Easy Fermented Jalapeños Recipe


* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.

 

These easy fermented jalapeños are a great way to add a little spicy heat to any dish along with a healthy dose of probiotics. And all you need are three simple ingredients: water, salt and fresh jalapeños!When we first started growing jalapeños, we did so with the intention of using them to make homemade salsa. We figured we’d be lucky to get enough jalapeños to make all of our salsa for the year, especially since we’d tried growing sweet red peppers before without much luck (the plants only grew about 3 or 4 peppers each).

But as it turns out, jalapeños are much more prolific than sweet peppers –at least in our garden– so we ended up with more than we needed.

Of course we didn’t want to waste them, and we were in the thick of canning season, so we didn’t really want to add yet another canning project to our list. 

 

Enter fermentation…

I decided to ferment the extra jalapeños for a few practical reasons:

Reason #1: Fermenting vegetables is super quick and easy

Reason #2: Fermented foods are the most nutritious foods you can eat 

Reason #3: I’ve always loved pickled jalapeños; I find that the flavour intensifies while the spice mellows just enough to make these spicy little peppers even more delicious than if you were to cook them or eat them raw or as part of a salsa.

In the end, we were not disappointed (we being my husband and I… These are still much too hot for our 5-year-old).

In fact, fermented jalapeños have quickly become one of our favourite fermented foods, and one of my favourite ways to get my probiotics on a regular basis:)

 

What makes fermented foods so healthy

Fermented foods –vegetables in particular– are some of the most nutritious foods you can eat because not only are you getting all of the nutrition from the vegetables, you’re also getting a healthy dose of probiotics (aka. good bacteria) with every bite you eat.

These probiotics are incredibly good for your gut flora, and having a healthy gut teeming with beneficial bacteria is an essential part of maintaining overall health and a strong immune system.

These easy fermented jalapeños are a great way to add a little spicy heat to any dish along with a healthy dose of probiotics. And all you need are three simple ingredients: water, salt and fresh jalapeños!

 

How fermentation works

In a nutshell, fermentation occurs when beneficial microbes break down sugars and starches in foods and convert them into lactic acid (or, in certain cases, alcohol).

The process of fermentation captures wild yeasts and beneficial bacteria that are in the air and on the foods themselves. The microbes then produce carbon dioxide as they consume the sugars, which is what makes many fermented foods and beverages bubbly and carbonated. 

Get it? CARBONated, as in CARBON dioxide? Anybody else just have an “Aha!” moment? Just me??

In essence, fermentation is a natural process that occurs with or without human intervention. But over thousands of years, we’ve learned how to harness the power of fermentation to prepare and preserve all sorts of different foods that have helped shape not just the foods that we eat, but humanity and culture as we know it.

Think about it: Without fermentation, we would have never invented beer or wine or bread or cheese or pickles or yogurt or vinegar…

And we certainly wouldn’t have the fermented jalapeños recipe I’m about to share with you;)

These easy fermented jalapeños are a great way to add a little spicy heat to any dish along with a healthy dose of probiotics. And all you need are three simple ingredients: water, salt and fresh jalapeños!

 

How to make fermented jalapeños

Fermented jalapeños are so incredibly easy to make. All you need are the jalapeños themselves, along with some water and pure salt (sea salt, kosher salt or pickling salt).

Do not use table salt with iodine and/or anti-caking agents as these added chemicals can interfere with the fermentation process. 

This recipe makes one quart and calls for 3 cups of sliced jalapeños, one quart (4 cups) of water and two tablespoons of salt, but feel free to halve, double or multiply this recipe to make however many fermented jalapeños as your heart desires!

Start by bringing the water and salt to a simmer over medium heat. Stir until all of the salt has dissolved, then set the salt water aside and let cool while you slice the jalapeños.

Slice the jalapeños, being careful to protect your hands in the process (you might want to wear gloves or even use a plastic baggie to protect your hands as the capsaicin in the seeds can burn your skin if you’re in contact with them for too long).

Add all of the sliced jalapeños to a clean, quart-sized Mason jar and then cover with the salt brine once it’s cooled to room temperature (or slightly warmer). Weigh the jalapeños down using a fermentation weight (more on that in just a minute), and then place a fermentation lid or a coffee filter on top.

Let the jar sit out at room temperature for at least 5 to 7 days and up to 2 or 3 weeks, checking the flavour every few days until it’s to your liking.

Once you’re happy with the flavour, put a lid on the jar and store in cold storage or in the fridge for up to a year.

Technically you could store fermented jalapeños in the fridge for longer than a year and they would still be safe to eat, however the quality does start to degrade over time so they’re best eaten in the first few months after you make them.

These easy fermented jalapeños are a great way to add a little spicy heat to any dish along with a healthy dose of probiotics. And all you need are three simple ingredients: water, salt and fresh jalapeños!

 

How to keep fermented vegetables submerged in brine

Like all fermented vegetables, it’s important to keep these jalapeños submerged under the brine. If they’re exposed to air they could start to mold and go bad.

So long as they’re submerged beneath the brine, you’ve got nothing to worry about.

In order to keep them submerged, you’ll need something to weigh them down. In the past I’ve used smaller Mason jars (like the 4oz jars), as well as clean rocks to weigh my ferments down. But I recently decided to invest in some fermentation weights and by invest, I mean buck up $25– and I have to say they’re a game changer and I highly recommend them!

The ones I use are called pickle pebbles, and I love them because they fit the jars perfectly and weigh down my ferments effectively without any vegetables floating to the top.

Also, unlike using smaller Mason jars as weights, these don’t stick way out of the jar and prevent me from putting a lid or a coffee filter on top to keep the fruit flies out (although fruit flies tend to steer well clear of these spicy fermented jalapeños!)

I like to put coffee filters over any jars that I have fermenting on my counter. This keeps bugs and dust out while also allowing the ferment to breathe and expel excess carbo dioxide so it doesn’t build up too much.

So far the coffee filters have worked well, but at this point I’m fermenting enough to warrant investing in some fermentation lids soon. They’re as affordable as the fermentation weights and I can already tell they’ll be better than using coffee filters, although the filters work great in a pinch!

* You can save on both the pickle pebbles and fermentation lids by getting them bundled together right here.

These easy fermented jalapeños are a great way to add a little spicy heat to any dish along with a healthy dose of probiotics. And all you need are three simple ingredients: water, salt and fresh jalapeños!

 

How do I know the jalapeños are fermenting and not rotting?

Many people are afraid to try fermenting because they worry they’re going to do something wrong and make themselves or their family sick. Rest assured that it’s practically impossible to make anyone sick with fermented foods as fermented foods are full of good bacteria, which makes them safe by nature because the good bacteria keep the bad bacteria at bay.

In some cases ferments go wrong and you do end up with spoiled food. You’ll know right away if this is the case because the smell will typically be off-putting and there will likely be visible mold on top of the jar.

In most cases, if this happens simply skim off the mold and discard any moldy vegetables and everything else under the brine should be fine.

If you bit into a fermented vegetable and it tastes bad (like that earthy, moldy taste), you’ll also know your ferment has gone bad.

In any case, you’ll know right away if your ferment has gone bad and you won’t want to eat it. However, so long as you keep the jalapeños submerged beneath the brine you shouldn’t have any problem with mold.

You will notice the jalapeños begin to change colour from bright green to a more muted, olive green colour the longer they’re left to ferment. And the brine will turn cloudy and possibly have streaks of white in it. This is all totally normal and means the fermentation process is working.

 

How to use fermented jalapeños

There are so many ways to use fermented jalapeños! Try adding them to homemade nachos, tacos, chilli, pizza, salads, burgers and anything else you can think of that could benefit from a little spicy heat (and a healthy dose of probiotics;)

Whatever you do though, try not to cook them; The heat from cooking will destroy all of the healthy probiotics that make fermented foods so healthy to begin with. Instead, use them as a garnish or to top foods after cooking.

Or, if you really like heat, just grab a fork and eat some straight out of the jar! (But maybe keep a glass of milk on hand to cool your mouth down… just in case;)

These easy fermented jalapeños are a great way to add a little spicy heat to any dish along with a healthy dose of probiotics. And all you need are three simple ingredients: water, salt and fresh jalapeños!

Easy Fermented Jalapeños Recipe

Yield: 1 quart

Ingredients

  • 1 quart water
  • 3 cups jalapeños, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons salt (pure kosher, pickling or sea salt)

Instructions

  1. Add the water and salt to a small saucepan and bring it to a simmer over medium heat. Stir until salt is completely dissolved. Remove from heat and let cool.
  2. Slice the jalapeños into roughly ¼-inch thick rounds, leaving the seeds and pith intact. Add the sliced jalapeños to a clean Mason jar. Then, once the salt water brine has cooled, pour it over the jalapeños until they’re completely covered. (The brine should be room temperature or a little warmer but not hot!)
  3. Place a fermentation weight on top of the jalapeños to keep them submerged beneath the brine. Cover with a coffee filter or a fermentation lid and let the jar sit at room temperature for at least 5 to 7 days and up to 2 to three weeks. Taste it every few days until the flour is to your liking.
  4. Once you’re happy with the flavour, put a lid on the jar and transfer it to the fridge or to cold storage and store for up to a year.

P.S. Wanna learn more about fermenting? Get the August 2021 issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine (all about Fermentation) now! The September issue will be out soon, but you can still read the August issue for free when you subscribe, or become a member and get full access to our entire library of issues!

Wishing you homemade, homegrown, homestead happiness 🙂

 

 

 

 


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

4 Comments

  1. Tiffany

    Thanks for sharing! Question, my weights are not holding down some of the jalapeño seeds, is it safe for some seeds to float above the weight? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jamie Pearson

      Hi Tiffany,

      Fermenting is a very natural and safe process; however, you will find that anything that floats above the brine will mold so you will want to skim it off.

      Reply
  2. Christine

    I have a bag of sliced jalapenos in the freezer, intending to make cowboy candy. I would love to try fermenting these, should I thaw, then drain, or use frozen? I’m thinking the excess liquid might affect the salt ratio.

    Reply
    • Tish Painter

      Hi Christine,
      Unfortunatly, frozen foods do not ferment well. The colder temperatures of the freezer kills the bacteria needed for fermentation to properly work. Some things can be canned at home after freezing, such as tomatoes, but the options for a good product are more limited. Due to the freezing process makes the food expand and bursts the cell walls of many vegetables, canning them later gives a softer (mushy in some cases) texture. So for tomatoes, I can still make sauce with them but canning whole or halved tomatoes after freezing is not as appetizing.
      I have never canned jalapenos (or any peppers) after freezing them but since cowboy candy is a pickled type of product and will not be in the canner as long, it may be alright. But, having said that, I would love to know how well that works for you! It would be good to know for future. 🙂

      Reply

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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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It’s easy to romanticize homesteading, but the truth is that those homegrown vegetables, those freshly laid eggs, that loaf of bread rising on the counter, and that pantry full of home-canned food takes time, effort and dedication. It doesn’t “just happen” overnight!

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Got out for an early morning harvest today. Been up since 3am, contemplating life, the future and the past, the order of things…

There is a rumbling right now, not just in North America, but around the world. Many of us can feel it, and know we are on the precipice of something big.

I’d been hearing about this new song that’s become an overnight viral sensation, written by an (until now) unknown singer named Oliver Anthony. His new song Rich Men North of Richmond has had 14 million views on YouTube in the past week alone, so I decided to check it out.

I also saw a clip of him playing a Farmers Market last week, and anything that has to do with Farmers Markets always has my attention;)

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112 18

Another garlic harvest in the books!

Garlic is easily one of my favourite crops to grow. It’s pretty much a “set if and forget it” crop. We plant in the fall and leave it to overwinter, fertilize a couple times in the spring, start watering only once the ground starts to dry out, and then harvest in the summer. We can even plant a fall succession crop after our garlic if we want so it really makes great use of garden space all year round.

Over the years we’ve managed to become completely self-sufficient with garlic. We now grow enough to eat all year (and then some!), plus we save our own seed garlic and usually have extra to sell or give away. And around here fresh, organic garlic ain’t cheap, so it’s a good cash crop for anyone who’s serious about selling it.

It took me a few years to really get the hang of garlic, but it’s one crop I’m now very confident with (knock on wood, because it’s always when we make statements like this that next year’s crop fails! Lol.)

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If you’re simply looking for ways to save a little extra cash this summer and live well for less, here are 12 tried and tested frugal living tips for summer that you can use to save money this season without sacrificing a thing.
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A brand new issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine just dropped!

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🌱 How to forage and use five common edible and medicinal weeds

🏠 A sustainable, affordable alternative to traditional homes, greenhouses and more

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🫙 What to focus on when preserving food for true food security

🌹 How to grow and arrange your own cut flowers at home

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💇How to make your own all-natural herbal hair care products at home

🧑‍🌾 Why “community sufficiency” is the new self-sufficiency

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Visit modernhomesteadingmagazine.com (or click the link in my bio) to subscribe or login to the library and read the latest issue.

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*** This will be the last quarterly issue! ***

This little magazine has grown so much over the past 4 years and 32 issues, and now it’s time for another exciting evolution.

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If you’ve ever grown your own garlic, you might have noticed the spiral-shaped shoots that suddenly pop up in the centre of the stem, usually about a month or so before the garlic bulbs themselves are ready to be harvested.
These are garlic scapes, and believe it or not- they make delicious pesto! Get the recipe through the link in my bio- https://thehouseandhomestead.com/garlic-scape-pesto/
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This honey and chive blossom vinaigrette is a frugal, easy and healthy homemade salad dressing that pairs beautifully with fresh garden salads all season long.
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Whether you live in the city and grow a few herbs on your balcony, have a few backyard chickens in the suburbs or live in the country and have a larder full of enough home-canned food to survive the apocalypse, if living a more homemade, homegrown, self-sufficient lifestyle is important to you, Modern Homesteading Magazine was made for you!
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This radish top pesto recipe makes good use of the edible radish greens that often get discarded once they’re separated from the root. The end result is a peppery, slightly spicy twist on a classic pesto recipe.
A perfect condiment for all your summer snacking!
https://thehouseandhomestead.com/radish-top-pesto-recipe/
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