Homemade Laundry Detergent Recipe


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This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachinesThe safety and efficacy of homemade laundry detergent is a very hotly debated topic. In fact, it’s up there with things like canning safety, and possibly religion and politics as well!

Many people claim that homemade laundry detergents are either bad for your clothes, bad for your washing machine, or both. I’ve read many articles that claim homemade laundry soaps and detergents either don’t work (ie. leave clothes looking and smelling dirty), have discoloured people’s clothes (leaving whites yellow and colours looking dull),  or left soap residue in the fibres of clothes.  Some say it even ruined their washing machines, specifically front loaders and HE washing machines.

Not to mention the many online sources that claim that if your washing machine goes on the fritz during your warranty period and you’ve been using homemade laundry detergent, your warranty will be void.

On top of all of that, borax -a common ingredient used in homemade laundry detergent- has been called into question for safety reasons, as it can be toxic and even deadly if ingested or used indicated on skin.

😱 No wonder making your own laundry detergent is such a controversial topic!

However, I’ve been making and using homemade laundry detergent for about 2½ years now and not only have I never had a problem with the recipe that I use, our clothes are as clean as ever, our brand new (as of three years ago) Electrolux-brand HE front loader washing machine still runs perfectly well and has no built up soap residue (although we do a vinegar rinse once every 50 loads or so… when our fancy washing machine reminds us that it’s time;).

Since we started making our own, we’ve easily saved a few hundred dollars on store-bought laundry detergent, which is honestly the biggest reason why we make our own at home.

I will say, most other recipes I’ve read call for grated bar soap, and this can definitely be a culprit for soap residue, so I’m thinking that the fact that I use liquid Castile soap in my recipe makes a big difference. I’ll talk more about ingredients in a minute, but keep that in mind… Do not substitute grated bar soap for liquid Castile soap, or liquid dish soap for that matter! You will not get the same results and I definitely wouldn’t use either of those ingredients in my own washing machine.

That being said, I’m going to share my recipe with you today, but as a disclaimer I will say you would be wise to check your warranty and do additional research if you’re worried at all about using homemade detergent in your machine. I can only share that this has worked perfectly well for us, and that we have never had a problem with this particular recipe.

I’ll tell you the exact recipe we use and the exact amount we add to each load, and I can say with certainty that we have never had a load come out of the washing machine smelling or looking dirty, and have never had a problem with soap residue gumming up our washing machine (or clothes). But I cannot be held responsible for any adverse results you may experience, just to be clear.

I’m just sharing what works for me and my family, and homemade laundry detergent is something I’ve been asked about multiple times over the years, so I figured now is as good a time as any to share my recipe and experience with you!

 

Related: Spring Cleaning Recipes With Essential Oils

 

How much does it cost to make your own laundry detergent at home?

I wish I was one of those Type-A women who kept meticulous track of everything in her budget and that I had an exact cost per load to share with you, but alas, I am not that woman! What I can say is that I used to use a brand of all-natural detergent called Nellie’s All-Natural, which cost somewhere between $20 and $30 a box for powdered detergent which was meant to last for 60 loads, and I usually had to purchase around 3 or 4 boxes of this detergent per year, which means I spent between $60 to $90 per year on laundry detergent. Keep in mind that I’m also Canadian, so this was in CAD.

When I switched to making my own laundry detergent, I spent about $60 on all of the ingredients up front, but those ingredients have now lasted us about 2½ years, and we still have some ingredients leftover. This works out to around $25 per year (a savings of $35 to $65 per year based on what I was spending before).

Not bad if you ask me! But again, this may also depend on where you live, your currency and how much the ingredients cost in your area (if purchasing them locally).

Regardless, homemade laundry detergent will save you money one way or another.

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

Is homemade laundry detergent all-natural?

Another reason why I prefer to make my own laundry detergent is because I’ve been on a years-long mission to eliminate synthetic fragrances and chemicals from our home. Store-bought detergents often contain an array of harmful synthetic chemicals including sulfates, synthetic surfactants, phenols and petroleum distillates to name a few. Not to the mention synthetic fragrances that are in most conventional laundry detergents. Those store-bought detergents that smell like “lavender,” “fresh cotton” or a “tropical sunset” are full of synthetic chemicals that stay in your clothes and can cause irritation. I’ve used detergents before where the smell was so strong that it gave me headaches. This concoction of chemicals can be absorbed by your skin as well. For this reason, I switched to an all-natural detergent a number of years ago, but like I said, it still easily cost me between $60 to $90 per year just to clean our clothes. So I decided to start making my own for a fraction of the price and haven’t bought laundry detergent since!

The homemade laundry detergent recipe below uses all natural ingredients, all of which are safe when handled and diluted correctly.

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

Ingredients in homemade laundry detergent

Different recipes for homemade laundry detergent call for different ingredients. Some of them call for grating a bar of soap. Some of them call for borax while others omit it, and some I’ve seen even call for using Dawn dish detergent (which I wouldn’t recommend due to the crazy amount of suds this can produce –and leak out of your machine– as well as the soap residue it can leave behind).

I also don’t recommend using grated bar soap as this can also leave behind lots of soapy residue, both in the fibres of your clothes and in your washing machine.

Instead, I use Dr. Bronner’s liquid Castile soap, and I’ve never had a problem with soapy residue. 

I also use Arm & Hammer brand washing soda, which is similar to baking soda, but has a slightly different chemical makeup which is much more alkaline than baking soda. Washing soda is an 11 on the PH scale whereas baking soda is an 8. The high alkalinity of washing soda makes it a more effective stain remover than baking soda, which is an essential component of a good laundry detergent.

And finally, I do use borax in my laundry detergent, which I’ll touch on in more detail in just a moment.

Borax is also a very alkaline substance (around 9.5 to 10 on the PH scale). Once again, this is what makes borax an effective stain remover, just like washing soda. But this high alkalinity means that even though both of these ingredients are natural, they must be handled with caution and you should avoid touching them with bare skin. This is very similar to using lye in homemade soap: There’s nothing inherently dangerous about making homemade soap or using lye (which is even higher in alkalinity at about 14 on the PH scale), but if handled with bare hands, it can irritate or even burn skin.

Personally we don’t use gloves when making our homemade laundry detergent, but if you want to play it safe then gloves couldn’t hurt.

Otherwise, I do like to add some essential oils to my laundry detergent for a nice scent, but this part is totally optional. Sometimes I omit the oils and just add a few drops of essential oils to my wool dryer balls to add a little fresh scent to my clothing in the dryer.

 

What is borax?

Borax is a natural boron compound that is mined from mineral deposits that (from the research I’ve done) were left behind from hot springs in places like Death Valley. In fact, according to popular borax brand 20 Mule Team Borax, “U.S. Borax traces its roots to California’s Death Valley, where borate deposits were discovered in 1872. The first 20 mule team hauled borax a sweeping 165 miles through Death Valley in 1883.”

According to the Death Valley Natural History Association website, “borax belongs to a group of boron minerals called borates resembling quartz crystals, fibrous cotton balls or earthy white powders. They originated in hot springs or vapors associated with the outpouring of volcanic rocks such as the colorful formations of Artists Drive. Seeping groundwater formed glassy borate veins in the extinct lake beds of Furnace Creek and has moved soluble borates to modern salt flats such as the floor of Death Valley. There, evaporation has left a mixed white crust of salt, borax, and alkalies.”

While borax is a natural substance, it can be dangerous if ingested and can cause skin rashes, eye irritation, nausea and, if ingested, it can even cause death! But then again, so can bleach.

Borax has also been used as an effective detergent in laundry rooms across North America for decades. The first box I got was from my grandma who used to use it to do her laundry. While it must absolutely be handled with care and caution and kept out of reach of children (we keep ours high up on top of our standing freezer by our washing machine), borax is perfectly safe to use diluted in homemade laundry detergent. 

So, now that we’ve got all of those disclaimers and cautionary tales out of the way, let’s move on to the recipe.

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

How to make your own liquid laundry detergent

To make your own liquid laundry detergent, start by bringing 8 cups of water to a boil.

While your water is boiling, add one cup of borax and one cup of washing soda to a large jug or bucket. I find that a gallon jar is just a little bit too small for this recipe, so if possible use something a little bit larger. We use an old 5 litre vinegar jug and just mix everything in there.

Once you’ve added the borax and washing soda, add one cup of liquid Castile soap, then add 8 cups of boiling water and mix it well to dissolve all the ingredients. (If using a jug, I find it’s useful to use a tea towel or oven mitts to hold the jug and shake it up as the boiling water will make it quite hot).

When it’s well mixed and the ingredients have fully dissolved, add another 8 cups of cold water and mix again.

At this point, you can add some essential oils if you like. I like to use either lavender or Plant Therapy’s Deodorizing Blend. I know moms people who suggest lemon essential oil, but I don’t risk using lemon oil as it has the potential to stain your clothes. Plant Therapy also has their own set of laundry blends if you wanna mix it up!

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

If using essential oils, I like to add about 50 drops and then mix all of the ingredients together one more time.

Let your laundry detergent sit until it cools to room temperature. It will likely start to congeal to a thick white consistency.

To use, add about ¼ cup of laundry detergent to each load. We have a pre-measured ¼ cup scoop that we use to measure out our detergent, although in all honesty, I’ve been free pouring for about the past 6 months or so.

Do be careful not to add too much though as I’ve read that this can cause the issue of soapy residue!

 

How I dry my clothes

As a self-proclaimed “homesteader,” I feel like I’m expected to line dry my laundry and love the feel of crisp cotton on my skin, but in all honesty, I don’t. I might start line drying our laundry someday, but I’ll still probably throw it in to the dryer for a quick refresh to soften it up. that being said, I don’t like using dryer sheets for the same reasons I don’t like using conventional laundry detergent: They’re expensive, full of synthetic chemicals and can be harmful to our own health and to the environment.

But I also hate static cling, so I opt for using wool dryer balls instead.

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

I’ve been using dryer balls for longer than I’ve been making my own laundry detergent for, and they work just as well as dryer sheets but are 100% natural and can be reused over and over again.

Personally, I like to add a few drops of essential oils to my dryer balls before I toss them in with our laundry. HOWEVER, a reader recently informed me that adding essential oils to dryer balls has been linked to dryer fires as the oils can hit their flashpoint in a hot dryer and ignite! So I would definitely caution against this. The dryer balls on their own, however, are definitely worth the small investment up front as they will last for a very long time.

And that’s all you need for your natural homemade laundry routine!

Tell me, what does your laundry care routine look like? Do you line dry your clothes or do you prefer the dryer? Let me know in the comments below:)

 

This homemade laundry detergent recipe uses just a handful of natural ingredients and is suitable for front loading and HE washing machines. Learn how to make your own liquid laundry detergent at home for a fraction of the price of store-bought detergents! #homemadelaundrydetergent #liquidlaundrydetergent #laundrydetergentforhewashingmachines

Homemade Laundry Detergent Recipe

Yield: 1 GALLON plus a bit more

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Bring 8 cups of water to a boil. While your water is boiling, add one cup of borax and one cup of washing soda to a large jug or bucket. Mix well.
  2. Add one cup of liquid Castile soap, then add the 8 cups of boiling water and mix it well to dissolve all the ingredients.
  3. Once it’s well mixed and the ingredients have fully dissolved, add another 8 cups of cold water and mix again.
  4. At this point, you can add some essential oils if you like. If using essential oils, I like to add about 50 drops and then mix all of the ingredients together one more time.

  5. Let your laundry detergent sit until it cools to room temperature. Depending on the temperature, it may remain liquid or it may congeal to a thick white consistency.
 To use, add about ¼ cup of laundry detergent to each load.

 


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

64 Comments

  1. Susan Mendoza

    I did my first load with this recipe. My whites look really dingy after and I did a second rinse. Did I do something wrong when I made it?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Susan,
      So sorry you’ve had this issue. I haven’t had a problem before unless clothes were really stained or dirty (I usually do a pre-soak if they’re quite bad). If you followed the recipe I can’t see what you would have done wrong. It’s possible that if you’re used to using a standard store-bought detergent that the clothes aren’t quite as bright white as you’re used to. But they shouldn’t be dingy.

      Reply
  2. Virginie

    Good recipe, thank you.
    About the toxicity of borax, you might want to read the following article. Borax can be taken as a health supplement! I had no idea either.

    Reply
  3. Jenny

    I made the recipe (in a hurry late at night) and I forgot the cold water step. Now it’s a hard substance in my bucket. Is there any way so salvage it now? I’d hate to waste all those ingredients!

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Jenny,
      I would maybe try adding some hot water to soften it up and then let it cool down. Maybe start with half the amount of water but make it boiling, then add the remaining cold water once it’s dissolved and let cool. That’s what I would try. Let me know how it works out!

      Reply
  4. Ashton

    I live this recipe and plant therapy oils! So far the laundry detergent has been cleaning my clothes but after a couple of days in the bucket/container and it’s chunky like gel. I have shaken and stirred. I used the recipe to the T. Is there anything I can do or anything I did wrong?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Ashton,
      It doesn’t sound like you did anything wrong. The consistency changes are normal. Ours also tends to gel. I just shake before each use to make sure it’s well combined as sometimes it likes to separate and it still works great and cleans our clothes well:)

      Reply
      • Ashton

        Thank you. I have a new washer and it seems to dissolve and not leave any build up.
        I shake and stir. Mine is pretty chunky and not really liquified underneath. I am loving the chemical free and enjoy your blog. Thank you.

        Reply
  5. Gloria

    Hi Anna, do you have a recipe for fabric softener for an HE washing machine?!?!

    Reply
    • Ashley Constance

      Hi Gloria – sorry, not at this time!

      Reply
    • Ashton P.

      I just made this yesterday. Already did a load and it was great. Was not worried about the thickness or bubbles after it was shook. Today it kinda looked chunky. Mixed it again and touched it and it was more like a gel I felt like would liquify. I have a HE too loader so it washes pretty well. Should still be ok if it’s chunking even after shaking right? It smells great. I actually got Castile soap that’s lavender sent. Plant Therapy oils are so nice!!! I plan on making more household cleaning products with it. Thank you for this recipe.

      Reply
  6. Rose

    Hi there, I am new to this and I fear I have done something wrong, I just made this liquid and once cooled I did a load of washing but it has come out with undissolved mixture on it. Can I re-boil the entire mixture to try dissolve it better or will I have to start again? Thank you

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Rose,
      If you are ending up with residue on your clothes you may just be using too much. Also, if you are adding the detergent directly into the tub of your machine rather than a soap dispenser, you may want to try putting it in the machine first and then putting your laundry in on top.

      Reply
      • Rose

        Thank you I will try adding less. I have a front loader so put liquid into the dispenser. I also had particles stuck in the rubber ring. I will see how I go using less next time. Would it be ok to re boil the mixture again incase I haven’t dissolved it properly the first time?

        Reply
        • Jamie Pearson

          Hi Rose,
          Anna would not recommend reboiling the finished product, but you could try adding a bit more boiling water and giving it a good shake before you do another load. If this still doesn’t work then you may have to start from scratch.

          Reply
  7. Breanna

    Hi there! Thank you for all of your details. Do you put the detergent in the container in the washer as normal, or do you put it right in the washer?

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Breanna,

      Anna puts the detergent in the container but you could try it directly in the washer if that is your preference. I would suggest putting it in first and then putting the clothes in on top.

      Reply
      • Lee

        I just made this and mine came out watery and I followed the directions to a tee. Is it supposed to be? Most laundry soaps I’ve used are a little thicker.

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          Hi Lee,
          It usually tends to thicken up as it cools. I actually noticed my latest batch was more watery than usual too so it could be the warmer temperatures as we head into summer. But typically it does thicken up and is not as liquidy. Either way it will still work fine. Just give it a good shake before using.

          Reply
    • Saidah

      Greetings, thank you for the recipe, I am looking forward to trying it! I’m wondering if adding vinegar in the final or separate/extra rinse would have an adverse effect on the laundry? Does anyone know? I believe that castille and vinegar are not good combinations together. Although the soap should be rinsed away, there maybe traces remaining.

      Reply
      • Jamie Pearson

        Hi Saidah,
        The issue with mixing Castile soap and vinegar is that they render each other ineffective, and the Castile will separate and become oily.
        Anna does not use vinegar with her laundry, but she will add it to a machine cleaning cycle every 40 or 50 loads.

        Reply
        • Saidah

          Thank you.

          Reply
  8. Lindsey

    How can I adapt the recipe so that it stays liquid consistency?

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Lindsay,

      A varied consistency tends to be the nature of the recipe. It is affected by temperature and will stay more liquid if you keep it warm.

      Reply
  9. Leena D.

    Hi there, I made this laundry soap today. Before it even was cooled completely it separated. Liquid on the bottom and thick and foamy on the top. What went wrong? Can I still use it in a front load washer?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Leena,
      It’s very common for it to separate, especially as it’s cooling. Just give it a good shake before you use it and it should be fine:)

      Reply
    • Cynthia Sicola

      How long does it take to gel? Mines at room temp but it’s still liquid.

      Reply
      • Jamie Pearson

        Hi Cynthia,

        The consistency of the laundry soap can range from quite liquid to fairly solid, but neither state will effect the performance. We recommend that you just give it a shake before each use.

        Reply
  10. Joice

    Can this detergent be used to wash laundry by hand?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Joice,
      I would be cautious using this detergent to wash clothes by hand as it contains Borax and Borax can irritate skin if it comes in direct contact. That being said, I have used it to wash clothes by hand before and I’ve been fine. You might want to wear gloves (ie. dish washing gloves) just in case.

      Reply
  11. Celeste

    What could I use instead of the soap?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Celeste,
      In this recipe you have to have some kind of soap for it to clean properly. Anna uses this brand of soap because it has no synthetics in it and is gentle while being effective. If you do not have this brand available to you, then perhaps you can use another similar soap for this particular recipe? Anna prefers the liquid over the solid type as it seems to reduce any residue left behind – as she has experienced.
      We can not guarantee, if you do choose to substitute the soap, that your results will be exactly the same as Anna’s (because we haven’t tried any other substitutions for this ingredient) but you are welcome to try something else. We would love to know how it works for you, if you do. 🙂

      Reply
  12. michael zandri

    hi Anna….sounds great and can’t wait to get started on my first batch.

    Do you have a recipe for an All Purpose Cleaner that be be put into a spray bottle?

    Thanks,

    Reply
  13. Mary Johnson

    Love this recipe. I have been making my own laundry detergent for over a year. Your recipe is so much simpler than the one I had. I did have trouble when I mixed the borax, washing soda and castle soap it made a hard ball; so I added the borax and washing soda first and then add the castle soap to the water. It desolved fast. In the store laundry isle they now have scent booster to add to the wash, I used that instead of essential oils and it is much cheaper.

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      That sounds great, Mary.
      I’m glad you like our simple and easy recipe. Adding a scent booster to suit your needs is a great idea. We use the essential oils as it reduces the amount of chemicals in the product but I like that you have made adjustments that make you happy with the end product. It is a personal choice to add whatever type of scent you like, if you even add a scent at all.
      Here’s to some happy laundry!

      Reply
  14. amber

    Can you use this on a cold water washing cycle?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Yes, Amber.
      This detergent can be used just like any other liquid detergent you would purchase at the store.

      Reply
  15. Diane

    I made this recipe and my detergent separated. It’s thick and white on top and clear and thin on the bottom.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      That’s normal. Just give it a good shake before you use it:)

      Reply
  16. Iris Hetrick

    Can you use a flavored Castile soap like the citrus blend? Thank you!

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Iris,
      Yes, you can use a scented Castile soap. You may then find that you will not need or want to use the optional essential oil.
      However, if you do add more scent, remember to coordinate your essential oil with the scent of the soap (citrus with citrus, floral with floral,….etc).
      Enjoy! 🙂

      Reply
  17. Jennifer Caldera

    Do you store in plastic? There’s no concern of any of the ingredients breaking down the material?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Jennifer,
      When I asked Anna about that she said: “You can if you like. I’ve stored in both glass and plastic. I currently store it in an old vinegar jug, so it’s plastic but also food safe. I’ve stored it in an old laundry detergent jug before too and a bleach jug would work. Other detergents are stored in these jugs and I’m not eating detergent so I’m not too worried about storing in these types of plastic jugs.”
      I hope that helps. 🙂

      Reply
      • Allyson Thomas

        Can I substitute the Borax for Oxi Clean free?

        Reply
        • Tish Painter

          Hi Allyson,
          Chemically, borax and Oxi-Clean work the same way. That being said, we have not tried to use it in this recipe.
          Anna’s goal with this particular recipe is to remove unnecessary chemicals and plastics from the environment as well be economical and do a good job cleaning. Oxi-Clean contains polymer which is a term often used to refer to plastic.
          But, as it works almost exactly the same way as borax, you are welcome to try it for yourself. We cannot guarantee that it will work exactly the same as what Anna describes here, but we would love to hear how it works for you if you choose to try it.

          Reply
  18. Eden

    Thanks for the recipe! Is the 1cup of the Castile soap diluted or undiluted?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Eden,
      The Castile soap is undiluted. (It’s diluted after you mix it with the rest of the ingredients:)

      Reply
      • Eden

        Thanks! <3

        Reply
        • Lexi

          Is this safe for babies clothes?

          Reply
          • Tish Painter

            I would think so Lexi. I know that Anna started making this recipe when her daughter was 2 years old and had no problems.
            Perhaps, if you are hesitant, you could test it on one piece of clothing and see if your baby has any kind of a reaction before washing all of his/her clothes.
            I would love to know what you think and how it works for you.

  19. Ursula Marin

    How do you use the laundry detergent if it congeals into a gel? My detergent congealed, but left a lot of water at the bottom? Should I mix it, or should I just use the gel mixture that floated to the top?

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Ursula,
      That’s totally normal. Ours congeals all the time. I just shake the jug and it liquifies enough for me to pour some out. But you could also transfer it to a container with an opening big enough for you to scoop it out if that’s easier.

      Reply
      • Meg Burton

        Do you use this with a septic system?

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          Yes, we’re on septic.

          Reply
  20. Kristen

    I followed your recipe for detergent, but mine is runny and not thickening up at all? What did I do wrong?

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Kristen,
      If you followed the recipe then you did nothing wrong. At the end Anna says that it may remain liquid or it may get thick as it cools which is mainly due to your room temperature or climate. It does not have any impact on the effectiveness of the product. Many store bought products are also liquid and have the advantage of being easy to measure out the amount you desire. 🙂
      I hope this helps.

      Reply
  21. Kelly

    I rarely hang clothes on the line to dry. I’m not sure if it’s because I truly don’t have the time or just because I’m too lazy. I wish I could get excited about it, but the dryer is just so fast and convenient sitting right there next to the washer just begging for those wet clothes to dry and give it a purpose in life. I just can’t say no.

    Reply
  22. Sabrina

    Hi! Just been reading and I’m going to give this a go, I do have one question tho. The recipe, how much detergent does it make? Thank you for clarifying, Sabrina

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Sabrina,
      Anna said that the recipe makes a little more than a gallon so she uses a 5 liter jug she found which works fine. If you don’t have one that large, you can mix it all in a larger container and pour into two smaller jugs for ease of use.

      Reply
  23. Tim L

    Like the Farmer said . Does anything ever go right ? Heard the guy say that on a farming show as I just came in the house from working on the broke down combine and getting ready to work on the broke down grain truck . I know the feeling .

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Hi Tim,
      I have a feeling you’re responding to the email I sent out where I talked about crying in my coffee over my gardening struggles this year. You’re so right! If it’s not one thing it’s another. But we keep going anyway because this homesteading lifestyle is worth it. Thanks for the comment and the support! I assure you that at least this laundry detergent recipe has never failed me 😉

      Reply
    • Melissa marcou

      As for the dryer balls that seems good and all, but several years ago I recall a woman sharing her recipes and saying she used an old wash rag just damp it and soap the living day lights out of it and through it it in the dryer. Well why not. I like it it’s just my clothes and I’m a woman I can pick Ann choose so I went to the local health barn and had a bottle of Jasmine and secrets mixed and well you know. It was costly. But worth it. Missy marcou

      Reply

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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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11 Frugal Ways to Use Kitchen Scraps

11 Frugal Ways to Use Kitchen Scraps

 Save money, reduce food waste and and improve everything from your soil to your gut health with this list of 11 frugal ways to use kitchen scraps in your home and garden. *** We’re such a wasteful society, especially here in the west. The mounds of waste...

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It’s October, and that means pumpkin spice season is officially here 🎃

This year, instead of spending $5 or more on a PSL loaded with questionable artificial ingredients, why not make your own pumpkin spice syrup at home with REAL PUMPKIN and all-natural ingredients!

All you need is some puréed pumpkin (I make mine with fresh pumpkins, but you can use canned), some brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, ground cloves, allspice and ginger, a splash of vanilla extract and some water.

Bring everything to a boil and then simmer and reduce. Strain into a bottle or Mason jar and store in the fridge for up to a week or so.

Add a tablespoon or 2 of this syrup to your coffee or homemade latte for a better quality, better tasting PSL for a fraction of the cost of what you’d pay at a coffee shop.

You can also add this syrup to homemade kombucha, or drizzle it over pancakes, waffles, French toast or even ice cream!

Grab the full recipe via the link in my bio @anna.sakawsky or go to https://thehouseandhomestead.com/homemade-pumpkin-spice-syrup/

#pumpkinspice #psl #homemadetastesbetter #falldrinks
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Do you dream of escaping the rat race and starting a homestead far from the chaos of the modern world?

It’s no surprise that in this day and age, more and more people are ready to leave it all behind and move to a property in the country where they can grow their own food, live a simpler life and become more self-sufficient and less dependent on “the system.” But as romantic as it sounds, it’s definitely easier said than done.

In the latest issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, I sat down with Ann Accetta-Scott of @afarmgirlinthemaking to talk all about what people need to know about buying and selling a homestead property.

Ann and her husband Justin recently moved from their two-acre homestead outside of Seattle, Washington to a 40-acre homestead in rural Tennessee. Ann and I sat down to talk about the realities of buying and selling a homestead, moving across the country to pursue your homesteading dream, what to look for when you’re searching for your next property, pitfalls to avoid (if you can!), and what you can do if you’re not ready or in a position to make your move just yet.

Whether you’re looking to purchase your first homestead or trying to sell an existing homestead and upgrade to a bigger property, Ann had some great insights to share that can save you time, stress and money when you’re ready to make your move.

Check out the full interview in the fall issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine: link in bio @anna.sakawsky or visit www.modernhomesteadingmagazine.com to subscribe, login to the library (if you’re already a subscriber) or view a sample of the current issue!

#modernhomesteading #homesteadersofinstagram #escapethematrix #selfsufficiency #selfreliance #selfsufficientliving
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This is why people don’t trust our medical system!!!

I very rarely go on a rant about current events but this has me feeling really fired up…

My husband and I each got an Amber Alert on our phones the other night along with millions of other British Columbians, informing us of a child abduction in Vancouver. It made the suspect sound like a dangerous kidnapper and said “do not approach. Call 911.”

As it turns out, it was the mother of the child (a 3-year-old boy), who had refused medical treatment without getting a second opinion and follow up blood tests, so the Ministry of Child and Family Services was called, she was arrested and her son was taken from her and was administered medical treatment in the hospital without consent and without a guardian present.

There’s a lot more to this story than I’m able to share in this video or this caption, so I’ll post some links below where you can hear directly from the mom what happened, and check out other IG accounts that have been in direct contact with her and the father. But the point is this was a GROSS misuse of our Amber Alert system, a GROSS abuse of power (turns out the boy wasn’t sick in the end anyway), and has now traumatized this family for life.

Doctors are not gods and as mothers we do not co-parent with the government!!!

This hits close to home for me because I too have been through the medical system and had my concerns dismissed, was misdiagnosed and given wrong information, and was treated with obvious contempt when I got a second opinion.

In this day and age of rampant medical coercion and the erosion of bodily autonomy over our own bodies and over those of our children, this story highlights the dangers of the very slippery slope we’re on.

As parents who only have the best interests of our children at heart, this could happen to any one of us. We can’t let this be normalized. Remember “first they came for (fill in the blank), and I said nothing. Then they came for me and there was no one left to speak for me.”

Check out my stories for the full video that the mom, Wiloh made explaining the details of what happened or check out the comments for links to learn more & support this family.
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I’ve hesitated about posting this reel over and over because I know I’ll probably get backlash, hate and vitriol from some people in return. But I wouldn’t be being true to myself if I didn’t speak the truth that’s on my heart and mind…

If you haven’t noticed, there are currently thousands of Canadians sharing their stories and using the hashtag #trudeaumustgo on their social media posts right now in response to the divisive rhetoric and actions of our prime minister over the past few months. But our media has downplayed the issue and has attributed most of the hashtags to “bot” accounts and foreigners trying to influence our politics.

In response, real Canadians are making videos and sharing their stories to show that we are not bots, but real people who have been negatively affected by the words and actions of our leaders, particularly our leader at the top.

I used to consider myself a lifelong leftist and have supported the liberal government and Trudeau over the years, but after what I’ve witnessed over the past few months; After how he has spoken about Canadians who have made a different medical choice or who have protested mandates (which have done nothing to stop the spread of you-know-what anyway); After the hate and division that has trickled down from the top and infiltrated our communities, I can no longer stand silently by.

While I am 💉, a few months ago when I voiced my support for those who stood up against mandates and against the division being pushed on us by our leadership, I suddenly found myself among what our prime minister called the “small fringe minority” of citizens with “unacceptable views.”

I lost followers, friends and even a couple family members. I was told I’d been “radicalized,” although my views have never changed.

So today I’m adding my voice to the chorus of real, everyday Canadians who are taking a stand against tyranny and division in this country. As the saying goes, if we do not stand for something, we’ll fall for anything. I stand for freedom & autonomy, and against division & tyranny.

#trudeaumustgo

(Special thanks to fellow 🇨🇦 homesteader @meggarlandd for inspiring me & giving me the courage to post this:)
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What would you do if the grid went down?

Imagine not just the lights going out, but all power, all digital communication and information. Would you be prepared?

A lot of us THINK we’re prepared for a grid down situation, but unless you’re already living off grid, you might not realize how dependent on technology we really are!

In the fall issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, contributor Ashley Constance of @dirtypawshomestead and @alittleselfreliant shares her experience voluntarily going without power for the day, and what she and her husband, Shawn learned from their grid down experiment.

You might be surprised at the things they discovered and missed on their prep list, and it might prompt you to reevaluate whether you’re ready in case the grid goes down, or even just Google 😱

Check out the full story in the latest issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine!

Link in bio @anna.sakawsky or visit www.modernhomesteadingmagazine.com

#modernhomesteadingmagazine #homesteadersofinstagram #homesteading #modernhomesteading #prepping #nationalpreparednessmonth
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The other day when I had a few minutes to spare, I was out in the garden doing a little work when my neighbour said hi over the fence.

I lamented to her about how busy we’ve been and how hard it’s been to keep on top of this year. Very sincerely, she replied “wait until you have another one,” referring to our baby on the way.

“You’ll be moving back to the suburbs so quick, mark my words,” she said.

Now, I don’t for a second think there was any ill intent behind her statement, but still, it took me aback.

“We’ll never move back to the city or the suburbs,” I replied with a laugh. “This may be hard work but we love it.”

She then repeated her statement and followed it up with “just you wait and see.”

I decided not to continue the back and forth. After all, I told myself, it doesn’t matter if she or anyone else knows what’s truly in your heart. It doesn’t matter if she understands that there’s no amount of difficulty that would make me run back to the suburbs and leave this life behind. In fact, our dream is to upgrade to a bigger property someday where we can grow an even bigger garden and add more livestock to our homestead!

Likewise, I visited the city last weekend for a family event and as always, I had at least a couple people ask me “so when are you moving back to the city?”

Seven years later, and still we have friends and family members who think this is just a phase we’re going through, and eventually we’ll come to our senses and move back.

I used to get offended by these questions because I felt unseen; I felt like nobody took this life that I’m so passionate about seriously, and thought it was “cute” that I was “playing farmer” for a bit, but eventually I had to grow up and become part of the “real world” once again.

Now I just smile and reply “never:)”

Can you relate? How do you (politely) respond when someone questions your lifestyle choices or implies that you’ll eventually come to your senses and come back to “reality”?

Let me know below 👇
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The fall issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine just dropped!

In this issue you’ll find:

• Preparedness tips, tricks and advice to help you be ready for anything on the homestead (and in life!)
•The ultimate guide to growing garlic at home and it as both food and medicine
• Drool-worthy recipes that feature garlic as the star!
• Expert advice from A Farmgirl in the Making’s Ann Accetta-Scott on what to look for (and look out for) when buying or selling a homestead property
• Advice on how to learn and grow from perceived homesteading “failures”

And more!!!

Go to modernhomesteadingmagazine.com or click the link in my bio @anna.sakawsky to subscribe or login to the library and read the latest issue if you’re already subscribed!
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When I first started homesteading, I had a burning desire to become more self-sufficient and live a more sustainable life.

Ever since I can remember, I’ve been a rebel at heart, and learning how to homestead and become more self-reliant was a way for me to “throw a proverbial middle finger to the system” and live life on my own terms.

As a teenager, I was the girl who drove around town with punk rock music blaring from my car, Misfits sticker on the back and studs around my wrists. I felt misunderstood and angsty and like I desperately didn’t fit in with the world I grew up in.

I always knew in my soul that I wanted something different; Something more.

Today I’m the mama with stretch marks on my belly and battle scars on my heart. I’m the woman who gardens and cans food and makes her own tinctures and believes in something greater than herself and fights every day to stay free in a world that feels increasingly engineered to keep us hopelessly dependent.

Today I feel whole and at peace, and connected to a higher power and a higher purpose. I feel like I’ve finally found the place where I belong.

This journey has been about so much more than homesteading for me, and I've learned, lost, gained and loved so much more than I ever could have imagined.

Because, as I've said before, homesteading doesn't happen in a vacuum. Life is always happening at the same time.

This is the full, raw and unfiltered story of my homesteading journey, and how I've gained so much more than a pantry full of food along the way.

Click the link in my bio @anna.sakawsky to read more or check it out here >> https://thehouseandhomestead.com/how-it-started-how-its-going
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The news we’ve all been waiting for…

IT’S A BOY!!!

After so many years and too many losses, our hearts are so full and it feels like we are inching closer to our family finally being complete.

I’ve always known in my heart and soul that we were meant to have a girl and a boy. I know, it sounds cliché and very “nuclear family,” but years ago I saw a psychic who told me I would have a girl who loved to be centre stage and had a personality larger than life, very much how our daughter has turned out!

She also said I would have a boy who would be much more introverted and in tune with nature and with his own intuition. That’s yet to be seen, but I’ve always had this unwavering vision of a son and a daughter that fit these descriptions, and my heart has been set on a son ever since we had Evelyn.

Of course, things went sideways for a few years. Shortly after Evelyn was born, I became pregnant again, but we made the heartbreaking decision to terminate that pregnancy at 24 weeks due to a severe medical diagnosis. We lost our son, Phoenix Rain on June 15, 2018. Our hearts were shattered and have never fully healed.

Over the next few years, I had 3 more early miscarriages. None of the doctors knew what was causing them as most didn’t seem to have any sort of genetic explanation. We were told it was “something environmental,” but weren’t given any clues as to what that could be.

After pushing to see several specialists last year (after our most recent loss), and being told once again that there was “nothing wrong with me,” I finally got another opinion and found out I had something called Chronic Endometritis: A low-grade infection in my uterus that I believe in my heart was caused by my c-section with our daughter; A c-section I didn’t want and probably didn’t need, but felt I needed because I was under pressure to make a decision before the surgeon went off duty.

I’ll never know for sure, but when I pushed for more testing and finally got a simple round of antibiotics, the endometritis cleared up. I got pregnant again almost immediately and so far we now have a healthy baby boy on the way.

(Continued in comments…)
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We’re living through interesting times. Many people have even used the term “unprecedented times,” and while that may be true in that there has perhaps never been another time in history when we’ve faced so many existential threats all at once (ie. a global pandemic, climate change, political divisions, AI advancing at an incredible rate, cyber attacks, nuclear threats, globalization, food shortages, supply chain issues, hyperinflation, social media and the age of information/misinformation, etc. etc. all converging at once). But despite all of this, we are not the first generation(s) of humans to face hardships and threats of great magnitude, and in fact we’ve had it better than any other previous generations for most of our lives, especially here in the west.

The fact is, there are lots of things we can do to ensure we’re not sitting ducks when these threats come knocking at our door. But it takes action on our part, not waiting around for someone else to fix things or take care of us.

In the Summer issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, I sat down with The Grow Network’s Marjory Wildcraft to talk all about the realities of our current climate, including worsening inflation and looming global food shortages, as well as what every day people like you and I can actually DO to improve our food security, become more self-sufficient, care for our families and communities and ensure our own survival and wellbeing even in difficult and uncertain times like these.

While I don’t believe in fear mongering, I do believe in acknowledging hard truths and not burying your head in the sand. That being said, things may very well get worse before they get better, and we would all do well to start learning the necessary skills, stocking up on essential resources and preparing now while there’s still time.

Check out the full interview in the summer issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine. Link in bio @anna.sakawsky to subscribe or go to www.modernhomesteadingmagazine.com to subscribe or login and read the current issue.

#foodshortages #selfsufficiency #selfreliance #foodsecurity #foodsecurityisfreedom #homesteading #growyourownfood #fightinflation #stayfree
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If you’re like most homesteaders, you probably have a pile of scrap materials laying somewhere on your property, all with the “intention” of being resourceful and using those scrap pieces for future projects. And let’s be honest: With inflation and the cost of lumber and, well, pretty much everything these days, being resourceful with our scraps isn’t just practical, it’s downright necessary in many cases!

But the reality is that it’s often much easier to accumulate scrap pieces than it is to actually put them to good use, and if we’re not careful and discerning with what we keep on hand, that scrap pile full of homesteader gold can quickly turn into a junk pile of clutter taking up space on our property.

In the Summer issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, our resident handyman (my dear husband @ryan.sakawsky ;) shares his best tips for how to put your scrap pile to good use and knock some projects off your list while the weather’s still good, including which materials are worth saving and which ones aren’t.

If you haven’t had a chance to check out the summer issue yet, you can subscribe via the link in my bio @anna.sakawsky (or login to the library if you’re a already a subscriber) or go to www.modernhomesteadingmagazine.com

Do you keep a scrap pile? If so, what sort of materials do you have laying around?

#scrappile #modernhomesteading #homesteading #diy #getscrappy #resourcefulness #inflation #beatinflation
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