15 Emergency Preparedness Items You Need to Have Packed and Ready To Go


* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.

 

Disaster can strike anyone, anywhere at anytime. Don't be caught off guard. Be ready to bug out with this list of 15 emergency preparedness items you need to have packed and ready to go.Emergency preparedness is an important part of self-sufficiency, and self-sufficiency is a natural part of homesteading, so naturally the topic of preparedness (aka. “prepping”) comes up often in the modern homesteading community.

But as homesteaders, we tend to talk mostly about being prepared, well, at home! We grow and preserve our own food, stock our pantries to the hilt, save seeds, learn to DIY and make do or do without. Some of us live off grid or heat our homes with wood, raise our own meat and collect rainwater for the drought season. You could say that us homesteaders are more prepared than anyone if disaster were to strike… at home. But what if we had to leave our house and homestead behind? 

We may not like to think about it, but the reality is that many of the emergency situations that we should be prepared for are things that would most likely force us from our homes. 

I live out west on Vancouver Island. As climate change intensifies, we are seeing hotter, drier summers year-over-year, which means more and more forest fires threatening our communities. California just had its deadliest and most destructive wildfire season in history. Just one of the wildfires -the deadliest in California history- levelled an entire town, killing at least 88 people and destroying nearly 14,000 homes. 

But wildfires aren’t the only type of disaster that could make people have to pack up and leave. Every year hurricanes force thousands of people from their homes from the Atlantic down to the Gulf of Mexico (and even parts of the Pacific), and cyclones threaten homes and communities in other parts of the world. 

Here on Vancouver Island, we’ve also got a major earthquake fault line just off our coast, and while earthquakes happen without warning, communities on the west coast of the island are on tsunami evacuation warning should an earthquake occur in the Pacific Ocean.

In addition to natural and climate-related disasters, industrial disasters, chemical spills, threat of war and even spread of disease could also cause people to leave their homes.

So what do you take with you if you have to leave?

In general, every household is expected to be able to care for themselves for at least three days following any widespread disaster. But many people (dare I say most) aren’t prepared even for one, so when disaster does strike, these are the people rushing the grocery stores and clearing out everything on the shelves. Don’t be one of those people!

Get prepared ahead of time and pack your emergency bag now with these 15 emergency preparedness items you should always have packed and ready to go.

 

1. Important Documents

  • Birth certificates
  • Marriage certificates
  • Social security/social insurance cards
  • Passports
  • Insurance policies

You should have all of these important documents (or at least copies of them) packaged together and accessible in case you need to grab things and go quickly.

Either have them packed in a bug out bag or at least have them in an envelope or clipped together somewhere that is easily accessible. And make sure they’re somewhere you won’t forget about! The last thing you want in an emergency is to waste precious time searching high and low for something like this.

 

2. Water

  • 1 litre per person (bare minimum… 1 gallon is better)

You should have a 1 litre bottle of water per person at the very least to last everyone in your family until you get somewhere safe. 

FEMA recommends one gallon per person per day. Of course it can be tough to pack around (or even pack up) that much water, so you should at least have away of accessing fresh water no mater what. I highly recommend investing in a Lifestraw personal water filter to filter out contaminants from questionable water sources.

Each person in our house has a Lifestraw Go water bottle, which can be filled before leaving home and refilled -even with contaminated water- and provide filtered, clean drinking water.

 

3. Food

Ideally, you should have enough food to get you and your family through at least three days in case of emergency. Make sure you have a bug out bag (and/or your vehicle) packed with non-perishable snacks and food that requires little to no cooking, tools or mess to clean up. 

Some ideas are:

  • granola bars
  • beef jerky
  • trail mix
  • crackers
  • dried fruit
  • fruit leather

You could also pack some instant noodles that come in their own cup for cooking. It may not be the healthiest thing in the world, but it will fill you up and provide a hot meal in a pinch as long as you can access some boiling water. (Make sure to pack some utensils if you will need them).

Home-canned goods like pickles and apple sauce could be packed up at the last minute, but it’s not advisable to store home-canned goods for “bugging out” because temperature fluctuations could affect their safety if stored in a hot vehicle trunk or in a backpack. Plus, since canning jars are made out of glass, they run the risk of breaking. 

You can also dehydrate your own food. If you want to make sure you are packing healthy, shelf-stable dried food, you can make your own fruit leather, dried fruits and veggies and even beef jerky at home with a food dehydrator.

I have an Excalibur Food Dehydrator and I absolutely love it. It’s a bit of an investment up front but well worth the money you save in the long run by drying your own food (not to mention the health benefits).

 

4. Basic First Aid Kit

Any emergency supply list should always include at least a basic First Aid kit. You can purchase one that’s pre-assembled like this one, or you could build your own.

Disaster can strike anyone, anywhere at anytime. Don't be caught off guard. Be ready to bug out with this list of 15 emergency preparedness items you need to have packed and ready to go.

If you build your own First Aid Kit, you should include:

  • Bandaids
  • Sterile gauze/field dressing
  • Medical tape
  • Scissors
  • Alcohol wipes (for sterilization)
  • Tensor bandage
  • Roller bandages
  • Latex gloves
  • Abdominal pads
  • Any other specialized emergency medical supplies, such as an EpiPen or an asthma inhaler.

You should also take a First Aid course if possible so you know what to do in event of an emergency. You can search online for First Aid courses near you.

 

5. Pet Carriers/Supplies

While not everyone has pets, many of us do and they’re part of our family, so we will obviously take with us if we are forced to flee. Having pet carriers and supplies ready and easily accessible will save a lot of time in the event of an emergency.

Disaster can strike anyone, anywhere at anytime. Don't be caught off guard. Be ready to bug out with this list of 15 emergency preparedness items you need to have packed and ready to go.

You should have:

  • Pet carriers
  • Food
  • Water
  • Bowls (to eat and drink from)
  • Blanket or towel
  • Leashes & collars

We have two rabbits and two cats. They all have carriers ready to go and a bag of supplies full of pet treats, bottled water, bowls for them to eat and drink from and some freeze dried pet food that’s light and easy to pack around.

If you have livestock (and a way to transport them), make sure you have a plan for loading them into the vehicle and do your best to bring along some food and water for them. In some cases it will be difficult if not impossible to save all of your livestock. If this is the case and you can’t get them to safety in time, a last resort might be a method called “sheltering in place.” This basically just means that, rather than evacuating, you decide whether to confine livestock to a safe area or cut the fences and open the gates so that they can run if needed. Basically, if you can’t take them with you, give them a fighting chance.

 

6. Baby Supplies

  • Diapers
  • Wipes
  • Bottles and formula (if not breastfeeding)
  • Change of clothes
  • Warm pyjamas
  • Blanket
  • Receiving blankets
  • Snacks (if older)

Again, this one doesn’t apply to everyone, but if you have a baby or toddler, you should also have a diaper bag packed with supplies.

 

7. Extra Clothing

Having some extra clothing packed doesn’t seem like the most important thing on this list, and while it probably isn’t, it will be a huge comfort and relief to be able to put on a clean shirt and a new pair of underwear until you can get somewhere where you can clean your clothes and/or get some new clothes. Also, if you get wet or need to layer up or down, having extra clothes could go from being a comfort to a necessity.

Aim for the following for each family member:

  • 3 pairs of clean underwear
  • Extra t-shirt
  • A couple pairs of socks
  • A warm hoodie or sweater
  • Sensible shoes (preferably closed)

It may sound obvious, but fleeing your home is not the time to wear your heels, boots with lots of laces or go barefoot! Make sure you have sensible shoes ready to slip on at the door.

 

8. Pillows & Blankets

Another great comfort when away from home is to have some warm, comfortable blankets and pillows of your own. This is especially true if you need to sleep in your vehicle, and even more so if it’s winter. 

Keep a big, warm blanket in each of your family vehicles, big enough for the whole family to huddle under together. And keep some pillows in cases with handles (like the cases you can buy them in) so you can either store them in vehicles or grab and go quickly.

Of course, if you have enough warning you can also just bring the ones from your bed. But if you’ve only got 5 minutes to grab and go, you’ll be glad to have some packed and ready.

 

9. Medication

  • Prescriptions
  • Inhalers
  • Insulin
  • Epipens

If any family member is on prescription medication, relies on an inhaler, insulin, an epipen or has any special medical needs, you need to make sure you have potentially life-saving medications with you when you leave home.

While I wouldn’t recommend packing these ahead of time as you might need to use them and they don’t store well long-ter, you should keep all medications organized and together in an easily accessible spot.

As for non-prescription medications, you could stash some pain reliever (like ibuprofen or acetaminophen) in your first aid kit. Aspirin isn’t a bad idea either. It could save someone’s life if they’re having a heart attack.

Also, I hate to even put this on here (especially under medication), but if you are a smoker, have an emergency pack in your bug out bag. I’m an ex-smoker, so as much as I don’t advocate or encourage smoking AT ALL, I also know what it’s like to be one, and how smokers turn to cigarettes in stressful times. A major disaster is probably not the best time to try quitting. So don’t smoke. But if you do, stash an emergency pack and a lighter. 

 

10. Toiletries

Here’s a sample list of what you should have ready in your bag: 

  • Toothbrush (per person)
  • Toothpaste
  • Soap
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Toilet or tissue paper
  • Deoderant
  • Tampons or pads (because of course it will be “that time” right in the middle of a major emergency)
  • Hair brush and ties for long hair
  • Nail clippers
  • Q-Tips
  • Razor
  • Towel (or at least a hand towel to dry off)

 

11. Full tank of gas

Gas is one of the first things to run out during an emergency (especially an evacuation), and if you don’t have enough you won’t make it safely to your destination. 

You should always try to keep your gas tank at least half-full in case of an emergency. As soon as you hit the halfway mark on your gas gauge, fill up. This way you’ll never run out of gas even if it’s not an emergency. 

You could also store a jerrycan of gas in your garage, but don’t expect it to last indefinitely. Oil degrades over time and if it’s left to sit for too long you might find that when you fill your tank it fails completely. And don’t store it in your vehicle! I did that when my gas gauge was broken and I could smell gasoline every time I got in my car. The fumes are not healthy. Store it in the garage and rotate and replace it regularly. 

 

12. Survival Kit + Tools

Every bug out bag should contain some basic survival gear. Even if you know you’ll be going to stay with family or at a shelter where you’ll be taken care of, there are so many things that could happen that could require the use of some very basic survival gear.

Disaster can strike anyone, anywhere at anytime. Don't be caught off guard. Be ready to bug out with this list of 15 emergency preparedness items you need to have packed and ready to go.

Likewise, you might need some basic tools and parts in case your vehicle breaks down, your path is blocked by fallen branches or a plethora of other reasons.

Here are some basic items you should have with you

  • Flashlight (headlamps are great too)
  • Lighter, matches and flint (you can’t have too many ways to start fire)
  • Road flares
  • Pocket knife
  • Jumper Cables
  • Spare Tire
  • Axe (or at least a hatchet)
  • Bungee cords
  • Rope
  • Firestarters or dry material to start fire (I keep a Ziplock bag full of old dryer lint in my bug out bag to start fires with)

TBH, you should have these things in your vehicle all the time in case of a breakdown, flat tire or any other roadside emergency. 

 

13. Entertainment

This is more important than you might realize, especially if you have kids! Pack a few lightweight items to keep younger family members occupied and take their mind off the situation. Consider packing one or more of the following:

  • Books
  • Games
  • Cards
  • Colouring books and crayons
  • Puzzles
  • Journal and pen

This can be a HUGE morale booster for the whole family.

Also, if you end up at a shelter or somewhere where you will need to wait the disaster out, having a deck of cards with you can help to pass the time. 

 

14. Emergency Cash

In a disaster, there’s no guarantee that bank or debit machines will be working, so it’s super important to have some cash on you in case you need to purchase anything.

Aim to keep at least $100 of emergency cash in an envelope, either in your bug out bag or hidden somewhere in your car (or both!).

 

15. Checklist

Having a checklist that you can refer to can help you make sure you don’t forget anything on your bug out list. You could either have a physical checklist that’s been written or printed out or a digital one on your phone that you can access and check quickly (without needing internet access, because you might not have internet access in an emergency!)

Keep your printed checklist somewhere easily accessible (no sense in wasting your precious time searching for a checklist on top of everything else). Put it up on your fridge or on a cork board where every family member can see it and knows where it is. Go over it in a family meeting and make sure everyone knows what to do in event of an emergency. 

In order to truly be well prepared, you need to make sure the whole family is on the same page and ready to work together. 

 

How you prepare is up to you

There are many more things I could include on this list, and of course depending on how much time you have to evacuate or bug out, you might be able to pack up more or less. 

Other factors such as the size of your vehicle, whether or not you have a camper or trailer, or whether you even have your own vehicle at all and how large your family is will obviously dictate exactly how much you can and should bring with you.

This is a basic list of things you should consider packing up ahead of time and having ready to go in case you ever need to evacuate your home for any reason. But only you know what actually makes the most sense for your own family and situation.

At the end of the day, how you prepare is up to you. But do be prepared. Never think it can’t or won’t happen to you, because it can and does happen to people just like you all the time.

And don’t expect anyone else to take care of you and your family. While disaster situations often prompt an outpouring of support and goodwill from others (and yes, even from the government), there are often so many people affected by large-scale disasters that there has to be some level of personal responsibility on behalf of everyone. 

And remember to help out your fellow humans and animals if and when possible too. We’re all in this together.

Wishing you homemade, homegrown, homestead happiness 🙂SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


CATEGORIES
HOMESTEADING
REAL FOOD
NATURAL LIVING

8 Comments

  1. SOS Survival Products

    Thanks a lot for listing everything! It’s definitely very important to have an emergency survival kit. Also, if you’re bringing a flashlight, then you should also have some extra batteries.

    Reply
  2. Abby Fields

    I love this list! I also like to make sure I have a list of emergency contact information, insurance phone numbers, and emergency restoration service numbers.

    Reply
  3. Mr Bill

    Very good just hope many people take your advice. I have many more things in my BUG OUT camp trailer. Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  4. Herb Pelz

    If you have half a brain, these are common sense items with a few just excess baggage when RUUNING. Playing games is excess weight and volume. When you are on the runs you should be teaching your children.

    Reply
    • Anna Sakawsky

      Thanks for your comment! I respectfully disagree, however. Keeping morale up is a HUGE part of dealing with any emergency or stressful situation, especially for children. I’m a teacher as well, and my school requires parents to pack bags with extra clothes, snacks and games and toys for children to go in our emergency kits in case of an earthquake, fire, lockdown or (fill-in-the-blank). Also, many times we are not talking a full on zombie apocalypse here, but a wildfire, earthquake or something else that forces us from our homes and sees us not on the run, but in our vehicles stuck in traffic trying to make our way out of the area. Having games on hand is an excellent way to help pass the time and offer a positive distraction when dealing with the stress of this type of emergency situation. But of course this list can be tailored to suit your specific needs. Feel free to toss the games if they are weighing you down:)

      Reply
      • Catherine

        I agree with the playing games. Backpacking sized games: deck of cards, Cribbage board, Farkle, and Adult Coloring book with colored pencils. Minimal weight but hours of fun and family focussed. We have met fellow travelers who would hunker down for a game of Farkle. LOL Love the list of things to prep for emergency. Water is the most cumbersome thing to have on hand for me. We are a family of 3, plus 2 labs, 4 cats, 1 cockatiel, and 2 horses. Freeze-dried food for pets is the best take away for me. Have you ever tried to locate cats in a stressful situation? Like you, crates are kept by the main exit door and blankets are cleaned between uses. An extra leash (with waste disposal bags) and a harness (they wear collars) are tucked inside with a clean blanket. Most recent shots records are laminated and attached to crates. We are homesteaders too. I dislike pre-packed food, but it does have preservatives and space saving packaging, so we rotate through it, in moderation. If we had to go to a shelter, we would want at least 3 days of self sufficiency while services are organized. Medicine boxes and backpacks are color specific to family member. Learned this when DD was small and who’s box/bag was who’s= stressful. Our animals would make a government shelter likely impossible, but it is less stressful to be prepared. DD was raised this way, so her household is also prepped. Thanks for the great article, Anna.

        Reply
        • Anna Sakawsky

          Hi Catherine,

          Yes, I do really believe games and distractions are important in a stressful situation! They may not be priority number one, but it really doesn’t hurt (or add much weight) to throw a deck of cards in your bag. What is Farkle? I must look into this! The freeze dried food seriously cuts down weight, and I have tried feeding it to my cats at home and they like it. It’s always best to get them acquainted with a new food like that in their normal environment as they may not eat it if they’re already stressed out. I can imagine water would be extra difficult if you have large livestock like horses, etc. in addition to a fairly large family to keep hydrated. That’s why I love having our Lifestraw water bottles because then we am always refill without any worry of the water not being safe to drink (or at least the risk is minimized big time). As for locating cats in a stressful situation, I have learned a lot about this as we lost a kitty when she ran from an accident when we were moving to our last house. My husband rolled out truck and trailer and the animals were inside. She took off into the woods and despite months of searching, we never found her. It was the most traumatic experience of my life, let alone hers. But I learned a lot about animal (specifically cat) behaviour from that experience. My best advice would be to familiarize yourself with your cats’ usual hiding spots so you know where to look if they’re hiding. Stay calm yourself as your energy will rub off on them. Have their favourite treats on hand to coax them out if need be and when you get them in the carrier, cover it with a towel or blanket if you can. Keeping them from seeing out helps keep them calmer. And never let them out of their carriers until you’re somewhere safe and secure as they likely will bolt. Sometimes you have to learn things the hard way. I’ll never forgive myself for not being better prepared when our kitty went missing. But I did my best at the time. Still hoping she magically turns up one day. It’s been just over 3 years now. Lucky we all survived though so I count my blessings every day and take pride in being as prepared as possible from now on.

          Reply
          • Madlyn

            Children are going to freak no matter what you do and if they can see or hear the problem there going to know that something is defiantly wrong and when you try to distract them with sum card games.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
You Might Also Like
My Favourite Things – 2022 Edition (aka. The Modern Homesteader’s Christmas Wish List)

My Favourite Things – 2022 Edition (aka. The Modern Homesteader’s Christmas Wish List)

* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   Every year around this time, I compile a list of my favourite things: Things that I love, use or covet for my own homestead, and things that I know other modern...

read more

Homemade Beef Jerky Recipe (Dehydrator + Oven Instructions)

Homemade Beef Jerky Recipe (Dehydrator + Oven Instructions)

* This article contains affiliate links. For more information, please read my Affiliate Disclosure.   Homemade beef jerky is a delicious way to preserve meat for food storage and for easy transport to take on hikes, camping trips, road trips and to pack in a...

read more

“Not eating mushrooms is like not eating an entire food group… And a healthy one.”

Mushrooms have had a bit of a bad rap in the west for a long time. Depending on the type of mushroom in question, they’ve either been regarded as something to turn your nose up at or even something to be afraid of.

But in recent years mushrooms have started gaining momentum as both medicine and superfoods, and with more and more people looking for natural alternatives to conventional (and often harmful) prescription drugs, psychedelic mushrooms are even being legalized and used in small (micro) doses to treat mental health issues with promising results.

The story of mushrooms and the entire fungi kingdom is as complex and captivating as the mycelium networks they fruit from, and the potential health and wellness benefits of adding more mushrooms into our diets and lives are only just beginning to be understood.

I sat down with Louis Giller of @northsporemushrooms for the winter issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine to talk all about the wonderful world of fabulous fungi, how to get started foraging or growing mushrooms at home (even if you live in an apartment!), and why mushrooms of all kinds (edible, medicinal and psychedelic) are rightfully having a moment right now.

If becoming more self-sufficient and optimizing your overall health and wellness is part of your master plan for 2023, mushrooms should definitely be a part of your approach.

Start by checking out my full interview with Louis in the winter issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine - Link in bio to sign in or subscribe.

And while you’re there, be sure to check out our feature on medicinal mushrooms, as well as our elevated mushroom recipes, all of which make perfect winter meals for your family table.

Link in bio @anna.sakawsky or head to https://modernhomesteadingmagazine.com

#mushrooms #medicinalmushrooms #eatyourshrooms #fantasticfungi #homesteading #modernhomesteading
...

13 0

When I first started growing my own food at home, the gardening world seemed pretty black and white to me: plants grow in the dirt, outdoors, in the spring and summer. That’s what us city kids always learned in school anyway.⁣

And obviously that’s not wrong, but once you get into gardening and growing food, a world full of endless possibilities starts to open up, including growing food indoors year-round.⁣

Sprouts are considered to be a superfood because of how nutrient dense they are and when we eat them, we get the health benefits of all of those nutrients in our own bodies.⁣

If you live in a climate that remains colder half the year or more, sprouts can be an excellent way to get the benefits of gardening even when it's not "gardening season". ⁣

I've got a full list of tips & tricks on growing sprouts indoors all year round that includes: ⁣

-How to grow sprouts⁣
-Different ways to use them ⁣
-Where to buy seeds and more! ⁣

Visit this link https://thehouseandhomestead.com/grow-sprouts-indoors/ or check the link in my bio to see all the details.
...

16 4

Living a slow, simple life isn’t easy in this fast-paced world.

No matter how much I preach it to everyone else, I still struggle with the guilt, shame and “not enough-ness” that I feel every time I choose rest, relaxation, stillness, disconnectedness or being “unproductive” when I feel I SHOULD be working, hustling, moving, checking emails and being “productive” (which is almost always).

We all know that our culture praises productivity and busy-ness, and most of us know it’s a scam that keeps us stressed, burnt out and focused on the wrong things in life. Ultimately many of us end up feeling unfulfilled even though we’re spinning our wheels every day working to keep up with the demands of the world and our never-ending to-do list. Most of us would rather be resting, relaxing, spending quality time with our loved ones and doing things that light us up rather than simply keep us busy. But it’s hard to break free from the societal pressure to do more, produce more, earn more, acquire more and ultimately BE more.

So while I still struggle with this daily, and I don’t have any easy answers for how to overcome this, I wanted to share that today I’m choosing slow; Today I’m choosing to be present in the here and now rather than worrying about yesterday or tomorrow; Today I’m choosing snuggles with my baby boy over emails and deadlines, and while I still feel that guilt rising up inside me, I’m making a conscious effort to remind myself that the world won’t end because I chose to slow down today, and at the end of my life I won’t regret taking this time with my son, but I might regret NOT slowing down to enjoy it.

I encourage you to apply the same thought process to your own life and give yourself permission to slow down and enjoy the gift of time you’ve been given today. After all, you never know when it might be your last day. And if it were your last, how would you wish you’d spent it?
...

148 20

In the dark, bitter cold days of midwinter when we’ve been deprived of quality time in the sunshine and the trees are all bare, it can be easy for almost anyone to feel depressed and to overlook the tiny miracles that are happening all around us.⁣

Signs of life abound, even in the dead of winter! ⁣

Connect with nature and enjoy the little things to help beat the winter blues. Go for a walk in the woods or the park and really pay attention to the natural world around you. Watch the songbirds flitting back and forth, gathering winter berries. Look for signs of greenery and new growth; Maybe even some snowdrops or crocuses have begun to emerge from the ground where you live. ⁣

If you're feeling the effects of SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) right now, please check out my full list of Natural Ways to Combat SAD and additional resources to seek out help from various care providers here https://thehouseandhomestead.com/natural-ways-treat-seasonal-affective-disorder/ or visit the link my bio. ⁣

Spring is coming!
...

70 2

While most people run to the store every time they need something, you and I are not most people. Oh no friend… We are modern homesteaders.⁣

We’re a special breed, and one thing that sets us apart is that we are always thinking about preparing for the future and about stocking up when the things are abundant (and cheap!) which they aren't so much right now. ⁣

When it comes to citrus fruits, if you live in a place where you can grow them yourself, then you’ll probably have more than you can handle fresh when they’re in season. Knowing how to preserve them will help ensure nothing gets wasted.⁣

Whether you're a seasoned homesteader or this is your first season preserving, I've got a hearty list of ideas of how to get the most out of your citrus fruits for the year to come! Visit the full list here https://thehouseandhomestead.com/12-ways-use-preserve-citrus-fruits/ or check out the link in my bio. ⁣

What do you usually do with your extra citrus fruits? Have you tried any of these preservation methods?⁣

Let me know in the comments below!
...

19 1

Checking in on all my #homesteadpantrychallenge participants today :) ⁣

During the pantry challenge I always find it pretty easy to make my way through the canned items. A side dish here, a breakfast there, but what about bulk items that we have on hand like bags of sugar and flour?⁣

Well have no fear, this bread recipe is a game-changer! Not only does it only require 3 simple ingredients (plus water), it can be whipped up in a bowl using an ordinary kitchen spoon and it comes out perfect every time. It will help you make your way through that 5lb bag of flour just sitting on the shelf, and it only takes a couple minutes to prepare. ⁣

This is a really nice bread to dip in olive oil and balsamic vinegar or as part of a spread or cheese board. For the full recipe click here https://thehouseandhomestead.com/easy-no-knead-homemade-bread/ or visit the link in my bio. ⁣

Let me know how it turns out and if you decide to add any herbs or other toppings to spice it up, I want to hear about it!
...

14 0

I’ve tried my hand at many skills and tackled my share of adventurous projects over the years. Along my homesteading and journey I’ve tried everything from candle-making to cheesemaking, sourdough bread to fermented vegetables, canning and dehydrating to rendering lard and more. When it comes to home medicine, I’ve learned how to make may useful concoctions, from herbal teas, tinctures and syrups to poultices, salves, ciders and more. But encapsulating my own placenta after the birth of our son was definitely a first, and by far my most adventurous “kitchen project” and foray into home medicine so far.

I have to admit, I was a bit squeamish at first, but I’m fascinated by this kind of stuff and love learning skills that allow me to take my health and well-being into my own hands. I also love challenging myself to try new things and pushing myself out of my comfort zone.

A few of the possible benefits of consuming placenta after birth include:

• Hormones in the placenta can improve mood and lessen symptoms of postpartum depression
• Can reduce postpartum bleeding
• Provides a natural source of iron and other micronutrients
• Can help boost milk production

And did you know, around 99% of mammals are know to consume their placenta after birth? Only humans and marine mammals do not typically consume their placenta.

But more and more humans are opting to consume their placentas after birth to reap the potential health benefits. The most popular way to do so is through encapsulation.

First the placenta is steamed, then it is sliced thin and dehydrated before being ground up into a fine powder. The you add that powder into some capsules using an encapsulator and you’re done!

I’ve been taking 2 capsules 4x/day for the past week. Any real results are yet to be seen but I didn’t want to pass up the only chance I’ll probably get to try my hand at this home medicine project! I mean, you just never know when this skill might come in handy;)

So tell me, what’s the most adventurous thing YOU’VE tried in the name of homesteading and/or natural health? Comment below and let me know!
...

136 16

Since the weather is often cold, dark and gloomy, there aren’t as many fun, free things to do outdoors, so it’s easy to blow your budget on other things that will help you beat cabin fever like eating out, going to the movies and even going shopping just for something to do.⁣

But the flip side to this is that, once January hits, many people are motivated by the fresh start the new year brings and are ready to hunker down for a while and get their finances on track after the holidays. So in many ways that makes winter the perfect time of year to adopt some frugal habits. ⁣

Visit this link https://thehouseandhomestead.com/12-frugal-living-tips-for-winter/ or the link in my bio for the full list of Frugal Winter Living tips, and if you're already looking and planning towards Spring you'll also find more frugal living tips for every season linked at the bottom of the list!
...

19 1

Our#homesteadpantrychallenge is in full-swing and now that our little one has arrived, simple and frugal pantry meals are a necessity to ensure we are getting adequate rest and not overdoing it during these newborn days. ⁣

When I'm staring at the pantry wondering what to make, I love referring back to this list for a little bit of inspiration for either bringing back an old recipe, or creating a new one. ⁣

𝗪𝗵𝗮𝘁'𝘀 𝗜𝗻𝗰𝗹𝘂𝗱𝗲𝗱: ⁣
Breakfasts⁣
Soups⁣
Homemade Breads⁣
Main Dishes⁣
Snacks & Sides⁣
Sweets & Treats⁣

So whether you’re trying to save a little extra money on your grocery bill, or prioritizing rest this season these 35 frugal recipes will help you get good, wholesome, delicious homemade food on the table every day, which means you have one less thing to stress about. ⁣

Check out the full list at https://thehouseandhomestead.com/frugal-recipes-roundup/ or visit the link in my bio. ⁣

Eat well friends:)
...

22 1

I hope you had a wonderful and restful end of holidays, and are also feeling ready to get back on track with your daily schedule here in the new year. It can sometimes feel like a lot to get going, but those "regular days" help us to regulate our rhythms, and in turn help us slowly, gear up for the Spring season ahead. ⁣

In our Winter Issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine, my friend and fellow homesteader, Ashley Constance of @alittleselfreliant wrote "Breaking Your Cabin Fever" a list of ideas for staying productive over the winter months. ⁣

If you're feeling a bit restless and up to it, this list of ideas is a perfect way to get back into a daily routine. ⁣

From making and creating, to preparing, planning and organizing you'll be feeling ready for Spring in no time. ⁣

To see the full list, subscribe to Modern Homesteading Magazine here at https://modernhomesteadingmagazine.com/subscribe/ or visit the link in my bio.
...

37 0

© The House & Homestead | All Rights Reserved | Legal