick white consistency.

To use, add about ¼ cup of laundry detergent to each load. We have a pre-measured ¼ cup scoop that we use to measure out our detergent, although in all honesty, I’ve been free pouring for about the past 6 months or so.

Do be careful not to add too much though as I’ve read that this can cause the issue of soapy residue!

 

How I dry my clothes

As a self-proclaimed “homesteader,” I feel like I’m expected to line dry my laundry and love the feel of crisp cotton on my skin, but in all honesty, I don’t. I might start line drying our laundry someday, but I’ll still probably throw it in to the dryer for a quick refresh to soften it up. that being said, I don’t like using dryer sheets for the same reasons I don’t like using conventional laundry detergent: They’re expensive, full of synthetic chemicals and can be harmful to our own health and to the environment.

But I also hate static cling, so I opt for using wool dryer balls instead.

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

I’ve been using dryer balls for longer than I’ve been making my own laundry detergent for, and they work just as well as dryer sheets but are 100% natural and can be reused over and over again.

Personally, I like to add a few drops of essential oils to my dryer balls before I toss them in with our laundry. HOWEVER, a reader recently informed me that adding essential oils to dryer balls has been linked to dryer fires as the oils can hit their flashpoint in a hot dryer and ignite! So I would definitely caution against this. The dryer balls on their own, however, are definitely worth the small investment up front as they will last for a very long time.

And that’s all you need for your natural homemade laundry routine!

Tell me, what does your laundry care routine look like? Do you line dry your clothes or do you prefer the dryer? Let me know in the comments below:)

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

Homemade Laundry Detergent Recipe

Yield: 1 GALLON plus a bit more

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Bring 8 cups of water to a boil. While your water is boiling, add one cup of borax and one cup of washing soda to a large jug or bucket. Mix well.
  2. Add one cup of liquid Castile soap, then add the 8 cups of boiling water and mix it well to dissolve all the ingredients.
  3. Once it’s well mixed and the ingredients have fully dissolved, add another 8 cups of cold water and mix again.
  4. At this point, you can add some essential oils if you like. If using essential oils, I like to add about 50 drops and then mix all of the ingredients together one more time.

  5. Let your laundry detergent sit until it cools to room temperature. Depending on the temperature, it may remain liquid or it may congeal to a thick white consistency.
 To use, add about ¼ cup of laundry detergent to each load.

 


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

169 Comments

  1. Madelyn

    Can I use scented Dr Bronners liquid soap? I am wondering if the scents would come through at all. Would it change the consistency or anything?

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      It shouldn’t change the consistency, but yes, the aromas will definitely come through if you use something like the tea tree or the peppermint. It should still work just fine though! -Ashley (assistant)

      Reply
  2. Taffy

    Wow, you are so patient with every response! It must really work, and I applaud your thinking outside the box!
    I have a lot of woolens I’d like to hand wash. Do you think your recipe is mild enough for wool or cashmere?

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Taffy – I am a knitter myself and I take my hand-washing of my precious wool, alpaca etc. hand-knits VERY seriously. I personally stick with SOAK brand scentless wool wash in lukewarm water and hand-wash. Your question prompted me to do some googling…it seems that the general consensus is to avoid using alkaline substances (borax, washing soda, etc.) on wool, so I’d personally probably stick with a wool-specific washing technique. -Ashley (assistant)

      Reply
      • Adara Lovins

        I tried making the laundry detergent today. I followed the directions and ingredients, except that I stirred them to mix. And my mixture never turned white nor stsrted to thicken or congeal…is it still useable?

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          Hi Adara,

          It’s not entirely essential for the mixture to congeal or turn white to be effective…so many things can influence this…temperature, water, etc. If the mixture is still liquid, I’d give it a good vigorous shake to combine and still use it. -Ashley (assistant)

          Reply
  3. Sammy Sweet

    If our washing machine is not HE or front loading, would we use a larger amount per load?

    Reply
  4. Emileigh

    Hello, does anyone know if I could use bar Castile soap instead? I have a bar I was going to shred up and mix in with the other powders before adding hot water? Just wondering if anyone has tried

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Emileigh,
      In short, yes, you can use grated Castile bar soap. Many laundry soap recipes call for grated bar soap. However I find that bar soap can leave more of a film on clothes. Also, I couldn’t tell you off the top of my head if the ratios would be exactly the same. I’d have to do some digging and testing first. However there are lots of recipes online that call for bar soap instead so I’m sure you will find one if that’s what you’re after:)

      Reply
  5. Samantha

    (My question initially ended up as a reply to someone else, whoops! So here it is on its own.)

    I’m wondering if I should pour the boiling water in with the powder ingredients first, let them dissolve and then add the Castile soap so that it doesn’t bubble too much while stirring or adding the water. Anyone have experience with this or have any thoughts? Thanks!

    Reply
  6. Kylie Walden

    Hi! I’m wanting to try out this recipe, but I’m wondering what temperature will I wash my clothes on? Is cold water okay or do I need to use warm water to be sure it cleans well enough? Thank you for posting this recipe I’m excited to try!

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Kylie – I checked with Anna, and she said while she hasn’t tried it herself, it probably should work in a cold water wash. The only issue might be that things don’t dissolve as well. Let us know if you try it! -Ashley (Assistant)

      Reply
    • Ann

      I have always used it in cold water. Works great. ?

      Reply
    • Ann

      , …and regarding the soap not dissolving, it true that this soap congeals quite a bit in certain room temperatures and therefore doesn’t dissolve very well in cold water. But my remedy for that is to use an electric hand-held mixer and give it a swirl in the large Mason jar I store it in. Just shaking the jar isn’t always sufficient. The soap is worth this small effort. No toxic crap on the family’s skin. ☺️

      Reply
    • Sarah

      I normally double the water amount in the detergent when I use cold water, it rinses more completely that way and doesn’t clog up your machine.

      Reply
  7. Michelle

    Is this supposed to be watery and not thicken? First time at making laundry soap. Smells good just wanted to make sure on that part. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Some people have issues with it thickening up, other people find it congeals…my guess is that it really depends on the temperature of your house! If you followed all of the steps correctly, you should be good to go – just give it a good shake before you use it 🙂 -Ashley (Assistant)

      Reply
      • Danielle

        Wait I’m confused is it supposed to be watery or thick? Mine is very watery and I followed the instructions correctly

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          Either is fine as long as you followed the directions correctly! Consistency may vary depending on specific ingredients, your water, temperature of your home, etc. Just shake it up before you use it to make sure it’s all well-combined.

          Reply
  8. Autumn

    Hi! I’ve been using this detergent for several months now, and I like it so far. But lately I’ve been noticing some oil/grease stains on some of my clothes. Has anyone else noticed this? I do work in a kitchen so I’m wondering if it may be partially from that, but I’m starting to notice stains on the clothes that I don’t even wear to work. If this is in fact being caused by the detergent, is there anything I can do to the next batch to ensure that doesn’t happen? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Autumn,

      I can’t speak to that as that’s not something that Anna has ever experienced with this recipe, but perhaps somebody else will chime in.

      Reply
    • Francis Gutowski

      Why would you want to contaminate it with magnesium, which reacts with soap to form scum and borax to precipitate magnesium borate?

      Reply
      • Samantha

        I’m wondering if I should pour the boiling water in with the powder ingredients first, let them dissolve and then add the Castile soap so that it doesn’t bubble too much while stirring or adding the water. Anyone have experience with this or have any thoughts? Thanks!

        Reply
    • Sarah

      Double the water amount in the detergent and see if that fixes it, either that or use half the detergent you normally would. I found I always get grease stains no matter the type of detergent I use when I’ve used too much and it’s not rinsing properly.

      Reply
  9. Nel

    Hi Anna,

    I line dry my clothes but wait til the sun has gone down so the moisture in the air fluffs them up once the sun has gone off them. Been doing it for nearly 30 years. Even works on towels and cloth nappies. I use vinegar in my rinse water as a fabric softener too. will try to make my own laundry detergent though

    Reply
  10. Christina

    Hi. I wonder if I can substitute Epsom salt for the borax? Thoughts on this? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Christina,

      I don’t think that would work the same way. Borax actually absorbs dirt and cleans things like mold, and epsom salt does not have the same properties.

      Reply
      • Christina

        Thanks!

        Reply
      • Francis Gutowski

        Why would you want to contaminate it with magnesium, which reacts with soap to form scum and borax to precipitate magnesium borate?

        Reply
  11. Linda

    Hi Anna,

    I hear that washing soda can lighten and fade clothes. We have a lot of navy and black cotton clothes which I always wash with liquid laundry detergent for colors because I don’t want them to fade. How does this detergent perform on dark clothes? Any fading? Or should I just keep it for whites?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Linda,
      I have been using this homemade detergent for a number of years now and I have mostly black clothes. I haven’t noticed much fade. Certainly no more than with a standard detergent. If anything I would say the whites aren’t as white over time, so I do add a natural laundry booster from time to time. But overall this detergent has worked just as well for me as a regular store-bought detergent.

      Reply
    • Nel

      Hi Linda,

      Have you tried hanging your washing inside out and also ironing them inside out as this makes a big difference to them fading.

      Reply
  12. Marysa

    I would love to start making my own laundry detergent. It is always good to be able to know exactly what it going into your products.

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Absolutely! Let us know how this recipe works for you if you do end up trying it 🙂

      Reply
  13. Anna

    It’s my third time making this. It’s my go-to recipe. However, this time, I accidently poured the castille soap in the with the borax and laudry booster without mixing the powders first. Hope this will turn out ok regardless.
    Just a quick comment to those who find themselves turned off by congealed laundry soap. I keep on old Braun hand-held mixer for these things and just give it a swirl in my mason jar when I don’t like the consistency. Works great every time. Cheers. ?

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Great tip! So glad you’re enjoying the recipe 🙂

      Reply
      • Debbie Lovely

        mine separated in less than 24hour. the water is separate from the powder that separated from the castile. its all weird and fibrous looking. like vines. what happened?

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          Hmm, I’m not sure about the fibrous looking situation…but some separation can be normal. Did you try shaking to re-combine?

          Reply
        • Anna

          Yes, mine does that sometimes too. I think it has a lot to do with the temperature of the space it sits in. As I mentioned before, I have an old Braun hand-held mixer I use for things like this and just give it a swirl in my big mason jar when I don’t like the consistency. Works great every time. Please don’t let that be a turn off from using this laundry soap. It’s a worthy recipe. Cheers ?

          Reply
    • Francis Gutowski

      Look at how much soap you’re washing with. About 3/4 tsp./load. This is so diluted that it’s like washing with plain water!

      Reply
      • Anna Sakawsky

        I’m trying to understand your comment, but I’m not even sure if you’re replying to my recipe or to someone else? I use much more than 3/4 teaspoon per load and the laundry always comes out clean, save for the odd white garment that’s badly stained:)

        Reply
        • Tiffany

          I don’t see a spot for my own comment but this is for Anna. So after following all the recipe I realized my husband grabbed pure baking soda not the washing soda. I know there’s a difference but can I still use this so it’s not wasted? Thanks 😊

          Reply
          • Ashley Constance

            Hi Tiffany – the substitution of baking soda shouldn’t be an issue safety-wise (in terms of using it in your washing machine) but it just might not clean quite as well as washing soda. Washing soda has a better ability to break down things like oil and grease. However, we’d love to hear how it goes if you try it out! -Ashley (assistant)

  14. Cel

    Thinking about family men who aren’t big on measuring… I’m wondering if adding 3 parts water to 1 part detergent would help keep it from congealing and too much being used?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      I don’t see why that wouldn’t work! Obviously it would dilute it so I can’t guarantee what the results would be in the wash, but otherwise that might be a good idea. I’m a bit of a “free pourer” myself too and end up using more than I need to, so I might just try diluting a bit more myself next time I make a batch;)

      Reply
  15. Stacey

    I made my second batch tonight! I’m so happy with this recipe. The first batch, I was a bit worried bc it congealed and it looked like water at the bottom and I realized I needed to shake well and we just pour into the dispenser now. This batch seems to be remaining more liquidy. Either way, thank you!

    Reply
  16. Desiree

    Hello,
    I made this recipe a few days ago and after sitting for a couple days part of it has congealed, and there’s crystallized stuff at the bottom. Should I boil it again?

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Some congealing is normal, especially in cooler temperatures. Give it a good shake / mix before using.

      Reply
      • Desiree

        What about the crystallized stuff? That won’t mix in

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          You can try boiling it all again if you’d like, that’s just not something I can speak about from experience. Do let us know if you try it, though!

          Reply
        • Alayna

          Hi! Would using Dr. Bronner’s – Peppermint version make a big difference? Or should I just use the unscented on at add my own peppermint oil?

          Reply
          • Ashley Constance

            I can’t imagine it would make a big difference as long as the formulation is the same – but if you want to play it safe, I’d follow the recipe exactly.

          • Anna Sakawsky

            Hi Alayna, I see my lovely assistant replied to you, which is great! I just wanted to add that it shouldn’t be a problem at all to use the scented Dr. Bronner’s So long as you like the scent! I like to use unscented and then add my own scents in with essential oils when I’m in the mood for scented laundry. But I’m sure the peppermint would be quite nice!

        • Di Wright

          This happened to me too. It crystallised at the bottom. I’m going to reheat it on a low temp and see what happens.

          Reply
      • Amelia

        I made half a batch incase it didn’t turn out right…you say depending on what the temperature is…it will essentially harden…exactly at what temperature will it harden? I followed the steps to a T and mine is literally liquid. I however do live in Florida and keep my house at. 73 degrees. Does this matter?

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          I’m not sure exactly at which temperature the mixture congeals, but I would say that keeping your house on the warmer side may be a reason why it doesn’t. If you followed the directions and ingredients correctly, the mixture should still be usable and effective, even if it’s more on the liquid side. Just give it a good shake / mix before using. Hope this helps!

          Reply
  17. Brittany

    Hello,
    I just made this recipe and placed it in an empty (washed) vinegar jug and in the process of mixing as the directions say it actually created a lot of pressure in the jug preventing me from getting it mixed correctly so I ended up mixing it in a separate bowl then putting it back into the jug when it was all dissolved. There was ALOT of soap suds that were a pain to get calmed down. As I sit here and look at it it’s still remaining a water Consistency and isn’t doing what the directions said it would do. Any thoughts?

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Brittany – the only other thing I could suggest would be to place the detergent in a cooler place and see if it thickens up a bit. As for the suds – did you use pure liquid castille soap? If so, then I’m not sure…it may be a case of just needing to try again, but hopefully with time and cooler temperatures, the mixture thickens up a little and works well for you!

      Reply
    • Jeanette

      I made it, and the same thing happened to me, but it works wonderfully better than any laundry detergent I have made after sitting at also congealed a little bit. I shook it up. Some of the lumps came out, but some of them didn’t, but it still washed perfectly, and again got my clothes cleaner than any laundry detergent

      Reply
      • Ashley Constance

        This is so great to hear, Jeanette! Thank you for sharing and I’m glad you are enjoying the recipe.

        Reply
    • Denise Reynolds

      I added 8 cups boiling water to the powders in the vinegar jug first to dissolve. Then added soap and agitated slowly to reduce the sudsing. I would get pressure and burb the lid then mix a little more. Adding the rest of the cold water helped too. Once mixed I left lid open until totally cool.

      Reply
  18. Casey

    Can this go in the typical detergent dispenser area of the washing machine? Or should it go directly in the drum with the clothes?

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      It can go into the dispenser, but it shouldn’t matter either way 🙂

      Reply
      • Christy

        Hi there! So…could you ideally throw a bit of each right into the washing machine per load? Wondering because I have adhd and often forget to make the detergent…and then don’t have any…but have all the ingredients. Can I skip the making process and throw a certain amount of each thing (not essential oil) into the washer per load?

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          Hmm…I don’t know about that. I’m not sure if the result would be the same, given that the ingredients haven’t been properly and thoroughly mixed and dissolved.

          Reply
          • Linda

            I have done this. I have a top loader and sometimes do just this. I make one without Borax and I use my hand to give it a good swish, then rinse hand well and dry.
            (I seriously think I’m about a 0.5 on spectrum).
            When I make mine, I make concentrated (half the original water) and just let the fresh water in wash cycle dilute it.

          • Christy

            Is there any easy combo of things to just throw in the machine? Dash of borax + washing soda and be done? This recipe is great but it’s too much prep for my neuro divergent brain. I need no prep throw it in ideas.

        • Lucy

          It wouldn’t work because borax and washing soda need hot water and a soaking period to completely dissolve and thus become more effective. I attempted what you said before and the results were disappointing. Clothes did not wash well and certain stains were still visible. Hope this helps.

          Reply
        • Anna

          The powders need boiling water to dissolve in or it won’t work.

          Reply
    • Dawana Trahan

      Should I put the detergent In right away are wait until the machine fills up

      Reply
      • Ashley Constance

        Just add it as you would normal detergent – for me, that’s usually right away.

        Reply
  19. Jennifer Blankenship

    I made a batch this past weekend. Easy to make and it smells great! The only thing I’m worried about is that it separated and looks gritty now that the jars have sat for a couple of days. Is that normal? The soap was completely dissolved when I made it, and it was never “thick” so I’m not sure what I did wrong.

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Jennifer – don’t worry, some separation is normal. Just gently shake to combine before use.

      Reply
      • Trisha

        Mine turned solid? Any suggestions?

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          If it was stored in a cold place, then the temperature might be to blame as it tends to congeal / solidify a bit more when cold. If it truly solidified and unusable, then I’d just suggest trying again and ensuring the amounts of everything is correct!

          Reply
        • Anna

          I have an old Braun hand-held mixer I use for things like this and just give it a swirl in my big mason jar when I don’t like the consistency. Works great every time. Cheers ?

          Reply
      • Rebecca

        I’ve been using this laundry soap for about a year & I love it! Thanx for a chemical-free detergent that works marvelously!

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          So glad you love it! After all these years, I’m still using it and loving it too. And I have a now 6-month-old who has somehow 10X’d our laundry since he was born! It’s great because this recipe is non-toxic and also doesn’t irritate his sensitive skin.

          Reply
        • Ashley

          Made my first batch yesterday. Shook it up today and poured 1/4 cup in the washing machine to do a load. I usually run it with cold water and I noticed there’s no suds forming. What am I doing wrong?

          Reply
          • Anna Sakawsky

            Hi Ashley,
            Honestly I’ve never noticed much in the way of suds. There are some, but nothing too noticeable, but the clothes come out clean every time. I wouldn’t worry too much about how much sud it’s producing. So long as the clothes come out looking and smelling clean:)

  20. Ann Marie

    Just made a half batch in a glass juice jar. It looks great. Can’t wait to use it. Had no problem dissolving and mixing it all up. My water is well with a water softener. Used my electric tea kettle to “boil” two cups of water, dissolved the powders, added Castile, then two cups of water. I added 10 drops of Thieves. Doing a load of towels now. Yay! Thank you!

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      That’s great, Ann! I’m so glad the recipe worked well for you.

      Reply
  21. Marlene

    Sorry I am late in notifying you, but on November 19, 2022, I made this recipe. I followed it exactly.
    It’s one big gallon of——nothing. It glops into my HE detergent tray and I don’t see any suds…even small ones due to the Castile soap.

    My question is: Exactly HOW is this an effective detergent?

    Reply
    • Kay

      Same Marlene. I’m wondering if a reaction takes place when mixing the borax or washing powder and the castile soap. From what I’ve experienced, a similar reaction happens when mixing vinegar and castile soap.

      Reply
  22. Donald Nicholson

    I made the soap in a bucket and mixed it with a battery drill with a paddle attachment. I have a thick foam on top and liquid on the bottom . If I use the foam I does not resolve completely in the soap dispenser . Can I sprinkle salt on the foam to dissolve it and re mix the ingredients ?

    Reply
    • Cassie

      How do you use this in a dispenser if it gets thick?? How do you keep it from thickening up in the first place. I made a batch and after it cooled and sat for awhile it’s like pudding.

      Reply
      • Tiffany

        Mine did this. I just took my dispenser out like it says to do for powder and no more issues. You could also just pour directly into the washer instead of using the dispenser also. I noticed to that a good shake/stir before each use helps a lot for sure.

        Reply
  23. Shay

    I’d like to double or triple batch this. I was wondering if you have done this before and if so, would you basically add the same amount of each ingredient per 16 cups of water? Or would I need to reduce the amount of some of the ingredients if that makes sense?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Shay,
      I haven’t doubled the batch myself as this makes enough to last several months, but in theory it should work just fine. I would double or triple all of the ingredients (same as you would with a recipe_ and see how it goes. No promises but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work. Best of luck and let me know how it goes!

      Reply
  24. Susan Mendoza

    I did my first load with this recipe. My whites look really dingy after and I did a second rinse. Did I do something wrong when I made it?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Susan,
      So sorry you’ve had this issue. I haven’t had a problem before unless clothes were really stained or dirty (I usually do a pre-soak if they’re quite bad). If you followed the recipe I can’t see what you would have done wrong. It’s possible that if you’re used to using a standard store-bought detergent that the clothes aren’t quite as bright white as you’re used to. But they shouldn’t be dingy.

      Reply
    • L

      If you are using a HE machine you reduce the amount of detergent used because the machine uses less water. If they have white residue theres soap left on the clothing. You’re using too much.

      Reply
  25. Virginie

    Good recipe, thank you.
    About the toxicity of borax, you might want to read the following article. Borax can be taken as a health supplement! I had no idea either.

    Reply
  26. Jenny

    I made the recipe (in a hurry late at night) and I forgot the cold water step. Now it’s a hard substance in my bucket. Is there any way so salvage it now? I’d hate to waste all those ingredients!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Jenny,
      I would maybe try adding some hot water to soften it up and then let it cool down. Maybe start with half the amount of water but make it boiling, then add the remaining cold water once it’s dissolved and let cool. That’s what I would try. Let me know how it works out!

      Reply
      • Busy bee mama

        The ingredients say 16 cups water but the steps say 8 boiling+ 8 more boiling + 8 cold…so is it 24 cups of water? Or 18?

        Reply
        • Ashley Constance

          I believe the 8 cups of boiling water is the same 8 cups of boiling water at the start of the recipe. So 8 cups boiling + 8 cups cold = 16 cups. I’m going to double check with Anna, and if that’s not the case I’ll get back to you ASAP.

          -Ashley (Assistant)

          Reply
        • Josh

          Just from reading the recipe, it sounds like you put eight cups of water on to boil and you leave that boiling water there. While you’re waiting you combine the borax the washing soda and the Castile soap in a bucket and then you add those eight cups of water that are boiling to that and mix it well. After that you add
          the cups of cold water

          Reply
  27. Ashton

    I live this recipe and plant therapy oils! So far the laundry detergent has been cleaning my clothes but after a couple of days in the bucket/container and it’s chunky like gel. I have shaken and stirred. I used the recipe to the T. Is there anything I can do or anything I did wrong?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Ashton,
      It doesn’t sound like you did anything wrong. The consistency changes are normal. Ours also tends to gel. I just shake before each use to make sure it’s well combined as sometimes it likes to separate and it still works great and cleans our clothes well:)

      Reply
      • Ashton

        Thank you. I have a new washer and it seems to dissolve and not leave any build up.
        I shake and stir. Mine is pretty chunky and not really liquified underneath. I am loving the chemical free and enjoy your blog. Thank you.

        Reply
  28. Gloria

    Hi Anna, do you have a recipe for fabric softener for an HE washing machine?!?!

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Gloria – sorry, not at this time!

      Reply
    • Ashton P.

      I just made this yesterday. Already did a load and it was great. Was not worried about the thickness or bubbles after it was shook. Today it kinda looked chunky. Mixed it again and touched it and it was more like a gel I felt like would liquify. I have a HE too loader so it washes pretty well. Should still be ok if it’s chunking even after shaking right? It smells great. I actually got Castile soap that’s lavender sent. Plant Therapy oils are so nice!!! I plan on making more household cleaning products with it. Thank you for this recipe.

      Reply
    • Kim

      6 cups hot water
      2 cups of any conditioner
      3 cups vinegar
      Stir(not shake) together until dissolved

      Reply
  29. Rose

    Hi there, I am new to this and I fear I have done something wrong, I just made this liquid and once cooled I did a load of washing but it has come out with undissolved mixture on it. Can I re-boil the entire mixture to try dissolve it better or will I have to start again? Thank you

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Rose,
      If you are ending up with residue on your clothes you may just be using too much. Also, if you are adding the detergent directly into the tub of your machine rather than a soap dispenser, you may want to try putting it in the machine first and then putting your laundry in on top.

      Reply
      • Rose

        Thank you I will try adding less. I have a front loader so put liquid into the dispenser. I also had particles stuck in the rubber ring. I will see how I go using less next time. Would it be ok to re boil the mixture again incase I haven’t dissolved it properly the first time?

        Reply
        • Jamie Pearson

          Hi Rose,
          Anna would not recommend reboiling the finished product, but you could try adding a bit more boiling water and giving it a good shake before you do another load. If this still doesn’t work then you may have to start from scratch.

          Reply
        • Deb

          you can still put the detergent (homemade or otherwise) into the drum of the front-load machine. they just make the pour-in drawer because it’s convenient. just measure out the soap, lumpy or not, into a cup and pour it directly into the drum, then stick your clothes in shut the door and start washing

          Reply
    • Anna

      Sometime the soap stays lumpy and these lumps don’t always dissolve when washing in cold water. Use a hand-held mixer and just give it a swirl. Works great every time. Cheers ?

      Reply
  30. Breanna

    Hi there! Thank you for all of your details. Do you put the detergent in the container in the washer as normal, or do you put it right in the washer?

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Breanna,

      Anna puts the detergent in the container but you could try it directly in the washer if that is your preference. I would suggest putting it in first and then putting the clothes in on top.

      Reply
      • Lee

        I just made this and mine came out watery and I followed the directions to a tee. Is it supposed to be? Most laundry soaps I’ve used are a little thicker.

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          Hi Lee,
          It usually tends to thicken up as it cools. I actually noticed my latest batch was more watery than usual too so it could be the warmer temperatures as we head into summer. But typically it does thicken up and is not as liquidy. Either way it will still work fine. Just give it a good shake before using.

          Reply
          • Mollie

            I like this recipe. I didn’t have enough of Castile soap for the double recipe but when I put it in my front load machine it gave me suds errors

            **1/4 cup might be too much for some machines.

            I should have read through the comments as someone already said this. ?

    • Saidah

      Greetings, thank you for the recipe, I am looking forward to trying it! I’m wondering if adding vinegar in the final or separate/extra rinse would have an adverse effect on the laundry? Does anyone know? I believe that castille and vinegar are not good combinations together. Although the soap should be rinsed away, there maybe traces remaining.

      Reply
      • Jamie Pearson

        Hi Saidah,
        The issue with mixing Castile soap and vinegar is that they render each other ineffective, and the Castile will separate and become oily.
        Anna does not use vinegar with her laundry, but she will add it to a machine cleaning cycle every 40 or 50 loads.

        Reply
        • Saidah

          Thank you.

          Reply
      • Brittany

        Saidah, yes vinegar in the rinse cycle will help the laundry soften it (like a fabric softener). Using vinegar in the rinse cycle will also help reduce or eliminate the soap residue left behind over time on clothing and inside the washing machine. If your machine has a fabric softener compartment add vinegar to that so that it properly adds it to the rinse cycle. If not, add it manually to your rinse cycle.

        Reply
  31. Lindsey

    How can I adapt the recipe so that it stays liquid consistency?

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Lindsay,

      A varied consistency tends to be the nature of the recipe. It is affected by temperature and will stay more liquid if you keep it warm.

      Reply
    • Anna

      This is a perfect recipe No adapting required. Just use a hand-held mixer and give it a couple of swirls. The soap wil get nice and creamy.

      Reply
  32. Leena D.

    Hi there, I made this laundry soap today. Before it even was cooled completely it separated. Liquid on the bottom and thick and foamy on the top. What went wrong? Can I still use it in a front load washer?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Leena,
      It’s very common for it to separate, especially as it’s cooling. Just give it a good shake before you use it and it should be fine:)

      Reply
    • Cynthia Sicola

      How long does it take to gel? Mines at room temp but it’s still liquid.

      Reply
      • Jamie Pearson

        Hi Cynthia,

        The consistency of the laundry soap can range from quite liquid to fairly solid, but neither state will effect the performance. We recommend that you just give it a shake before each use.

        Reply
  33. Joice

    Can this detergent be used to wash laundry by hand?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Joice,
      I would be cautious using this detergent to wash clothes by hand as it contains Borax and Borax can irritate skin if it comes in direct contact. That being said, I have used it to wash clothes by hand before and I’ve been fine. You might want to wear gloves (ie. dish washing gloves) just in case.

      Reply
  34. Celeste

    What could I use instead of the soap?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Celeste,
      In this recipe you have to have some kind of soap for it to clean properly. Anna uses this brand of soap because it has no synthetics in it and is gentle while being effective. If you do not have this brand available to you, then perhaps you can use another similar soap for this particular recipe? Anna prefers the liquid over the solid type as it seems to reduce any residue left behind – as she has experienced.
      We can not guarantee, if you do choose to substitute the soap, that your results will be exactly the same as Anna’s (because we haven’t tried any other substitutions for this ingredient) but you are welcome to try something else. We would love to know how it works for you, if you do. 🙂

      Reply
      • Angela

        Good morning. Did I read somewhere that this was only good for front loader washing machines? I have a top loader.
        Does that matter?
        Thanks!

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          Hi Angela,
          This is good for all washing machines. I just specified that it’s good for front loaders as many homemade detergents aren’t so great for front loading machines but it should work just fine with a top loader too:)

          Reply
          • Bailey

            I’ve seen recipes that recommend cutting the amount per load in half for HE front loading machines. Do you recommend ¼ cup even for HE front loaders? Thank you!!

  35. michael zandri

    hi Anna….sounds great and can’t wait to get started on my first batch.

    Do you have a recipe for an All Purpose Cleaner that be be put into a spray bottle?

    Thanks,

    Reply
  36. Mary Johnson

    Love this recipe. I have been making my own laundry detergent for over a year. Your recipe is so much simpler than the one I had. I did have trouble when I mixed the borax, washing soda and castle soap it made a hard ball; so I added the borax and washing soda first and then add the castle soap to the water. It desolved fast. In the store laundry isle they now have scent booster to add to the wash, I used that instead of essential oils and it is much cheaper.

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      That sounds great, Mary.
      I’m glad you like our simple and easy recipe. Adding a scent booster to suit your needs is a great idea. We use the essential oils as it reduces the amount of chemicals in the product but I like that you have made adjustments that make you happy with the end product. It is a personal choice to add whatever type of scent you like, if you even add a scent at all.
      Here’s to some happy laundry!

      Reply
  37. amber

    Can you use this on a cold water washing cycle?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Yes, Amber.
      This detergent can be used just like any other liquid detergent you would purchase at the store.

      Reply
  38. Diane

    I made this recipe and my detergent separated. It’s thick and white on top and clear and thin on the bottom.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      That’s normal. Just give it a good shake before you use it:)

      Reply
  39. Iris Hetrick

    Can you use a flavored Castile soap like the citrus blend? Thank you!

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Iris,
      Yes, you can use a scented Castile soap. You may then find that you will not need or want to use the optional essential oil.
      However, if you do add more scent, remember to coordinate your essential oil with the scent of the soap (citrus with citrus, floral with floral,….etc).
      Enjoy! 🙂

      Reply
  40. Jennifer Caldera

    Do you store in plastic? There’s no concern of any of the ingredients breaking down the material?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Jennifer,
      When I asked Anna about that she said: “You can if you like. I’ve stored in both glass and plastic. I currently store it in an old vinegar jug, so it’s plastic but also food safe. I’ve stored it in an old laundry detergent jug before too and a bleach jug would work. Other detergents are stored in these jugs and I’m not eating detergent so I’m not too worried about storing in these types of plastic jugs.”
      I hope that helps. 🙂

      Reply
      • Allyson Thomas

        Can I substitute the Borax for Oxi Clean free?

        Reply
        • Tish Painter

          Hi Allyson,
          Chemically, borax and Oxi-Clean work the same way. That being said, we have not tried to use it in this recipe.
          Anna’s goal with this particular recipe is to remove unnecessary chemicals and plastics from the environment as well be economical and do a good job cleaning. Oxi-Clean contains polymer which is a term often used to refer to plastic.
          But, as it works almost exactly the same way as borax, you are welcome to try it for yourself. We cannot guarantee that it will work exactly the same as what Anna describes here, but we would love to hear how it works for you if you choose to try it.

          Reply
  41. Eden

    Thanks for the recipe! Is the 1cup of the Castile soap diluted or undiluted?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Eden,
      The Castile soap is undiluted. (It’s diluted after you mix it with the rest of the ingredients:)

      Reply
      • Eden

        Thanks! <3

        Reply
        • Lexi

          Is this safe for babies clothes?

          Reply
          • Tish Painter

            I would think so Lexi. I know that Anna started making this recipe when her daughter was 2 years old and had no problems.
            Perhaps, if you are hesitant, you could test it on one piece of clothing and see if your baby has any kind of a reaction before washing all of his/her clothes.
            I would love to know what you think and how it works for you.

  42. Ursula Marin

    How do you use the laundry detergent if it congeals into a gel? My detergent congealed, but left a lot of water at the bottom? Should I mix it, or should I just use the gel mixture that floated to the top?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Ursula,
      That’s totally normal. Ours congeals all the time. I just shake the jug and it liquifies enough for me to pour some out. But you could also transfer it to a container with an opening big enough for you to scoop it out if that’s easier.

      Reply
      • Meg Burton

        Do you use this with a septic system?

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          Yes, we’re on septic.

          Reply
          • Cheryl M Shockley

            Just made this w Dr Bonners Almond Hemp Castille soap. I added 30 drops of black cherry, and it smells good enuf to eat, lol
            Mine is thickening up, but I’m ok with that.
            Washed a dark couch blanket w it, in COLD water, no residue and it smells so good, and is so clean.
            Thanks for this recipe!!@

          • Ashley Constance

            That sounds awesome, Cheryl! Glad you’re enjoying the recipe! -Ashley (assistant)

  43. Kristen

    I followed your recipe for detergent, but mine is runny and not thickening up at all? What did I do wrong?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Kristen,
      If you followed the recipe then you did nothing wrong. At the end Anna says that it may remain liquid or it may get thick as it cools which is mainly due to your room temperature or climate. It does not have any impact on the effectiveness of the product. Many store bought products are also liquid and have the advantage of being easy to measure out the amount you desire. 🙂
      I hope this helps.

      Reply
  44. Kelly

    I rarely hang clothes on the line to dry. I’m not sure if it’s because I truly don’t have the time or just because I’m too lazy. I wish I could get excited about it, but the dryer is just so fast and convenient sitting right there next to the washer just begging for those wet clothes to dry and give it a purpose in life. I just can’t say no.

    Reply
  45. Sabrina

    Hi! Just been reading and I’m going to give this a go, I do have one question tho. The recipe, how much detergent does it make? Thank you for clarifying, Sabrina

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Sabrina,
      Anna said that the recipe makes a little more than a gallon so she uses a 5 liter jug she found which works fine. If you don’t have one that large, you can mix it all in a larger container and pour into two smaller jugs for ease of use.

      Reply
  46. Tim L

    Like the Farmer said . Does anything ever go right ? Heard the guy say that on a farming show as I just came in the house from working on the broke down combine and getting ready to work on the broke down grain truck . I know the feeling .

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Tim,
      I have a feeling you’re responding to the email I sent out where I talked about crying in my coffee over my gardening struggles this year. You’re so right! If it’s not one thing it’s another. But we keep going anyway because this homesteading lifestyle is worth it. Thanks for the comment and the support! I assure you that at least this laundry detergent recipe has never failed me ?

      Reply
    • Melissa marcou

      As for the dryer balls that seems good and all, but several years ago I recall a woman sharing her recipes and saying she used an old wash rag just damp it and soap the living day lights out of it and through it it in the dryer. Well why not. I like it it’s just my clothes and I’m a woman I can pick Ann choose so I went to the local health barn and had a bottle of Jasmine and secrets mixed and well you know. It was costly. But worth it. Missy marcou

      Reply

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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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🫙 Our monthly live group coaching call, where you can ask questions and where I offer personalized help and guidance on your homesteading journey.

🌿 Exclusive bonuses: Get downloadable digital copies of my Home Canning Handbook and the annual edition of Modern Homesteading Magazine for free (regular $40 for both), as well as access to other bonuses, like my gardening and preserving masterclasses and bonus interviews with other top homesteaders.

I’m only offering this deal for a limited time, and after it’s over, the membership cost will be going up. But if you join now for $1 and decide you love it, you’ll still be able to continue with your membership for the introductory price of just $20/month (or $200/year).

However, if you decide The Society Of Self-Reliance just isn’t for you right now, you can cancel any time.

All you have to lose is $1, but what you have to gain is priceless:

—> Independence and self-reliance in all areas of life.
—> Security and confidence in your ability to provide for yourself and your loved ones in good times and bad.
—> Freedom from complete and total dependency on “the system”
—> Skills and knowledge you can pass down to the next generation.
—> Fellowship and community with other likeminded folks.

And so much more!

Comment “Society” below and I’ll send you the deets!
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Me shopping for Easter candy for my kids, and walking out empty handed because it’s all full of absolute garbage!

I don’t mind my kids having sugar now and again, but I draw the line at food dies, seed oils and artificial ingredients. (Or at least, I try!)

Hey, we’re not perfect, and yes, our kids will get Easter candy on Sunday morning. Ryan has already bought some and I’m sure he didn’t check all the ingredients like I do! I’m fine with the 80/20 rule most of the time. But the meta question here, is why are these types of ingredients allowed in foods to begin with? Especially food marketed toward kids!

Yes, it’s “junk food.” I don’t expect it to be HEALTHY. But it could be made better by omitting the known carcinogenic ingredients that have been linked to everything from ADHD to hormone imbalances to cancer!

Folks, we must demand better. We DESERVE better, and so do our kids.
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We said goodbye to a family pet yesterday. My mom has had Zoe since I was a teenager, and Evelyn has grown to love her during her visits with nanny.

It’s never easy to say goodbye to a family member, human or furry. But we don’t shelter our kids from death either. Evelyn was with us when we found our rabbits dead. She went with my mom to say goodbye to her other cat a year ago. And she knows where the chickens go when it’s their time.

Having a healthy relationship to death is important. It is, after all, the only certainty in life.

Today Ryan is heading down to clean out his dad’s place after he passed last week. They had a strained relationship, so our kids never knew him as their grandpa. But still, it’s never easy.

It does, however, teach us to be grateful for every day we’re alive, and to appreciate the ones we love while we’re still together, because you never know how much time you have left.

RIP Zozo ❤️ See you over the rainbow bridge 🌈 🐾
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When I first started homesteading, gardening, and trying to be more self-sufficient, I had no idea what I was doing. Everything was new to me, and I had no one in my life to teach me the ropes.

I’m not a second or third or fifth generation homesteader. I’m a born-and-raised city girl who had to figure it out on my own, using books from the library and resources from the internet, and advice from random strangers on social media.

While these free resources have taught me a lot, I’ve also come across lots of bad (or just wrong) advice online, and sadly, I’ve dealt with a jerk or two in the comments section of public Facebook groups.

Eventually I did invest in online mentorship and my success from there was exponential. Now, less than a decade after leaving the city in pursuit of our new life as homesteaders, I’ve not only learned how to grow an abundance of food and troubleshoot all kinds of plant issues to ensure a healthy crop and successful harvest, but I’ve learned how to be more self-sufficient in just about every area of life.

I’ve learned how to
🌱 grow my own groceries
🫙 can and preserve my own food
🌿 make herbal medicine and natural products
💵 create multiple income streams
🆘 prepare for a wide range of emergencies
and more.

Plus, with my husband’s help, he can also
🛠 fix or build most things
so together we’ve got a wide range of skills that allow us to live a more empowered, self-reliant life.

Now I want to help you do the same…

I recently reopened the doors to The Society of Self-Reliance—my private membership program where I teach you the skills and mindset you need to become more self-reliant in every area of your life.

Not only do you get access to nearly 150 step-by-step video tutorials (and counting), you also get monthly live group coaching calls with me, and access to a private, SUPPORTIVE and knowledgeable online community of likeminded folks on the same journey.

For a limited time, you can join The Society for just $20/month (or get two months FREE with an annual membership!).

Come, join a community of people who will lift you up and ensure you DON’T starve 😉

Comment “Society” below to learn more!
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Never before have we had access to so much information at our fingertips. Whether you have a question you need answered, are looking for a tutorial to walk you through a specific task or are searching for a recipe to help you figure out what to make for dinner, all you have to do is Google it.⁣

But the problem is that there's no real way to be sure whether the information you find on line is genuine. Is the person who wrote or shared it actually sharing their own experience, or are they too simply regurgitating answers that they Googled?⁣

As we barrel full speed ahead into the era of AI and deep fakes, it will be even more difficult to know whether the information you're getting is even from a real human!⁣

While it's definitely an exciting time to be alive, so many people are feeling overwhelmed, and are craving a return to the analog world; To a world where information was shared in the pages of trusted books and publications, or was passed on from human to human, from someone who held that knowledge not because they Googled it, but because they lived it, experienced it, even mastered it.⁣

That what sets Homestead Living magazine apart from much of the information you'll find online: We don't have staff writers, we have experienced homesteaders sharing their hard-won wisdom in each issue. And while we do offer a digital version, we're also now offering monthly PRINT issues for U.S. subscribers (Canada and elsewhere hopefully coming soon!)⁣

Plus, until the end. of January, you can get your first 12 issues of Homesteading Monthly for just $1.00!⁣

No matter where you are on your homesteading journey, if you've been feeling overwhelmed with the sheer volume of information and the noise of the online world and have been craving a return to the real, the tangible and, quite frankly, the human, Homesteading Monthly was made for you. ⁣

For homesteaders, by homesteaders.⁣

*** Comment "Homestead" below and I'll send you the link to subscribe! ***
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