10 Tips to Help You Save Money at the Grocery Store


10 Tips for Saving Money at the Grocery Store | Your monthly grocery bill can make or break your budget. Spend less and save more with this list of simple ways to save money at the grocery store.Your monthly grocery bill can make or break your budget depending on your shopping habits. If you run to the store every time you need something, you’re probably spending more than if you intentionally planned your shopping trips.

Practicing simple habits like checking flyers, writing lists and stocking up when things are on sale can help you save thousands of dollars on groceries over the course of a year.

Every dollar you save is a dollar more in your bank account, and those dollars add up. Over time your savings could equal a new vehicle, a family vacation or some extra padding on your emergency savings fund.

I have personally tried and tested all of the following money-saving methods and I am amazed how much money I save while still eating (and feeding my family) incredibly well and never feeling deprived.

The best part is that all of the actions on this list are things you can start doing right away. The only investment is a little of your time. So dust off your piggy bank and start saving those hard-earned dollars. And remember to treat yourself when that bank is full!

 

1. Check flyers

This is so important. Take some time to flip through your local flyers before you hit the grocery store. Check your list and then check flyers to see if anything you need is on sale. Circle items that are a good deal and write down the price and store name beside the corresponding item on your shopping list.

If you see something on sale that you know you will need soon (like toilet paper) but it is not on your list, circle it anyway and if you’ve got any wiggle room in your budget, stock up while it’s on sale.

You can also check flyers online if you think it’s too much of a hassle to spread all the paper flyers out and do this the old-fashioned way. You can go to each store’s website to check their weekly flyer, or check out flipp.com.

 

2. Check your receipt!

Cashiers are human too, and they make mistakes! But the onus is on you to check your receipt and make sure you were charged correctly.

Always check your receipt, but as an added “safety measure,” make a mental note of (approximately) how much each item costs as you put it in your cart. Or go one step further and write down the price on your shopping list as you go. Doing this will give you a pretty good idea of what your total will be so you’ll know if there’s a discrepancy when you go to pay.

If your total cost sounds off, make sure to check your receipt. But even if it sounds right, it doesn’t hurt to give it a once over.

If you notice a mistake, take your receipt to customer service and get your money back. I am not kidding when I say that I notice mistakes all the time. Although it takes a few minutes to correct, it’s well worth the savings. As an added bonus, some stores even credit you extra cash for your troubles. It really does pay to be vigilant!

 

3. Use loyalty points

I know, collecting points can be a slow process and wallets just aren’t made with enough pockets to hold all those membership cards, but collecting loyalty points really can pay off.

When my husband lost his job right before Christmas a few weeks ago, I decided to save some money by redeeming over $200 worth of points at the grocery store. I only had to pay another $13 and our entire Christmas 

Many points programs at major retailers are also getting easier to use. Nowadays you can usually download an app with a barcode matching your account so all you need to do is scan your phone at checkout.

There are also lots of ways to accumulate points quicker. Just like checking flyers, it pays to check for any special points offers at the stores you frequent. Buying certain products or spending a certain amount in one trip may also earn you extra points. Sometimes, though, you need to load the points onto your card by clicking a link online or through an app. As soon as I figured this out I started earning points WAY quicker. So check your loyalty points programs to see if there are added ways to earn.

Now for the warning: Don’t buy things (or shop at a certain location) JUST to earn points. You will end up spending more money this way, which is what stores bank on. You still need to do your homework and figure out where you are going to get the best deal. Something may be worth points at one store, but may be on sale for a great price at another. You will need to calculate the savings.

If the sale price will save you more money than the points are worth, forgo the points. If, however, the points are worth more in future savings than the current sale price, you may want to spend more up front and earn points for later if your budget allows it.

Also, don’t buy something you don’t need just because it’s worth lots of points. If it’s something you need, want and will actually use now or in the future, then go for it. If it’s something you only want but don’t need and/or if it doesn’t fit into your budget, put it back and save your money now. There will be another deal on something worthwhile in the future.

 

4. Use coupons

Much the same as using points, check for coupons for products on your shopping list. I’ll be honest, I’m not a huge coupon collector. This is simply because I rarely seem to find coupons for things I actually want or need. It’s still worth it to check for coupons though because when you do find one it’s like finding free money!

You can check newspapers, flyers, the entrances and aisles of grocery stores or even just ask the cashier! You can also check online. When I am shopping online I will almost always google “Coupon Code for (name of product or website I am shopping on)” and see if I can find a discount code.

I will also check directly with company websites to see if I can get a manufacturer’s coupon for certain products. For example, the last time I bought Advil I went to Advil’s website and found a section called Offers and Coupons. Lo and behold, I scored a $1.00 off coupon for a product that I was going to buy anyway.

The great thing about manufacturers’ coupons is they typically can be doubled up. So if the item is on sale or if the store is offering extra points or a store coupon for the product, you can throw down a manufacturer’s coupon and get the store savings as well.

 

5. Know your unit prices

If you really want to be a savvy shopper, you’ve gotta know your unit prices. You have to understand how to do this if you are going to accurately compare prices.

Let’s say you’re buying orange juice: You can get a 59 fl oz carton (or for Canadians, a 1.5 litre carton) for $5.99 or you can get a 32 fl oz carton (900 ml) for $3.99. Which is the better deal? In some cases the price per unit will be marked on the sale tag, but most times it is up to you to figure out. Here is where you need to know some basic math.

  1. Take the price of the first item and divide it by the amount of units the product is being measured in (in this case fluid ounces): So 5.99 / 59 = .1015… So the cost per unit is just over 10 cents per fl oz.
  2. Do the same thing with the second item: 3.99 / 32 = .12468… So the cost per unit is just over 12 cents per fl oz.
  3. Now that you have the cost per fluid oz for each item, you can accurately compare them:       10 cents per fl oz for product #1 vs. 12 cents per fl oz for product #2. Product #1 (the larger carton) is the better deal.

Use the calculator on your cell phone or carry one with you when you shop. You can even do simple calculations in your head. The more you make this a habit, the quicker and easier it will become. 

You will benefit from knowing a few basic conversions (such as grams to ounces) and also how many of each unit are in a larger unit (such as how many millilitres are in a litre, or how many ounces in a pound). But while you may memorize some of these, you can always just Google these conversions on your phone. There are also some great, free apps available that will do the same thing.

 

6. Stock up on sale items

One of the biggest mistakes that people make is buying things at full price as they need them. You can and should stock up on non-perishable essentials like toothpaste or toilet paper when they’re on sale.

If you decide to stock up, however, stick to stocking only what you and your family will actually use. If you don’t like oatmeal, don’t buy up the store when it’s on sale. Remember, a deal is only a deal on things we actually want and will use. Otherwise you’ll just waste money and clutter your house with stuff that will take up space until it eventually gets tossed. 

Check flyers regularly to know when the things you use are on sale. Check stores for sales, especially after holidays and at the end of the season. Seasonal items always go on clearance, and you can get all sorts of great deals on everything from cookie cutters and paper plates to chocolate and candy. Plus, you can stock up on things you can use next time that holiday rolls around, like decorations and gifts!

 

7. Buy in season (and grow your own)

When you buy fruits and vegetables in season you’re buying when they’re most abundant. Since the supply is high and the products are perishable, the prices for produce in peak season are usually significantly lower.

I am also a strong advocate for eating local and supporting your local farmers. Buying in season means you can buy from local farms that grow organic food and leave a smaller carbon footprint.

When you buy out of season, the produce you eat has to be shipped in from somewhere it is growing. That means it’s more likely to be genetically modified and/or sprayed with pesticides to keep it in pristine condition until it finally reaches your plate. In the end, buying in season means you’re saving money, supporting your local community and getting healthier food.

Of course, you’ll save even more money if you grow your own fruits and veggies. But if you’re just starting out or don’t have the space to grow enough food to feed your family for the year, buying local food in season is a nice way to supplement your food supply.

10 Tips for Saving Money at the Grocery Store | Your monthly grocery bill can make or break your budget. Spend less and save more with this list of simple ways to save money at the grocery store.Now, I know that there are certain fruits and veggies that don’t grow in your zone, but I still recommend buying them in season from the closest possible source. Since I’m in the Pacific Northwest, things like lemons, oranges and pineapples don’t grow here, so I buy them when they’re in season in the closest places that they do grow: California and Hawaii. I’ll stock up on these items in late winter -when they are in season in their respective climates- and preserve them for enjoyment all year round.

Only stock up on a bunch of fresh produce if you are ready to preserve it though. Otherwise just buy as much as you will be able to eat fresh so it doesn’t spoil and cost you money. And again, only buy produce that you and your family will eat. There’s no point in buying 10 lbs of green beans to put up if no one in your family eats green beans. It will only cost you money and time preserving it all if it never makes it to your dinner plate.

If you do end up with extra produce that you won’t eat or can’t preserve, consider sharing with neighbours, friends and family or donating to your local food bank. Someone may as well get to enjoy it, and feeding others is never a waste of money.

 

8. Eat before you shop

Shopping on an empty stomach is a bad idea. When you’re hungry you’re more likely to buy junk food and to deviate from your shopping list. In fact, you may even be more likely to buy non-food items! 

According to a study from the University of Minnesota, hunger makes us more tempted to acquire things in general, so we tend to impulse shop and overbuy.

The solution to this problem is a simple one, but you need to make it a conscious habit to fill up before you hit the supermarket and stick to your shopping list while you’re there. Having a quick bite before grocery shopping might also save you calories on all those sample foods! (Although who’s gonna pass up free food?)

 

9. Make a list

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve wandered the grocery store aimlessly wondering what to buy. In fact, this happens every time I go without some sort of list. I also find that I usually end up buying more processed foods instead of buying raw ingredients to make something from scratch.

Even keeping a mental list is better than no list at all. But writing a proper list on paper will definitely increase your chances of staying on budget. Of course, you will need to stick to the list, but you are 100% more likely to stick to a list that you’ve written than a list that doesn’t exist!

10 Tips for Saving Money at the Grocery Store | Your monthly grocery bill can make or break your budget. Spend less and save more with this list of simple money-saving tips and tricks.

As an added bonus, when you sit down and intentionally make a list ahead of time, you can stick to a meal plan and do some pre-planning by checking flyers for the best deals on the things you need. You’re also more likely to make healthier choices.

When I make my lists I also write the flyer price down beside each item so I have a good idea of how much my grocery trip will cost. This will also help you catch any discrepancies at checkout if you are accidentally charged the wrong price for something.

 

10. Use cash

Spending on credit cards makes you more likely impulse buy and to spend more money. In fact, according to one popular study, consumers who shop with credit cards spend an average of 12-18% more than their cash-carrying counterparts. Using cash is a physical reminder of the value of money. It can make us think twice about trading it for things we don’t really need or want.

If you decide to forgo the plastic, you may want to consider using the envelope system. This is where you make envelopes for all of your major spending categories (ie. groceries, transportation, entertainment, etc.) and allot a certain amount of cash to each envelope for the month.

The trickiest part is sticking to only spending cash from the envelopes. If you can commit to this system though, it’s a surefire way to keep you on budget! To learn more about how the envelope system works, check out this post on money-guru Dave Ramsey’s site.

While using cash is often recommended to help you stay on budget, it might not be the best option for you. My husband and I have tried it multiple times but we actually find it easier to spend from our joint bank account. This way we don’t have to worry about saving all our receipts and we can both access our account to keep track of spending. 

There are also some great apps like Mint and EveryDollar to help you keep track of spending with credit and debit. I would recommend trying both systems and doing what works best for you. Then stick to only cash or only cards. Mixing the two is a surefire way to lose track of spending.

 

Planning and Preparation is the Key to Saving Money

When it comes to saving money, planning and preparing for a shopping trip or big expenditure can be well worth it’s weight in gold.

Planning helps to avoid money-spending pitfalls like impulse buying and overspending. When you’re intentional about how you spend your money you’re more likely to keep more of it. You’re also more likely to only spend on items that truly benefit you and enhance your life.

Stocking up on things while they’re on sale is another awesome strategy for saving money in the long run. But becoming too focused on taking advantage of sales can cost you in the end if you’re not careful. You may end up impulse buying a bunch of stuff you don’t need just because it was on sale. 

I’ve said it already, but I can’t stress this point enough. A deal is not a deal if it’s on something you don’t like, won’t use or never knew you needed until you stumbled upon it. If you are serious about saving money, your purchases need to be intentional.

So by all means, stock up on 500 rolls of toilet paper. You will use toilet paper and the rolls won’t go bad before you can get to them all. But don’t waste your money on anything that will just clutter your space and eventually go to waste. At that point you may as well just throw your money away. Always remember that spending money is spending money. You are only saving money on sale items if you planned to spend that money on those items in the first place.

Be intentional, invest a bit of time up front, know a real deal when you see it and be prepared to stock up when the getting is good. And remember to create a budget and keep track of your spending! I guarantee if you follow these steps you will save money, and shave hundreds or even thousands off your grocery bill each year.

So start dreaming about what you will use all that extra money for! Just remember to spend it wisely.

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ABOUT ANNA
Hi! I’m Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader who’s passionate about growing, cooking and preserving real food at home, creating my own herbal medicine and all-natural home and body care products, and working toward a simpler, more sustainable and self-sufficient life each and every day. 
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Never before have we had access to so much information at our fingertips. Whether you have a question you need answered, are looking for a tutorial to walk you through a specific task or are searching for a recipe to help you figure out what to make for dinner, all you have to do is Google it.⁣

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While it's definitely an exciting time to be alive, so many people are feeling overwhelmed, and are craving a return to the analog world; To a world where information was shared in the pages of trusted books and publications, or was passed on from human to human, from someone who held that knowledge not because they Googled it, but because they lived it, experienced it, even mastered it.⁣

That what sets Homestead Living magazine apart from much of the information you'll find online: We don't have staff writers, we have experienced homesteaders sharing their hard-won wisdom in each issue. And while we do offer a digital version, we're also now offering monthly PRINT issues for U.S. subscribers (Canada and elsewhere hopefully coming soon!)⁣

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When I graduated from university with a degree in journalism many years ago, I remember thinking that while I knew how to write, edit, interview, shoot, and handle just about every part of creating a publication from the editorial standpoint, I really had no clue how to actually get published, let alone how the printing process works.

Over the years I’ve followed my passion for writing, editing and creating content, figuring much of it out on my own. From creating my blog to “self-publishing” my own digital/print magazine for the last 4 years, I’ve taught myself most of the practical skills necessary for turning an idea into a publication and getting said publication in the hands and in front of the eyes of many hundreds of readers.

But now that I’ve joined forces with the team at @homesteadlivingmagazine and @freeportpress, we’re all able to level up and reach many THOUSANDS of print and digital readers together.

People are HUNGRY for tried and tested advice on homesteading and self-reliant living. There’s a huge movement happening right now as more people wake up to all of the corruption in the world and realize that many of the systems we have come to depend on are fragile and on the brink of collapse. People are ready to take matters into their own hands by growing their own food, preparing their own meals, becoming producers instead of merely consumers and taking control of their health, freedom, security and lives.

I’m so proud to not only be a part of this movement, but to be at the forefront of it with some of the most passionate, talented and driven individuals I could ask to work with.

Getting to meet and brainstorm with some of the team in person and tour the printing facilities over the last few days has opened up a whole new world of possibilities, not just for me, but for everyone who considers themselves part of the modern homesteading movement. We are growing faster than I could have ever imagined. We’re creating a system outside of the system! We’re charging full steam ahead and we invite you to climb aboard and join us for the ride:)

#homesteading #modernhomesteading #homesteadliving #selfsufficiency #selfreliance
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27 5

It’s been a minute since I popped into IG to say hi. (Hi! 👋) But before I share what’s been going on behind the scenes, I thought it would be a good time to (re)introduce myself, because I’ve never actually done that before!

My name’s Anna, and I’m a city girl turned modern homesteader living in the beautiful Comox Valley on Vancouver Island. I live with my family (human, furry and feathered) on 1/4 acre property where we grow and preserve hundreds of pounds of our own food every year, and strive to live a more self-reliant lifestyle in all that we do.

I grew up in Vancouver and had pretty much zero experience homesteading before my husband, Ryan and I decided we wanted to escape the rat race, become less dependent on the modern industrial food system (and all modern industrialized systems), and dove head first into this lifestyle around a decade ago.

We packed up and moved to Vancouver Island where we live now, started our first garden, and the rest is pretty much history.

(Well, actually that’s not true… There have been A LOT of ups and downs, successes and failures, wins and losses, struggles, challenges and pivotal moments along the way, but those are stories for another day).

Over the past few years, our decision to follow a less conventional path that aims to break free (at least in some part) from “the system” has been affirmed over and over again. We all know for a fact now that our food system, healthcare system, financial system, transportation system and so much more are all really just a house of cards built on shaky ground. We’ve been lucky so far, but sooner or later it’s all liable to collapse.

But preparedness and security isn’t the only thing that drives us… The peace of mind I get knowing that everything we grow is 100% organic, and that the ingredients in our food, medicine, personal and household products are safe and natural is worth more than anything I could buy at the grocery store.

(I’m not perfect though. Not by a long shot. I still rely on the grocery store, on modern medicine, and on many modern conveniences to get by, but I balance it as much as I can:)

(Continued in comments…)
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I’m all about practical gifts; Gifts that will truly make life easier and contribute to my and my family’s wellbeing. And our family includes our animals!

One of the ways we make sure our chickens are taken care of is by letting them free range during the day, but making sure they’re locked up and safe from predators at night. But who wants to be up at the crack of dawn to open the coop, or wake up to a bloodbath because you forgot to close the coop the night before?

(The answer is obviously no one… No one wants that).

Automating our homesteading tasks as much as possible allows us to worry about other things and saves us a ton of time. Plus, it makes sure that things get taken care of, whether we remember or not.

Using an automatic chicken door has been a GAME CHANGER for us. It’s one of those lesser known homestead tools that can make all the difference, and I’m always recommending one to anyone who keeps chickens!

This chicken door from @chickcozy_ is so easy to install and use too, and right now you can get one for a steal during their Black Friday sale!

Save over $40 off an automatic chicken door, plus use my coupon code for an ADDITIONAL DISCOUNT!

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Comment “Chicken” below for more info and to get my exclusive coupon code! 🐓

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Yes, you read that right…

Modern Homesteading Magazine is coming to an end.

This decision has not come easily, but there’s a season for everything, and more and more I’m feeling called to transition out of this season and into the next in both life and business.

And so this final farewell issue is bittersweet. On the one hand, it’s the first ever annual issue, with 100 pages packed with brand new content that celebrates the best of the past 32 issues!

And it’s the first issue I’ve ever offered in PRINT!

But on the other hand, it marks the end of an era, and of this publication that I’ve absolutely had the pleasure of creating and sharing with you.

If you’re a digital subscriber, you will not be charged a renewal fee going forward, and will continue to have access to the digital library until your subscription runs out. As part of your subscription, you’re able to download and/or print each issue of you like, so that you never lose access to the hundreds of articles and vast amount of information in each issue.

Rather than subscribing, you can now purchase an all-access pass for a one-time fee of just $20, which gives you access to our entire digital library of issues.

Plus, for a limited time, when you purchase an all-access pass you’ll also get a gift certificate for a second all-access pass to gift to someone else.

I’m also still taking preorders for the print version of this special edition issue, but only for a few more weeks!

When you preorder the print issue, you’ll also get a digital copy of the special edition issue (this issue only), and will receive a print copy in the mail later this year (hopefully by Christmas so long as there are no shipping delays!)

Click the link in my profile or visit modernhomesteadingmagazine.com to check out the latest issue, purchase an all-access pass to the digital library and/or preorder the print issue today!

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It’s easy to romanticize homesteading, but the truth is that those homegrown vegetables, those freshly laid eggs, that loaf of bread rising on the counter, and that pantry full of home-canned food takes time, effort and dedication. It doesn’t “just happen” overnight!

But if you work on learning one new skill at a time and gain confidence in it before moving onto the next, one day you’ll be looking back and marvelling at how far you’ve come.

That’s where I’m at now. Life today looks a lot different than it did 10 years ago, when our homesteading and self-reliance journey was just beginning.

Back then we still lived in our city condo and were just beginning to dabble in all of this stuff. But my husband Ryan and I felt a sense urgency to start pursuing a more self-reliant lifestyle, and we committed to taking small steps, one day at a time to make that vision a reality.

Over the years we’ve continued to put one foot in front of the other, adding new skills and tackling new projects along the way that have helped us get to where we are today.

While there’s always more we want to learn and do, as I look around me right now, I’m so grateful that we took those first steps, especially considering what’s happened in the world over the past few years!

If you’re also feeling the urgency to take the first (or next) steps toward a more self-reliant life, this is your final reminder that today is the last day to join The Society of Self-Reliance and start levelling up your homesteading and self-sufficiency skills so that you’ve got what it takes to:

• Grow your own groceries
• Stock your pantry
• Create a natural home
• Get prepared
• Learn other important life skills like time management for homesteaders, goal setting and how to become your own handyman

And more!

If you’ve been feeling called to level up your self-reliance skills (because let’s be honest, we’re in for a wild ride these next few years with everything going on in the world), now is the time to heed that call.

Link in profile to enroll before midnight tonight, or go to thehouseandhomestead.com/society

#homesteading #selfreliance #selfsufficiency #homesteadingskills #preparedness
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There are so many reasons to grow your own food at home:

💰 Saves you money at the grocery store
🍴 Healthier than conventionally grown food
🔑 increases your overall food security
🫙 Gives you an abundance to preserve and share

But perhaps the number one reason is because it just tastes better!

Not only does food taste better when it’s freshly picked or allowed to ripen on the vine, there’s something about putting in the work to grow something from a tiny seed and then getting to see it on your dinner plate that just makes it so much more satisfying than anything you’ll ever buy from the store.

Plus, having to wait all year for fresh tomatoes or strawberries or zucchinis to be in season makes that short period when they’re available just that much more exciting!

With the world spinning out of control and food prices continuing to rise, it’s no wonder more people are taking an interest in learning to grow their own food at home. But that also means changing our relationship with food and learning to appreciate the work that goes into producing it and the natural seasonality of organically grown fruits and vegetables.

(It also means learning to preserve it so you can make the most of it and enjoy homegrown food all year long).

In my online membership program, The Society of Self-Reliance, you’ll learn how to grow your own food, from seed to harvest, as well as how to preserve it so you can enjoy the fruits (and vegetables) of your labor all year long!

You’ll also learn how to grow and craft your own herbal medicine, detox your home, become your own handyman, and so much more (because self-reliance is about more than just the food that we eat… But that’s a pretty good place to start!)

The doors to the Society are now open for a limited time only. Click the link in my profile or go to thehouseandhomestead.com/society to learn more.

#foodsecurity #homegrownfood #homesteading #selfreliance #selfsufficiency #homegrownfoodjusttastesbetter
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If you’ve been watching events unfold over the past few years and you’re feeling called to start “cutting ties” with the system and begin reclaiming your independence, The Society of Self-Reliance was made for you!

When I first launched this online membership program last year, my goal was to create a one-stop resource where members could go to learn and practice every aspect of self-reliance, as well as a space to connect with other like-minded people pursuing the same goal. And that’s exactly what you’ll get when you join!

Here’s a glimpse of what you’ll learn inside the Society:

🌱 Food Security and Self-Sufficiency: Learn the art of growing and preserving your own food, ensuring you and your loved ones have access to nutritious meals year-round.

🌿 Natural Living and Herbal Medicine Mastery: Discover the secrets to creating a low-tox home and and to growing, making and using herbal remedies to support your family’s health, naturally.

🔨 Essential Life Skills: Learn essential life skills like time management, effective goal setting and practical DIY skills to become more self-sufficient.

As a member, you’ll enjoy:

📚 Monthly Video Lessons: Gain access to our ever-growing library of video lessons, with fresh content added each month.

📞 Live Group Coaching Calls: Participate in our monthly live group coaching calls, where we deep dive into a different self-reliance topic every month, and do live demonstrations and Q&A’s.

🏡 Private Community: Join our private community forum where you can ask questions, share your progress, and connect with like-minded individuals.

I only open the doors to The Society once or twice each year, but right now, for one week only, you can become a member for just $20/month (or $200/year).

In today’s world, self-reliance is no longer a luxury, a “cute hobby,” it’s a necessity. Join us inside The Society of Self-Reliance and empower yourself with the skills you need to thrive in the new world!

Link in profile or visit thehouseandhomestead.com/society to learn more.

#selfreliance #selfreliant #selfsufficiency #selfsufficientliving #sustainableliving #modernhomesteading #homesteadingskills #preparedness
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Got out for an early morning harvest today. Been up since 3am, contemplating life, the future and the past, the order of things…

There is a rumbling right now, not just in North America, but around the world. Many of us can feel it, and know we are on the precipice of something big.

I’d been hearing about this new song that’s become an overnight viral sensation, written by an (until now) unknown singer named Oliver Anthony. His new song Rich Men North of Richmond has had 14 million views on YouTube in the past week alone, so I decided to check it out.

I also saw a clip of him playing a Farmers Market last week, and anything that has to do with Farmers Markets always has my attention;)

I can’t tell you how many tears I’ve already cried listening to that song. If you’ve heard it already, you probably know what I’m talking about, and if you haven’t, I highly recommend giving it a listen. All I can say is it’s been a while since a song resonated so deeply with me, and in this strange new world, I know I’m not the only one.

One of the lines in Anthony’s song is “Livin’ in the new world, with an old soul,” and that’s something I think so many of us in the homesteading community can relate to.

Trying to cling to better days; To a simpler time; To the old ways, all while doing our best to get by in the new world.

The world has changed drastically in the last few years especially, and it’s set to change in immense ways over the next few years. Today I’m feeling thankful for people like @oliver_anthony_music_ who give a voice to what so many are feeling right now.

Know that if you’re feeling it too, you’re far from alone. And while the future may feel uncertain and even a little scary, remember that if we stand united, we the people are a force to be reckoned with.

(Continued in comments…)
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Another garlic harvest in the books!

Garlic is easily one of my favourite crops to grow. It’s pretty much a “set if and forget it” crop. We plant in the fall and leave it to overwinter, fertilize a couple times in the spring, start watering only once the ground starts to dry out, and then harvest in the summer. We can even plant a fall succession crop after our garlic if we want so it really makes great use of garden space all year round.

Over the years we’ve managed to become completely self-sufficient with garlic. We now grow enough to eat all year (and then some!), plus we save our own seed garlic and usually have extra to sell or give away. And around here fresh, organic garlic ain’t cheap, so it’s a good cash crop for anyone who’s serious about selling it.

It took me a few years to really get the hang of garlic, but it’s one crop I’m now very confident with (knock on wood, because it’s always when we make statements like this that next year’s crop fails! Lol.)

A while back I compiled a comprehensive guide to growing, harvesting and using garlic both as an edible and medicinal crop. This is usually only available as part of a paid bundle (or in the fall 2022 issue of Modern Homesteading Magazine if you’re a subscriber;), but for a limited time I’m offering it for free, no strings attached!

Plus you’ll also get access to my step-by-step video lesson on planting garlic so you can set yourself up for success with your garlic crop this year.

Comment “Garlic” below or head to thehouseandhomestead.com/garlic-guide to get your free copy!
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#garlic #garlicharvest #homesteading #selfsufficient #selfsufficiency #selfsufficientliving #selfreliance #homegrown #groworganic #growfoodnotlawns #gardenersofinstagram #homesteadersofinstagram
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Going through photos and videos from our trip to the @modernhomesteadingconference and the vast majority are of our daughter having the time of her life!

Even if I personally got nothing else out of this gathering (which I most certainly did), watching her discover her own love of this lifestyle outside of what we do at home made my heart grow three sizes!

Homesteading is about so much more than homegrown food and self-reliance. It’s about passing on invaluable skills and an understanding of and respect for our connection to the land that provides for us to the next generation.

Being around so many other kids and families who are also pursuing a homesteading lifestyle helped show our little one that this is a movement that is so much bigger and greater than what our own family does on our little plot of land. This is a lifestyle worth pursuing, with a community unlike any other.

Glad to be back home and more excited than ever to involve my kids in everything we’re doing. But also, I think I speak for my whole family when I say we can’t wait to go back someday!
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#homesteading #modernhomesteading #raisinglittles
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If you’re simply looking for ways to save a little extra cash this summer and live well for less, here are 12 tried and tested frugal living tips for summer that you can use to save money this season without sacrificing a thing.
Head over using the link in my bio!
https://thehouseandhomestead.com/12-frugal-living-tips-summer/
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#houseandhomestead
#momentsofcalm
#pursuejoy
#simplepleasuresoflife
#thatauthenticfeeling
#findhappiness
#artofslowliving
#simplelifepleasures
#lifesimplepleasure
#simplepleasuresinlife
#thatauthenticlife
#authenticlifestyle
#liveanauthenticlife
#livinginspired
#savouringhappiness
#livemoment
#localgoodness
#simplelive
#lifeouthere
#enjoywhatyouhave
#frugallifestyle
#homesteadingmama
#offgridhomestead
#modernfarmhousekitchen
#crunchymama
#rusticfarmhouse
#farmhouseinspo
#farmhouselife
#modernhomesteading
#backyardfarmer
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